Interviews Questions by Career
Interviews Questions by Company
Interviews Questions by Topic
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Ask the Interviewer
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns
Updated August 4th, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Job Interviews     Topics    

Question 1 of 30

How do you feel I stand out from your other candidates?

How to Answer
Community Answers
1000s of Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.

Answer Examples

1.

How do you feel I stand out from your other candidates?

By asking this question, you are trying to find out the areas that the interviewer finds you to be the most impressive. If the interviewer tells you where you best stand out, you can use this information as positive leverage in your future interviews.

The interviewer will most likely not mention any details about the other candidates, but they should let you know a few positives stand-outs in your application.

Perhaps you are the strongest in a particular software program, or maybe your energetic personality makes you a great candidate. Whatever the interviewer's reply, be sure to thank them for the positive feedback.

Anonymous Answer

"I love to help people get problems solved, so when they call in and tell me they were in an accident and I can assist them in getting something fixed is awesome."

Lauren's Answer

"I am innately a people person. I gain so much satisfaction by helping others. I am eager to receive an opportunity where I can let my best qualities shine."

Was this answer helpful? Yes (16) or No (10)

2.

How often do you have performance reviews, or offer feedback to your employees?

Before joining a company, you want to know that you will receive appropriate guidance and feedback from them during your tenure. Receiving regular reviews will only benefit you as you grow in your career because you will be able to see where you can improve and immediately pivot, readjusting your actions and leading you straight to success!

Look for an employer that offers performance reviews at least twice per year. In roles where optimum performance is directly attached to your compensation, quarterly reports are more common.

You will also want to ask about the quality of the reviews. Are they informal check-ins, or formal meetings with your leadership team? The nature of these meetings should be important to you because the more seriously your leaders take your growth, the faster you will advance in your career.

3.

What is the most exciting goal for this company in the next year?

As a potential new hire, you will naturally be interested in the targets and goals of the interviewing company. In addition to your research, be sure to ask the interviewer what they are currently working on, and what is the most exciting innovation, product, service, or upcoming change facing the company over the next while.

The more the interviewer divulges, regarding their company's short-term goals, the better you can draw the correlation between your experience and their goals.

This question can be a great conversation piece. As the interviewer offers their answer be sure to ask more in-depth questions for further understanding, and how enthusiasm for the work they are doing!

4.

What are the next steps in your interview process?

For you to perform at your peak during your interviews, it's best if you know what to expect when it comes to the interview process. Knowing what is happening next, will help you to assess the preparation and research you will need to succeed in these meetings.

The interviewer should be able to give you an overview of who you will be meeting with, along with the estimated timeline between each of these interviews. Some organizations will have just one meeting, and some may have as many as 5+ interviews with different team members. This situation will all depend on the level of position for which you are interviewing.

If the process seems far too drawn out to fit in within your ideal timeline, you can say something like this: "Thank you for explaining the interview process to me. By my calculations, we would be in the final stages of interviewing in the next six weeks. I am seeking a role as soon as possible, so if I can accommodate dates closer together, I am happy to give you the flexibility you need to make that happen."

Rachelle's Answer

"Thank you for explaining the interview process to me. By my calculations, we would be in the final stages of interviewing in the next six weeks. I am seeking a role as soon as possible, so if I can accommodate dates closer together, I am happy to give you the flexibility you need to make that happen."

5.

What is your favorite part of working here?

You will find out a few things when asking the interviewer what they like best about working for this employer.

One, you will learn just how passionate (or not) the person interviewing with you is about their job. If they have a contagious enthusiasm after working at this company for many years, you can be confident in knowing that this is an excellent company to join.

Two, you will learn about this person who you may work for, and what makes them tick. Are they open to communicate with you what they love about their job? Or, are they closed off and shut down your question after only engaging with you briefly?

The way the interviewer answers this question should excite you and make you want to work for them. If their response is lackluster, you may want to take a more in-depth look at their employees' happiness levels.

6.

Who are your top competitors, and how do you stand apart?

You should already know a bit about the company's top competitors, from the research you conducted before your interview. Let the interviewer know that you believe company A, B, and C to be the most obvious competitors, and then express that you would like to learn more.

The information that you are looking for will focus on how the company feels internally, with the way they compete in their marketplace. Perhaps it is their exceptional level of customer service or a much superior product offering.

Whatever the answer may be, look for pride and excitement on the interviewers' behalf. Also, the more you learn from asking this question, the more information you will have in your toolbox for future interviews.

7.

What has been the company's most significant innovation this year?

You have already familiarized yourself with the position, and the basics of the company, but have you performed a deep dive into the company's recent accomplishments or accolades? It's great to know a bit about the organizations' innovations and awards before going into your interview.

Show the interviewer that you are aware of what their company has been doing in the past 12-18 months but then ask a follow-up question to gain more 'insider information' so to speak.

For instance, you could say: "I see that your company was recently nominated for the 'Top 100 Companies to work for in Denver.' Could you share with me another significant moment in your company's history this past year?"

An interviewer is almost always thrilled to talk about their company's happenings and achievements.

Rachelle's Answer

"I see that your company was recently nominated for the 'Top 100 Companies to work for in Denver.' Could you share with me another significant moment in your company's history this past year?"

8.

Which tools and resources would be provided to me, to ensure my success?

Tools and resources to ensure your success can range from technical provisions to events and educational opportunities. What you are looking for with this particular question is evidence that the company will invest in you and guarantee a positive experience for both parties.

An interviewer should be able to give you at least one to two examples of ways they invest in the success of their employees. Some tools that are available to employers are:

- Personality Assessments. These comprehensive assessments, such as Gallup, will show your employer how you are motivated, the learning methods you best respond to, and the leadership styles you prefer.

- Expert Management. When junior, inexperienced people are placed in leadership positions without training, nobody wins. The interviewer should be able to assure you that those you are reporting to are experts in their realm.

- Individual Development Plans. These plans are roadmaps for employees, created in collaboration with their leader. The strategies focus on timed goals that are measurable. Most IDP's are visited quarterly, like a performance review.

- Clear Metrics. If you have clear targets and expectations, you are more likely to succeed in your role. If an employer lets you roam, hoping or guessing that your performance is satisfactory, you are more likely to become disengaged and quit.

- Constructive Feedback. Having a manager who will give you on point, in the moment feedback, is incredibly valuable to any employee. Your responsibility then is to make sure you can accept all feedback graciously while also implementing necessary change immediately.

- Organizational Structure. The less hierarchical the organization, the more likely you will be to succeed. When a company is built flat, you will have better access to your leaders and other departments, allowing you to expand skills outside of your immediate job function.

You can also let the interviewer know which tools and resources you would love to see in your next role. Let them know how to best guide you, and you will undoubtedly set yourself up for success.

Anonymous Answer

"What kind of technical and educational help would be provided to me to succeed in this field?"

Rachelle's Answer

This is a great question to ask!

Was this answer helpful? Yes (6) or No (0)

9.

How would you describe the company culture?

Finding the right 'fit' for yourself is just as important as the interviewer finding the right 'fit' for themselves. Although you may urgently need a new position, it's always best to take a deeper dive into the company to ensure they are going to offer you the workplace environment that you need.

Here are the most common types of company cultures, and an example of what to look for:

1. Leadership Driven: This type of company will invest in their leaders, and will offer you coaching and mentorship opportunities. They will also put a focus on developing you as a leader in your role whether that be through empowerment, growth opportunities, or giving you a team of your own to lead, down the road.

2. Mission Driven: A company that is mission-driven will hire employees based on how passionate they are for their cause. This type of organization is often more of a collaborative environment and can be in faith-based kinds of companies, or startups. Be aware that sometimes boundaries can be forgotten in a mission-driven environment as the leadership team will often act as though the mission is more important than anything else.

3. Customer Driven: Many companies have the "customer is always right" attitude. This attitude can be excellent but make sure to ask questions related to how they empower their employees in a time of customer-related conflict. You want to ensure that your company will stand behind you when needed, while also supporting a customer-centric environment. There needs to be a healthy balance.

4. Target Driven: Companies that are sales, or target driven tend to attach everything their employees do, to a destination, number, or goal. You will most likely enjoy this type of workplace culture if you are a competitive personality. If you are not competitive, you should ask more questions regarding how your performance and successes are measured in this role. Also, do a deeper dive into how you would be rewarded for successes and what happens when targets are not met.

You may find that the company you are interviewing with has a mix of all of these, which will usually be the case. Digging into employee review sites will be an excellent resource for you so that you can find out what past and current employees think about the workplace culture.

Rachelle's Answer

"customer is always right"

10.

How can I begin to prepare myself for success in this position?

By

11.

Are there any expectations related to overnight travel or eventual relocation?

Travel and eventual relocation are topics often included in the job posting, but they are not always. These topics are more relevant to specific job functions such as sales, business development, client management, or leadership positions.

If these topics remain unmentioned in the job posting, you can say: "Could you share with me if there is daytime or overnight travel in this role? Also, I know that your headquarters are in Texas. Will there be the potential need for relocation at any point?"

Rachelle's Answer

"Could you share with me if there is daytime or overnight travel in this role? Also, I know that your headquarters are in Texas. Will there be the potential need for relocation at any point?"

12.

What is the most important quality to possess in this role?

By asking this question, your goal should be to find out what quality the interviewer values most for this position, assess whether you possess this quality, and then speak further about how you will meet this need.

Let's say, for instance, the interviewer says that the most important quality to possess in this role is reliability. You can then begin to speak about how you have been reliable in the past, or with your most recent employer. Perhaps you stayed late when necessary, checked your emails after hours when you knew a client would be responding, or maybe you would bring coffee for the team when they were working late on a project.

If the quality that the interviewer mentions are something you are not overly versed in, you can speak about how you are strengthening that area. For instance, if the essential quality is to be amazing in Excel, you could let the interviewer know that you are an intermediate user and that you are taking additional coursework this month to make sure you are in the expert level realm by the end of the year.

Whatever the interviewers' response, the key is to support further how you will bring this vital quality to the company, should you be the successful candidate.

13.

How would you measure my success in this role?

Will your future employer set your goals and targets from past data and results, or pull out unachievable numbers from thin air, expecting you to reach them?

This question is especially important to ask if you are interviewing for a sales-based role, or if you will be working in a leadership function.

If the interviewer is unable to give specific examples of how your success is measured, you should ask to see past blind reports from others in the role before accepting a position. How your performance is measured and communicated, is enough to make or break you in your new job which is why you should be adamant when it comes to pursuing this information!

14.

Is there anything about my background that I can further clarify for you?

When you ask the interviewer a question like this, you are removing some of their opportunity to reject you for reasons that may not be clear or even accurate.

As a candidate, it is easy to unintentionally breeze over parts of your background and work history that may be more important than you thought.

The interviewer, if they are unclear on parts of your background, will then have the chance to back up and ask you for further clarification. You should ask this question in every single interview as it is incredibly useful!

15.

Is there any reason why you feel I would not be a good fit for this position?

Any time you are asking a question this targeted, there will be a risk of hearing something that you don't want to hear. Be sure that you are prepared to accept feedback on your application, your qualifications, or even your interviewing skills.

By asking this question, you are asking the interviewer to identify where your application is weak so that you have the opportunity to correct your reply or give a more precise answer on that particular subject.

Be sure to thank the interviewer for their feedback and then take some time to overcome their objection. For instance, if the interviewer says they feel that your Excel skills are not strong enough, you could say: "Thank you for that feedback. I am perhaps more humble in regards to my Excel skills than I should have been. I am currently ranked as an Intermediate user but will be enrolling in a three-week online program immediately to raise my skills to be Expert level."

Rachelle's Answer

"Thank you for that feedback. I am perhaps more humble in regards to my Excel skills than I should have been. I am currently ranked as an Intermediate user but will be enrolling in a three-week online program immediately to raise my skills to be Expert level."

More Interview Q&As
Explore expert tips and resources to be more confident in your next interview.
Behavioral
Common
Phone
Tough
Leadership
All Interview Topics
All Career Q&As
30 Ask the Interviewer Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.

Interview Questions

  1. How do you feel I stand out from your other candidates?
  2. How often do you have performance reviews, or offer feedback to your employees?
  3. What is the most exciting goal for this company in the next year?
  4. What are the next steps in your interview process?
  5. What is your favorite part of working here?
  6. Who are your top competitors, and how do you stand apart?
  7. What has been the company's most significant innovation this year?
  8. Which tools and resources would be provided to me, to ensure my success?
  9. How would you describe the company culture?
  10. How can I begin to prepare myself for success in this position?
  11. Are there any expectations related to overnight travel or eventual relocation?
  12. What is the most important quality to possess in this role?
  13. How would you measure my success in this role?
  14. Is there anything about my background that I can further clarify for you?
  15. Is there any reason why you feel I would not be a good fit for this position?
  16. Who does this position report to?
  17. What is your management style?
  18. How do you encourage continued learning opportunities and professional development?
  19. Which programs do you use to manage workflow and communication?
  20. How do you set clear goals and targets for your employees?
  21. What is the most critical function in this position?
  22. What is your ideal timeline for this hiring decision?
  23. Could you explain to me the typical career path of someone in this role?
  24. What is this company's biggest struggle right now?
  25. Is this a replacement search, or a newly created position?
  26. Can you share with me a bit about the training schedule and process?
  27. What would you like to see from me in the first 30 days?
  28. In your opinion, how can I best succeed in this role?
  29. What does an average day look like, in this role?
  30. Could you share with me the average employee tenure in this role, and in your company as a whole?
Disclaimer
Our interview questions and answers are created by experienced recruiters and interviewers. These questions and answers do not represent any organization, school, or company on our site. Interview questions and answer examples and any other content may be used else where on the site. We do not claim our questions will be asked in any interview you may have. Our goal is to create interview questions and answers that will best prepare you for your interview, and that means we do not want you to memorize our answers. You must create your own answers, and be prepared for any interview question in any interview.
Learn more about what we believe >
Read our Terms of Use for more information >