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Training Specialist Interview
Questions

25 Questions and Answers by Ryan Brown

Updated August 17th, 2018
Question 1 of 25
What do you like about your present job as a trainer?
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How to Answer
Interviewers are trying to determine if the things that you like about your current job will exist in this new position. They want to ensure you will be happy! Go ahead and share 3-5 things that you really like about your present job that would be ideal to have in a new role. Maybe you like that you work with many different employees throughout the day. Perhaps you like serving multiple departments within the company. Maybe you like that you get to present at all staff meetings. Or, maybe you like that you get to rollout new company initiatives. Share what you like, and explain at a high-level why you like that part of your role so much.
25 Training Specialist Interview Questions
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  1. What do you like about your present job as a trainer?
  2. Where do you see yourself in five years?
  3. How do you evaluate success as a trainer?
  4. Have you ever had difficulty with a supervisor?
  5. What is your greatest strength as a trainer?
  6. How do you believe you perform while giving presentations?
  7. Why do you want a career as a training specialist?
  8. When have you trained coworkers before? What did you enjoy most about this process? What did you find most challenging?
  9. Why do you believe a career training is an important tool for any organization?
  10. When have you led a training course that did not live up to your expectations? What happened? What did you learn from it?
  11. How do you prepare a training course? What research do you do beforehand? How do you decide which teaching methods you will use?
  12. How would you describe your training style?
  13. What was a successful training program you developed?
  14. What is the difference between training and development?
  15. How would you judge an employee's performance?
  16. Do you work well under pressure?
  17. Tell me about your education. How has it prepared you for a career as a Training Specialist?
  18. Are you strict when training?
  19. How do you prepare your training manual for a department?
  20. What kind of training tools do you require?
  21. Why are you the best candidate for us?
  22. Tell me about your experience as a trainer.
  23. What is your greatest weakness? What are you doing to improve it?
  24. How do you decide what gets top priority when scheduling your time and balancing training needs?
  25. How quickly do you make decisions? Give me an example of how you have done this as a trainer.
15 Training Specialist Answer Examples
1.
What do you like about your present job as a trainer?
Interviewers are trying to determine if the things that you like about your current job will exist in this new position. They want to ensure you will be happy! Go ahead and share 3-5 things that you really like about your present job that would be ideal to have in a new role. Maybe you like that you work with many different employees throughout the day. Perhaps you like serving multiple departments within the company. Maybe you like that you get to present at all staff meetings. Or, maybe you like that you get to rollout new company initiatives. Share what you like, and explain at a high-level why you like that part of your role so much.

Ryan's Answer
"I am most passionate about engaging with the different personalities in the classroom. You do not know what you do not know and they teach me how to be a better trainer all the time. You also don't know what you know and I find great joy in sharing information and knowledge that will position people up for success in their careers."
2.
Where do you see yourself in five years?
The objective of this question is to see how long you plan to stay in this position. Interviewers want to hear that you will be in a training role! Tell the interviewer that you see yourself actively engaged in the training field in five years. Explain how you hope you have grown professionally, and mention that you see yourself having continued to create a positive outlook for the organization during your five years in the role.

Ryan's Answer
"I am excited about the opportunity to develop my career in training management. It is my long-term goal to become a Director of Training for a company that values education within its organization."
3.
How do you evaluate success as a trainer?
Is success when each person walks out of the classroom and does not need to come back because they do not have any further questions? Is success seeing each person pass a comprehension test? Is success meeting a team goal? Do you speak with your students three months after each training to see if anything needs to be added to the training session? Is success when you hear nothing needs to be added to your training sessions? Go ahead and share how you like to determine if you are a successful trainer.

Ryan's Answer
"I measure my success as a trainer based on the longevity of employment after training (turnover) and the extent to which trainees are equipped to properly perform their roles and responsibilities. My work as a trainer is never done as I am constantly improving the process but we have check points and testing that ensure we are teaching the materials in a way that sticks."
4.
Have you ever had difficulty with a supervisor?
It is okay if you have! In a perfect world, you may not have had difficulty with a supervisor. If this is the case, go ahead and share that you have not had any difficulty with your supervisors. Be sure to mention that if you ever encounter this during your career you will likely just talk to the person about your concerns. Interviewers love hearing that you will try to tackle the problem! If you have had difficulty, pick an example of a time when you took the lead on trying to improve the situation in a positive way. Did you sit down with your supervisor offering your perceptions of their performance? Did you ask for the supervisor to provide clearer communication? Did you ask for your supervisor to be present more often? Taking the initiative to start up a conversation like this can be daunting, and it shows the interviewer that you are open to working through conflict in a positive way.

Ryan's Answer
"As a trainer and a professional, I have found the best way to manage conflict is to approach it with humility and the intent to resolve the issue. Conflict and pain points are always opportunities to learn, grow and develop something stronger. It is rare, but there are times when I do not agree with my supervisor and I take the initiative to share my perspective and reach common ground. A relationship with mutual respect makes this easy to do well."
5.
What is your greatest strength as a trainer?
This is the time to discuss the talent you offer, and employers want to see that you know yourself and work within your strengths. Jump right in offering your key strength! Maybe you are really good at mingling with large groups of people, speaking in front of large crowds, building connections with employees, or getting a challenging team member to see eye-to-eye with you. Next, talk about how you use this strength in the workplace! Maybe you use networking skills to build rapport with the organization at community engagements. Perhaps you have received excellent reviews for your training sessions due to your knack for building relationships with your staff. Whatever your strength may be, link it back to how it positively impacts the company.

Ryan's Answer
"My strengths as a trainer are really around tailoring large amounts of information into a fun, learning experience and using multiple delivery methods to make it a collaborative and engaging process for my audiences. This comes in handy when preparing sessions and improving upon them. I have great fun building relationships along the way."
6.
How do you believe you perform while giving presentations?
Confidence is key! Interviewers love hearing that you are confident and also open to constructive feedback. Tell the interviewer your confidence level while giving presentations, and share how comfortable you are speaking in front of groups of people.

Ryan's Answer
"As a Training Specialist, this is my niche, and I often receive feedback that indicates my success in presenting information. As any great leader serious about their development, I am open to constructive feedback and have accepted it in the past. It is important to have fun with your work!"
7.
Why do you want a career as a training specialist?
The interviewer would like to know more about what drives you to be in this line of work. When answering this question you can absolutely incorporate a personal story. You could also talk about what inspired you to become a training specialist in the first place.

Ryan's Answer
"When I was in my first career, I personally had a tough time with learning my role. I had a training specialist who would take additional time out of her day to help me. She made sure I didn't fall behind. When I looked back, years later, and realized how important her role was in my career success it really inspired me to follow the same career path. I want to be a training specialist because I understand the importance of making a difference in someone's professional life. And, I am really good at it because I genuinely care."
8.
When have you trained coworkers before? What did you enjoy most about this process? What did you find most challenging?
Think about a time you successfully trained, mentored, or coached someone. What made that time so rewarding? Begin by sharing your training experience providing a high-level overview of who you were training and what subject you were providing training on. Was it a training for a group? Or, was it a training for an individual? Then, share what made it so rewarding causing it to be such an enjoyable experience! Finally, share any roadblocks or challenges you faced along the way as well as how you overcame them.

Ryan's Answer
"As a trainer, I train my coworkers all of the time and find the process very rewarding. I enjoy the process of taking a blank space and filling it with meaningful content that makes people be better at their jobs. There are often challenges to the process but our ability to embrace them quickly determines a large part of our success."
9.
Why do you believe a career training is an important tool for any organization?
There are so many reasons! And, interviewers simply want to hear that you understand how your role as a Training Specialist fits in with the bigger puzzle of the organization.

Ryan's Answer
"Training creates efficiencies in the workplace and develops mentors to continue your work while sharpening their own development. A focus on training creates a pipeline of talent for backfilling open positions and it helps to create more cohesive teams! It is everything!"
10.
When have you led a training course that did not live up to your expectations? What happened? What did you learn from it?
As a Training Specialist, there will be times when your training courses don't live up to your expectations, and interviewers want to hear that you learn and grow from these experiences. Go ahead and share a training course that didn't live up to your expectations. Describe who you were training as well as the training topic. Next, share why you were disappointed with the outcome, what caused the disappointment, and most importantly, what you learned from the situation. Finally, share what you would do differently the next time to lead to greater happiness with the outcome of the course.

Ryan's Answer
"We recently launched a new program that had a training course developed already with it. Not realizing, we delivered the content to the organization and then came to understand it did not really meet the needs of our associates. The information was broad and did not include specific deep dives that were necessary for our team to fully understand the new program. We had to switch gears to reinvent the training and relaunch our efforts. Testing these things in advance will prevent them from happening on the scale it did."
11.
How do you prepare a training course? What research do you do beforehand? How do you decide which teaching methods you will use?
The interviewer wants to learn more about your training style and methodologies. Everyone's approach will vary a bit, and that is okay! The interviewer simply wants to hear that your approach makes sense. Go ahead and share how you prepare a training course. How do you determine how to present your materials? What steps do you take to plan the training? What tools do you use to conduct research? And, how do you ensure your training is geared towards your audiences' level of learning?

Ryan's Answer
"First we identify the need for the course. Then, we decide how we want to deliver the information and in using what medium. I depend greatly on the people doing the role to help me develop the content and we are always fine-tuning it along the way."
12.
How would you describe your training style?
Do you have a unique approach to your training? Do you utilize a common style? Are you energetic or more reserved? Do you like to do most of the talking, or do you like to have group interaction? Do you enjoy lecture style, or do you prefer group activities? Do you have a motto that defines your training? Are there common technologies that you like to utilize in your training? Go ahead and share your training style! Feel free to ask friends and colleagues to help you define your style too. Sometimes, your co-workers and friends know your style better than you!

Ryan's Answer
"I would describe my training and leadership style as fair, demanding and supportive. I value creating a learning environment that is engaging and collaborative, but also takes the role of training seriously."
13.
What was a successful training program you developed?
Being a successful Trainer is important, and interviewers want to hear that it is easy for you to think of a successful training program you have developed. Think about a training session when you left feeling fantastic about the session! This makes a perfect example! Share what type of training program you developed, who you presented the training too, and what made that session so successful.

Ryan's Answer
"I am super proud of a company leadership development program I put in place. It was designed to teach people business and give them a broader understanding of why their roles are so important to the next person in the company."
14.
What is the difference between training and development?
Simply provide your perspective on training and development.

Ryan's Answer
"Training is teaching a specific skill, process, or knowledge base. Development is a broader expansion typically learning more in-depth application or working on personal professional growth. Training tends to be more short-term focused while development tends to be more long-term focused. Both are critical components of our overall success as professionals."
15.
How would you judge an employee's performance?
Through assessments and comprehension testing! There are all sorts of ways to assess an employee's performance and understanding of course content. Simply share 2-3 common tools or ways that you like to assess performance. Perhaps you utilize a team trivia game to see how employees are picking up on the material. Maybe you like to send out a survey following your training sessions. Whatever works best for you, simply share it with the interviewer.

Ryan's Answer
"In my current organization, we partner with leaders in the performance management process to assess their performance and potential for future growth. This is based on a number of factors around KPIs and soft skills/development. It is a process that is taken seriously and give much thought along the way."
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