MockQuestions

Teamwork-Related Interview Questions

To help you prepare for your job interview, here are 25 interview questions that are focused on your teamwork skills.

Teamwork was updated by on April 8th, 2018. Learn more here.

Question 1 of 25

Tell me about a time when you led a team. What was your biggest success factor?

How to Answer

The interviewer would like to hear about a time that you led a team, with a positive outcome. Showcase for the interviewer the primary factors that made your leadership style a success. Your example could come from the workplace or perhaps a time when you led a group project during your post-secondary studies.

Written by Rachelle Enns

Next Question

25 Teamwork Interview Questions & Answers

  • 1. Tell me about a time when you led a team. What was your biggest success factor?

      How to Answer

      The interviewer would like to hear about a time that you led a team, with a positive outcome. Showcase for the interviewer the primary factors that made your leadership style a success. Your example could come from the workplace or perhaps a time when you led a group project during your post-secondary studies.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      1st Answer Example

      "Just last month I was asked to lead our day shift employees when my boss was away on sick leave. I took charge for two weeks, and the experience was quite positive! I believe the biggest success factor was that I tried to emulate his leadership style and did ask his help when I wasn't sure what to do. I feel this experience prepared me for a leadership role. I am excited to take on a team lead role again."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Admin

      "I work on the weekends as a volunteer coordinator for the local soup kitchen. Every Saturday morning, I check with the volunteers and ensure they are aware of their task for the day, and that they comply with our health and safety standards. Each week is a new group, and I believe that my level of detail and organization is the biggest success factor in ensuring a smooth service every weekend."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Manager

      "Currently, I lead a team of 45 general laborers and the odd temporary employee. I have a minimal turnover in an otherwise tumultuous work environment. My success comes from the level of respect with which I treat everyone. I am available for questions, never raise my voice, and put a lot of trust in my team, that they will always make the right choice even when I may not be around."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Marketing

      "I led a team of three marketing interns this past summer which was a cool experience. I think I was so successful because, as a recent graduate myself, I understood which gaps to address in their education while keeping in mind the hands-on experience that they would need to be successful. I am observant to the needs of others and know that this skill will be very beneficial as I seek out more leadership opportunities."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Retail

      "Our company had a sales contest last month, and I was asked to be our team leader for the challenge. I enjoyed that responsibility, and we ended up winning the reward in the end because my team increased sales by the highest percentage. I believe the biggest factor in our success was the enthusiasm I brought to the team. Everyone was engaged, and wanted to win."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Sales

      "In my last position, I led a team of outside sales representatives. I implemented ride along's where I would shadow each team member for one day per month. This hands-on approach resulted in an average 20% sales increase per team member which made my sales director very happy. It always pays to show interest in your team members, individually, by investing time into their learning."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Teacher

      "I lead a team of students every day in the classroom! I am a successful educator, and class leader, because I listen, engage with my students, offer variety in each day, and show enthusiasm for the lesson at hand."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "In my current role as a supervisor, I believe several factors have gone into my teams' success, but the biggest factor would be the trust that I have built. They trust that they can make decisions without fear of getting in trouble; they can make a mistake and know that they are not going to get yelled at. They can trust that if a case is escalated to me, I am going to have their backs."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      You make a very important distinction here - wonderful answer! Trust is very important, as well as ensuring that people feel comfortable trying new angles and potentially making mistakes.

  • 2. Tell me about the most rewarding experience you have had, working in a team environment. What made it so rewarding?

      How to Answer

      The interviewer wants to hear that you feel accomplished through teamwork. Talk about a time when you felt fulfilled through a team setting or project collaboration. An example may be a time when you worked on a team project in University, a recent work collaboration, or possibly an extracurricular experience such as coaching a little league team. Discuss the positive results of the teamwork and how you attained a positive outcome as a group.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      1st Answer Example

      "The most rewarding teamwork experience that I have had was in my last year of university. We had a project due, in teams of 4, which accounted for quite a large part of our grade. I believe everyone pulled more than their weight because so much was at stake. Teamwork is very rewarding when everyone has something significant to win, or lose."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Admin

      "One of my most rewarding teamwork experiences was while I was attending University. I learned so much by working with my classmates. I gained new problem-solving skills and learned a lot from their research preferences."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Manager

      "My business development team was not getting along, so I collaborated with a team-building service, where we had a day full of development exercises, meant to draw our team closer to each other by developing a sense of trust and camaraderie. This experience was incredibly rewarding because I saw relationships and bonds quickly form. I had a plan in place for keeping the momentum over time, which also worked well."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Marketing

      "Our marketing team recently worked on a major campaign for a well-known brand. It was by far the biggest project in my portfolio. I was the junior copywriter on the project and delivered amazing work, not just because I always strive to do my best, but because the more senior members of the team believed in my work. Their encouragement and faith in my work were all I needed to elevate my work even further."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Retail

      "Last Christmas, we were short staffed, and run off of our feet during the biggest shopping season of the year. The struggle, the overtime hours, but also the excitement of huge sales numbers, put our team on a type of high that I had not seen before. It was pure adrenaline and super exciting. This experience is by far the best team environment in which I have ever worked. I loved the excitement and the way we all banded together to ensure the success of our store."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Sales

      "The position I am currently in has been my first experience leading a team. We have knocked some seriously crazy numbers out of the park, becoming the pacesetters for many product launches. It's been exciting to see everyone flourish. I love to see everyone succeed. It's encouraging and exhilarating."

      Written by Rachelle Enns on October 9th, 2020

      Teacher

      "I approach many class projects as team-based efforts, putting students into groups with kids they may not normally choose to work alongside. It is highly rewarding to see new friendships develop while helping my students to expand their views of who they can, and should, be friends with."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Work with homeless shelter staff and volunteers to organize holiday meal and pass out gifts to adults staying at the shelter. We all worked towards a goal of putting together the meal and collect gifts to wrap and pass out. It felt good to be able to make a difference in someone's life, be part of creating a happy memory."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Alexandra E.

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Alexandra E. Reviewed the Above Answer

      This is a great example! If I were the interviewer I would follow up with a question asking what role you took on the team, so I could try to understand how specifically you work in a team environment.

  • 3. When have you been on a team project that failed? What did you learn from that experience?

      How to Answer

      We all experience perceived fails in our career. Failure is nothing to be embarrassed about so do not hesitate to describe a failure you've experienced in the past. The key to a great answer is to include how you learned from that failure, and how you improved your work performance after learning from the crash. Try to keep your example non-critical; for instance, avoid telling the interviewer how your team forgot to order new inventory, and it cost your company $15,000 in lost sales. Avoid blaming any particular person and instead, use words like 'we' and 'team' to describe the situation. Finally, be sure to tell the interviewer that, while you were very disappointed in the group's failure, you took the opportunity to learn from the experience.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      1st Answer Example

      "Our team was recently on a project with a very tight deadline. We knew the client and their needs very well which I believe made us go into the project overconfident. Because we underestimated the work involved, we missed our deadline by three business days. Thankfully we had a great relationship with that particular client, so we were able to recover from the missed deadline. Although it was late, we worked overtime and delivered an exceptional project, in the end. This experience taught me never to underestimate a project and the potential roadblocks. It's always better to under-promise and over-deliver, rather than the other way around."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Admin

      "In University, we had a group project that failed horribly. We could not seem to organize our schedules at all, and so, when we brought all of the components together, it was a complete flop. I learned shortly after about some project management apps that could have helped. Also, we could have utilized other resources like Skype. This experience taught me never to think small, and that there is always a solution - you have to look for it."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Manager

      "In my current position, our team was given a new client who needed us to recruit five employees. They were very specialized roles, and the client was not open to candidates who needed relocation assistance. Our competitor ended up finding the right candidates before we could. It was disappointing, and I believe that we failed because we were looking too much at the roadblocks rather than thinking creatively. We learned from our mistake and our team was more aggressive with our next project."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Marketing

      "I once worked for a startup marketing agency that bit off more than it could chew after acquiring a huge client. We had to learn a lot of solutions on the fly, which caused a great deal of stress amongst the team, which was primarily made up of junior marketers, and new hires. Nobody had the seniority or tenure to feel confident taking control of the situation. What I learned from this experience is that every project should have a wide range of people present, with varying levels of experience and expertise."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Retail

      "Our store came up with a unique window display that we all thought was cool. After having the display up for a couple of days, we started receiving complaints that the message was misogynistic and insensitive. Once our team took a step back and considered the feedback, we could see what others were seeing. What I learned at that moment was that, before finalizing a project, it's important to take a step back from it and dissect it for potential problems."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Sales

      "Our company recently launched a software solution for our clients that was too early-stage and should have gone through further testing. We were all so excited about the project, and created so much hype with our clients, that our excitement caused us to get ahead of ourselves. What I learned was that, no matter how exciting, a business always needs to remain level-headed and pragmatic."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      Teacher

      "We recently had a school play go awry. The faculty wanted to put on a winter performance for the parents, and we tried to make it too comprehensive and eventful. What we should have done was focus on a couple of entertaining aspects and kept the rest simple. The kids were overwhelmed and confused, as were the teachers and attendees! We all vowed to keep it simple for the following year."

      Written by Rachelle Enns

  • 4. If asked, how do you believe your coworkers would describe you?

      User-Submitted Answer

      "In talking to coworkers, I would say they would describe me as knowledgeable in both our products and software. I have people who are in roles I used to hold, frequently asking me how I would handle a situation they were in. They would also describe me as a doer as I will not just wait around for others, and I will take matters into my own hands and complete the project myself."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Kevin Downey

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Kevin Downey Reviewed the Above Answer

      It’s great that you are a do-er and are willing to jump in and complete a project on your own. Be sure to also clearly express the fact that you can mentor others as well as pass the baton to the next person. It is rarely sustainable to take everything on yourself. Exhibiting your skills by delegating and working with your team, relying on them as they rely on you, is more of a collaborative team mindset than growing impatient and bearing the burden of the work because you got tired of waiting for the rest of the team to match your pace.

      "They’d say I was a reliable and knowledgeable resource. I frequently mentored my successors in roles I once held. They’d describe me as a doer as I frequently set an enthusiastic pace, leading by example, and think fast on my feet. You have to be resourceful in order to be a resource to others. I pride myself on being a clutch-player, and being available for any need that arises with the rest of the team. So, that’s what they’d likely say. He’s a clutch player, a mentor, and an awesome resource. A team leader is what they’d say."

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  • 5. Do you have difficulty working in a team environment?

      How to Answer

      Team collaboration is a crucial part of most jobs, so it's essential that you give an overall positive reply to this question. If you have difficulty working in a team environment, that is okay; however, you need to show the interviewer that you are capable of offering flexibility between a group setting and working autonomously. In the end, the interviewer wants to know that you are capable of working positively, in a team environment.

      If you have difficulty working in a team environment: 'Depending on the scope of the project, I sometimes prefer to work autonomously; however, I am more than capable of being a positive and contributing member of a team-based project.'

      Written by Rachelle Enns on October 9th, 2020

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I love working in a team environment as I feel working in this sort of situation brings new ideas to the table, oftentimes ideas or ways of doing things that I would never think of. This allows me to learn new skills and helps me work on my communication and collaboration skills. I think working in a team transfers well to any aspect of life."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      You are right - teamwork abilities transfer to so many areas of our lives. You sound very collaborative and eager to learn. Nice response!

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  • 6. What role do you usually take in team projects?

      How to Answer

      The interviewer truly wants to understand the role that you naturally take on, when put into a team-based environment. If you tend to take the lead, you can let the interviewer know, but avoid sounding overbearing. If you usually like to generate new ideas and allow someone else to execute them, share your creative side but express that you prefer for others to take the lead.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I don't mind taking the lead, but I usually prefer someone else to lead. I feel my skills are better utilized as being an active listener to all ideas presented in the group environment. I am also a very organized person, so I usually take on an organizational role."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Your answer is honest and detailed, which is great! How do you keep yourself organized and on task when in an organizational role?

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  • 7. Tell me about the type of team members you dislike working with.

      How to Answer

      You will not always be fond of the people you are collaborating with; however, the interviewer needs to know that any inherent dislike will not affect your job performance. Keep your answer positive and focus on your ability to self-manage despite team members who may drag you down.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I enjoy working with team players, individuals that show up and do what is needed by the team. There are always individuals in any work environment that can be challenging to get along with. I don't allow myself to focus on those individuals, instead, I focus on what I can control in a team environment which is my own performance."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      Great answer! The interviewer will be assured of your ability to self-manage and concentrate on your own workload.

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  • 8. If I were to put you on a team project today, what questions would you have before beginning your work?

      User-Submitted Answer

      "What kind of time frame do I have to complete the project. What is expected of me and if I have any questions or issues who can I contact?"

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      Great! All of the questions you have listed are important to inform your approach to the project. I have suggested a slight rewording below shift the focus of the questions to the team, rather than the individual.

      "Before beginning to work on a new project, I would ask what kind of time frame does the team have to complete the project, what are the expectations of each team member, and who should we contact if we have any questions or issues. Once the team has this information, we can begin to determine how we will approach the project."

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  • 9. How do you develop trust among your team in a virtual, or work-from-home, setting?

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I love to get to know people better, what they enjoy, some background information. I would recommend that everyone answer some key questions and share anything that might be helpful while we work together as a team, such as if they have a particular skill they want to maximize. I think this allows everyone to get to know each other, become more comfortable, and build better trust to elicit a stronger team."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Nice answer! Finding out what skills people have and love to use is a fantastic way to open up trust and communication. Well said.

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  • 10. Do you think it is possible to be a good team member, yet disagree with the leader?

      How to Answer

      The interviewer wants to know that you can be diplomatic in the workplace, even when you may not agree with your leader. Show the interviewer that it is possible for you to be a good team member, yet disagree with the leader from time to time. Explain that you believe everyone is entitled to their own professional opinion, yet capable of maintaining respect for each other at the same time. Show that even if you disagree with the final decision they make, you support the direction the team is heading.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Yes, everyone is entitled to their professional opinions. However, sometimes, all the information has not been available to make the decision either from my boss or from me. I have a responsibility to share what I know so that the leader can make the best decision, but also to trust the leadership position and their experience in the final analysis. If I was wrong, I acknowledge that to the leader and explain what I learned in the situation. If I was right, I don't say anything but try to figure out what I could have done to explain my position to the leader better."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Wonderful answer! I like that you mentioned what you do if you are wrong, and if you are right. You show a humble and collaborative approach.

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  • 11. Have you ever had to adapt your work style to fit team objectives?

      How to Answer

      The interviewer wants to see that you are open to change and are adaptable. Think about the times when you have had to learn a new policy, change your organization approach, or times when you have had to change your plan for meeting a goal. Talk to the interviewer about how you altered this work style to achieve the team's objectives. Be sure to mention that you were happy to accommodate this change to help the team reach the overall goal.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Absolutely! I am a natural leader and want to lead from the front. Some projects already have a leader in charge which is great, I fit into the role that will best benefit the team. This doesn't mean I throw my leadership skills out the window, I just use them in a different role."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent! It sounds like you are a strong team player and are able to adapt as necessary to ensure the team meets its goal. Consider adding a statement to the end of your response that indicates you are happy to adjust your role to ensure the team is successful.

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  • 12. What qualities do you believe are most valuable for a team lead to possess?

      How to Answer

      The interviewer wants to know the attributes that you value most in a team leader. List a few characteristics that you feel are most valuable for a team leader to possess and be sure to comment on how those relate to your strengths.

      Good examples might include:

      - Trustworthy
      - Accountable
      - Committed
      - Results-oriented
      - Detailed
      - Driven
      - Strong Negotiator
      - Reliable

      All of these attributes are valuable in a team setting, and any of them will make sound examples for you.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Building a culture of trust with freedom for teammates to try and fail, to ask for and receive help and encouragement to try out of the box ideas without micromanaging and the openness to discuss and address what worked and what didn't and why improving together."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      These are good qualities, indeed! I have organized your answer a touch, so it sounds more personal and less like a list you're rattling off.

      "I believe a team should work hard at building a culture of trust where teammates feel the freedom to try and fail, or ask for and receive help and encouragement. It's also valuable for a team to feel comfortable trying new ideas and having the openness to discuss what worked, what didn't work, and what could be improved on by working together."

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  • 13. Tell me about a time when communication became an issue during a team project.

      How to Answer

      The interviewer wants to know how you overcome challenges in a team environment. They want to see that you persevere, despite being faced with teamwork challenges. Give an example of a time when communication became an issue; perhaps due to personality differences or a misunderstanding when it came to the scope of the project. Be sure to express to the interviewer how the communication issues affected the team, and how you overcame those communication challenges.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "In my current job, there have been numerous times when leadership has given numerous different people mixed signals on certain projects. I have been really good about slowing down the chaos and touching base with the different members of leadership and making sure expectations and goals are clear, so our team can move forward on the same page."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      This is a great start. Your response highlights how you are able to use your leadership skills to clarify the expectations and goals of the project. However, with this "Tell me about a time when..." style question, you will want to give a detailed story-based example. Can you narrow your response to a specific project where management provided mixed signals? To ensure that you are specific and organized in your story response, try using the STAR framework. STAR is an acronym for Situation, Task, Action, Result. You can find information about the STAR format here. Master Behavioral-Based Interviews Using The Star Method

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  • 14. Give an example of when your team motivated you. How did this gesture enhance your performance?

      How to Answer

      Everyone needs to be motivated now and then! The interviewer would like to know some of the ways that you can be driven, even on the toughest of days. Many people find motivation through incentives, additional training, and positive affirmations. Think of a time when you needed extra motivating. Share what members of your team did to drive you, and how it positively affected your performance.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "The other day while in Japan recruiting, traveling almost every day, and being "on" for the Pre-Departure Orientations while fielding emails from UD, I was feeling incredibly tired. A colleague sent an email outlining how thankful she was that we were going above and beyond in the recruiting because she knew it was beneficial for students but also for faculty and staff in their jobs. That email-enabled me to get through the rest of the trip with a positive attitude and goal that was bigger and more important than me."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      This gesture sounds very thoughtful, and it's a great example of how teams can lift each other up. Good answer!

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  • 15. Do you prefer to work on your own, or as a part of a team?

      How to Answer

      This question is not a trick one! The interviewer is trying to get a feel for your personality and how you interact with others. You may work well without the need for much management or direction, or perhaps you are better driven by a collaborative and team led environment. Either way, be honest with the interviewer about your preferences without leaning negatively, either way.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I prefer to work both ways. I love working in teams as I feel it opens my mind to new ideas and techniques of thinking that might be more efficient than what I am used to. I enjoy working alone as well, so I can develop my ideas and contributions and come back to get feedback from the team."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Your answer brings a nice balance. You show a strong understanding of the ebbs and flows of the workplace.

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  • 16. Have you ever worked in a cross-functional environment?

      How to Answer

      If you work for a larger company, you may have been asked to work on a project with teams from another department. Your ability to work with cross-functional teams will be a significant asset to your potential employer, especially if they are a larger organization.

      Maybe you headed a project which required you to collaborate with the members of the engineering and sales teams. You may have had the opportunity to organize a volunteer activity or team building exercise, company-wide. Share any challenges that came up and what you learned from the experience.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

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  • 17. Tell me about your exposure to team building exercises.

      How to Answer

      If you have ever participated in a ropes course or a trust fall, then you have engaged in team building exercises! Of course, most examples of team-building do not need to be that extreme. Any activity or company effort that motivates teams and builds trust among co-workers is considered a team-building exercise.

      Many companies will offer team experiences to help build stable groups who collaborate and communicate better. If you have experience as a participant or leader, share your knowledge and be sure to highlight your biggest takeaway from experience.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "At my current company, we build teams by doing activities together. Going to sporting events, bowling, go-kart racing, and golfing. This allows us to get away from work and just hang out and be yourself."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      It sounds as though you have a fun team culture - this is nice to hear! Do you arrange these events yourself?

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  • 18. Tell me about a time there was a serious conflict on your team. How did you resolve it?

      How to Answer

      When cooperating with groups of people from different backgrounds and various work styles, conflict is inevitable. Think of an example of when your team experienced a conflict. Be sure to highlight how you skillfully handled these conflict issues.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "For my current job, we have a project to build datorama dashboards to conduct marketing analysis and visualize campaign performance for each of our clients. The project involves working with a software engineer and a client success manager. They are very talented, but their techniques often didn't work well together. They had worked on this project for more than six months. They pushed the deadline several times, and both thought it was not their problem. So I jumped in, mediated the situation, sorted out issues, and suggested ways to work together.



      First of all, I talked to the engineer and client success manager separately to understand their work. From our meeting, I learned that first, we had a template created by the datorama team for us, and we could make changes as needed and use it for replication. Second, for the client success manager, his work was put forward all the requirements for the dashboard, such as metrics he wants to present and the way they should look. For the engineer, his work was to implement these ideas and use javascript to build custom visualizations (like heatmap and pacing bars) that are not provided by the software. However, I noticed there was a gap between their work, and no one was actually responsible for the dashboard design, original data ingestion to the platform, and final data quality check of the dashboards. Besides, we only had one dashboard created. We needed to find a way to create a template of our own and replicate it for all other clients.



      After that, I suggested we complete the template and conduct a data quality check within two weeks and then start the replication process. I found I can help with the dashboard design, the engineer can perform data ingestion, and the cs manager can perform the final data quality check. With my suggestions, I created the first draft of the dashboard. There were some problems coming up, but we successfully finished the template and first-round data quality checks in two weeks.



      Then, I documented the replication process, and we shared the workload to replicate for all clients. We did several rounds of data quality checks to make sure all dashboards looked good and all data was correct.



      One month after I joined the project, we finally rolled over these reports to our clients. I got a lot of compliments from the team for my initiative to solve the problem. And I even got rewarded at our all-hands meetings. I could go around knowing that everyone recognized my work in the cross-function team, and they trusted my ability to deliver and be reliable. This was a rewarding experience for me."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent answer! You do a very nice job bringing this story to life. It's evident how you took action to solve this issue, and you smoothed out many factors for your projects, your team, yourself, and your company. Well done!

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  • 19. Have you experienced difficulties working with a previous manager? How did you handle the difference of opinion?

      How to Answer

      One of the ways you can show maturity and leadership in the workplace is by taking the initiative to build a healthy relationship with whoever is directly supervising you. If you experience conflict with a manager, you will know how to respond because you have already established a real-life example. Give an honest example of a time when you supported your manager despite a difference of opinion.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Direct communication, is always as simple as a conversation to resolve any issues."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      Direct communication is an effective way to resolve conflict. However, you have not quite answered the question. Let the interviewer know if you have experienced conflict with a manager in your professional career. If so, discuss the circumstances as well as how you were able to manage the relationship.

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  • 20. Tell me about a time when you accomplished a team goal. Why do you think your team was successful?

      How to Answer

      You can accomplish so much more if there is excellent synergy within your team! Leveraging everyone's skills and best personality traits can encourage a group to be more effective than ever. Share an example that demonstrates your understanding of teamwork. Some factors that make the team successful are:

      - Cohesive personalities
      - Varying skills
      - Varying experience levels
      - Professional communication
      - Mutual respect
      - Brainstorm sessions
      - Clear role identity

      Written by Rachelle Enns

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  • 21. How do you motivate your fellow team members?

      How to Answer

      You don't have to be a manager or a team leader to motivate others. Offering a listening ear or providing words of encouragement can make a world of difference to your coworkers. Sometimes, just being a positive influence and showing up to help, can also make a difference.

      If you have worked in a leadership role, think of ways you helped set clear goals or helped individuals cultivate a new skill. Reflect on your experience and share how you have encouraged others to keep up the good work!

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I motivate team members by asking them how they are doing and if they need help with anything. I think this allows people to feel like someone cares about them and makes them feel more like part of a team if another member is willing to help them with something they are struggling with to accomplish individually."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      It's very important to show that you care about others, and it seems you know exactly how to motivate anyone who needs a little bit of encouragement. Nicely done!

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  • 22. How do you make tough decisions knowing they will affect your entire team?

      How to Answer

      It can be difficult to make challenging decisions when you know that your entire team will be affected. Your ability to be decisive and diplomatic will make all the difference!

      If you take a more team-oriented approach, share how you collaborate with the group by inviting everyone to discuss their opinions and come to a census. Perhaps you prefer to take charge. Share how you step up to a decision while still keeping everyone's needs and feelings into consideration.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Gather the data, ask for input, and hopefully lead the team to the decision that must be made. Make the decision and take action swiftly, explaining why the decision must be made and its consequences."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      It sounds like you have a good process in place for solid decision making.

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  • 23. How do you handle working in challenging team environments?

      How to Answer

      The interviewer would like to see that you can adapt to working in a team environment, where difficulties may be present. Pick a recent team project that generated successful results but was an overall challenge. Give the interviewer a short overview of the project, including what the final goal of the project was. Next, share the challenges your group faced. Avoid criticizing any individuals in the group. Discuss how you rose to the occasion by coming up with alternate solutions whenever you met a roadblock.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Sometimes you have to pick your battles, step back and ask honestly, candidly ask why this is challenging. Is it me, is it how I am treating someone or not listening to them or understanding their style? I was talking to a junior colleague while away in Japan about this. It came to me to explain to this colleague that every time this happens, we have an opportunity to practice and grow my leadership."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      This answer is good, but I became a bit lost when you mentioned the junior colleague in Japan and working to grow your leadership. If you are going to bring a story into the equation, see it through and give more detail. I have tweaked the answer a bit, below.

      "When working in challenging team environments, I will look inward and ask why the situation is challenging me. Perhaps it is how I am communicating with someone or the fact that I do not understand the work style of another team member. When challenging situations arise, I see them as an opportunity to practice and grow my leadership skills."

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  • 24. Tell me about a time you worked on a team.

      How to Answer

      Your job may be independent by nature, but at some point in your career or post-secondary experience, you have worked as part of a team. Give the interviewer an example of a time when you worked in a group setting. Outline the role that you took in the group and remember to discuss a bit about the project. Highlight your most significant success in this team. Lastly, explain how your teamwork capabilities will help you to succeed in this role.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

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  • 25. When was the last time you contributed to a team effort and what was your role?

      How to Answer

      The interviewer would like further details on what you consider to be a substantial contribution when you are in a team setting. Your example can come from a previous role or your current one. You can also draw on experience from your high school or post-secondary education if you are newer to your career. Volunteer experience is a great situation to bring an example from as well. Give the interviewer an idea of what you did to contribute, and be sure to mention any accolades you may have received for your excellent contribution.

      Written by Rachelle Enns

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