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30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated August 4th, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Question 1 of 30
How do you feel I stand out from your other candidates?
View Answer
How to Answer
By asking this question, you are trying to find out the areas that the interviewer finds you to be the most impressive. If the interviewer tells you where you best stand out, you can use this information as positive leverage in your future interviews.

The interviewer will most likely not mention any details about the other candidates, but they should let you know a few positives stand-outs in your application.

Perhaps you are the strongest in a particular software program, or maybe your energetic personality makes you a great candidate. Whatever the interviewer's reply, be sure to thank them for the positive feedback.
30 Ask the Interviewer Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
  1. How do you feel I stand out from your other candidates?
  2. Are there any expectations related to overnight travel or eventual relocation?
  3. Who does this position report to?
  4. What is your management style?
  5. Which tools and resources would be provided to me, to ensure my success?
  6. How do you encourage continued learning opportunities and professional development?
  7. Which programs do you use to manage workflow and communication?
  8. How can I begin to prepare myself for success in this position?
  9. How would you measure my success in this role?
  10. How often do you have performance reviews, or offer feedback to your employees?
  11. How do you set clear goals and targets for your employees?
  12. What is the most critical function in this position?
  13. What are the next steps in your interview process?
  14. Is there anything about my background that I can further clarify for you?
  15. Is there any reason why you feel I would not be a good fit for this position?
  16. How would you describe the company culture?
  17. Could you explain to me the typical career path of someone in this role?
  18. What has been the company's most significant innovation this year?
  19. What is this company's biggest struggle right now?
  20. Who are your top competitors, and how do you stand apart?
  21. What is the most exciting goal for this company in the next year?
  22. Is this a replacement search, or a newly created position?
  23. Can you share with me a bit about the training schedule and process?
  24. What would you like to see from me in the first 30 days?
  25. In your opinion, how can I best succeed in this role?
  26. What does an average day look like, in this role?
  27. Could you share with me the average employee tenure in this role, and in your company as a whole?
  28. What is your ideal timeline for this hiring decision?
  29. What is the most important quality to possess in this role?
  30. What is your favorite part of working here?
15 Ask the Interviewer Answer Examples
1.
How do you feel I stand out from your other candidates?
By asking this question, you are trying to find out the areas that the interviewer finds you to be the most impressive. If the interviewer tells you where you best stand out, you can use this information as positive leverage in your future interviews.

The interviewer will most likely not mention any details about the other candidates, but they should let you know a few positives stand-outs in your application.

Perhaps you are the strongest in a particular software program, or maybe your energetic personality makes you a great candidate. Whatever the interviewer's reply, be sure to thank them for the positive feedback.
Anonymous Answer
"I love to help people get problems solved, so when they call in and tell me they were in an accident and I can assist them in getting something fixed is awesome."
Lauren's Answer
"I am innately a people person. I gain so much satisfaction by helping others. I am eager to receive an opportunity where I can let my best qualities shine."
Was this answer helpful? Yes (10) or No (9)
2.
Are there any expectations related to overnight travel or eventual relocation?
Travel and eventual relocation are topics often included in the job posting, but they are not always. These topics are more relevant to specific job functions such as sales, business development, client management, or leadership positions.

If these topics remain unmentioned in the job posting, you can say: "Could you share with me if there is daytime or overnight travel in this role? Also, I know that your headquarters are in Texas. Will there be the potential need for relocation at any point?"
Rachelle's Answer
"Could you share with me if there is daytime or overnight travel in this role? Also, I know that your headquarters are in Texas. Will there be the potential need for relocation at any point?"
3.
Who does this position report to?
This question is a simple one, meant to be asked in early stage interviews, only when you do not know who oversees the day-to-day activities of this role.

It is common to report to more than one person. Once you are told whom you will be reporting to, be sure to go on LinkedIn and study their profiles and past career. This information will be helpful to you in your future interviews.

If the interviewer is not yet sure who you will be reporting to, this is an indication of internal restructuring. If this is the case, you need to dig deeper and ask more questions about the way the office or department is set up.
4.
What is your management style?
This question is a very direct one, and forces the interviewer to give you a substantial reply regarding how they plan to manage you, should you be the successful candidate.

There are a variety of management styles and, before your interview, you should put thought into the management methods to which you best respond.

These are the most common styles of management:

- Administrative (process, process, process!)
- Authoritarian (they thrive on authority)
- Democratic (participative decision making)
- Laissez-Faire (minimal direction, you are self-guided)
- Leaders (motivating and influential)
- Political (all tactics and strategy)
5.
Which tools and resources would be provided to me, to ensure my success?
Tools and resources to ensure your success can range from technical provisions to events and educational opportunities. What you are looking for with this particular question is evidence that the company will invest in you and guarantee a positive experience for both parties.

An interviewer should be able to give you at least one to two examples of ways they invest in the success of their employees. Some tools that are available to employers are:

- Personality Assessments. These comprehensive assessments, such as Gallup, will show your employer how you are motivated, the learning methods you best respond to, and the leadership styles you prefer.

- Expert Management. When junior, inexperienced people are placed in leadership positions without training, nobody wins. The interviewer should be able to assure you that those you are reporting to are experts in their realm.

- Individual Development Plans. These plans are roadmaps for employees, created in collaboration with their leader. The strategies focus on timed goals that are measurable. Most IDP's are visited quarterly, like a performance review.

- Clear Metrics. If you have clear targets and expectations, you are more likely to succeed in your role. If an employer lets you roam, hoping or guessing that your performance is satisfactory, you are more likely to become disengaged and quit.

- Constructive Feedback. Having a manager who will give you on point, in the moment feedback, is incredibly valuable to any employee. Your responsibility then is to make sure you can accept all feedback graciously while also implementing necessary change immediately.

- Organizational Structure. The less hierarchical the organization, the more likely you will be to succeed. When a company is built flat, you will have better access to your leaders and other departments, allowing you to expand skills outside of your immediate job function.

You can also let the interviewer know which tools and resources you would love to see in your next role. Let them know how to best guide you, and you will undoubtedly set yourself up for success.
Anonymous Answer
"What kind of technical and educational help would be provided to me to succeed in this field?"
Rachelle's Answer
This is a great question to ask!
Was this answer helpful? Yes (4) or No (0)
6.
How do you encourage continued learning opportunities and professional development?
It's crucial for your career growth that you join a company who will put energy and resources into your professional development. Nobody wants to remain stagnant in one role for a lifetime!

The interviewer should be able to give you specific examples of initiatives the company takes when it comes to employee investment. Some common ways that companies will develop their team:

- Cross- training across departments.
- Creation of 1 year and 5-year plans for you to visit with leadership regularly
- Tuition reimbursement programs
- Experiences such as trade shows, conferences, or client meetings
- Regular feedback meetings and performance reviews
- Gifts of leadership and business books
- Learning portals for self-guided online coursework
-Team-building activities and training events
- Supporting individual volunteer efforts or providing volunteer opportunities

As you can see - it is effortless for a company to find ways to invest in their employee's growth and happiness. If the company you are interviewing with does not offer any of these types of experiences, you may wish to reconsider jumping on board.
7.
Which programs do you use to manage workflow and communication?
Your objective is to gain specific names of the software programs and applications most used in this role.

Some companies may include this information in the job posting. If this information is provided to you already, you could say: "I see in the job posting that you are looking for a candidate skilled in PowerPoint and various SAP modules. Could you share with me any other programs or applications that you use for managing workflow and client communication?"

If you have experience in programs such as Slack, Basecamp, Trello, etc.; be sure to mention those. A best case scenario is for the interviewer to give you the names of all programs and apps used in the role so that you can begin to learn them on your own time, shortening your training and onboarding time once hired. This type of initiative is rare and will make you a more competitive candidate.
Rachelle's Answer
"I see in the job posting that you are looking for a candidate skilled in PowerPoint and various SAP modules. Could you share with me any other programs or applications that you use for managing workflow and client communication?"
8.
How can I begin to prepare myself for success in this position?
By
9.
How would you measure my success in this role?
Will your future employer set your goals and targets from past data and results, or pull out unachievable numbers from thin air, expecting you to reach them?

This question is especially important to ask if you are interviewing for a sales-based role, or if you will be working in a leadership function.

If the interviewer is unable to give specific examples of how your success is measured, you should ask to see past blind reports from others in the role before accepting a position. How your performance is measured and communicated, is enough to make or break you in your new job which is why you should be adamant when it comes to pursuing this information!
10.
How often do you have performance reviews, or offer feedback to your employees?
Before joining a company, you want to know that you will receive appropriate guidance and feedback from them during your tenure. Receiving regular reviews will only benefit you as you grow in your career because you will be able to see where you can improve and immediately pivot, readjusting your actions and leading you straight to success!

Look for an employer that offers performance reviews at least twice per year. In roles where optimum performance is directly attached to your compensation, quarterly reports are more common.

You will also want to ask about the quality of the reviews. Are they informal check-ins, or formal meetings with your leadership team? The nature of these meetings should be important to you because the more seriously your leaders take your growth, the faster you will advance in your career.
11.
How do you set clear goals and targets for your employees?
An employer who can set clear expectations is the best kind of employer to have. You want to work for a company that can give you direction. When you have goals to work towards, you will be able to measure your success better and become a high performer.

Ask the interviewer about specific goals and targets. Avoid accepting a general answer. If an employer is unable to tell you precisely what their objectives are, this is a big red flag because they are likely just trying to find a warm body to put in a seat. This behavior is an indicator that you would not be joining a team of high performers.

Try to get examples of specific numbers, actions, and rewards they use in the workplace. This example could include your daily targets, examples of fun contests they may have in the office, and other ways they measure success and recognize accomplishments.
12.
What is the most critical function in this position?
Most job descriptions have a long list of responsibilities, must-haves, and nice-to-haves. When you ask the interviewer a question such as this one, you are asking them to narrow down what the most important function is in this role.

Once the interviewer gives you the reply, you will better be able to target your answers to that one critical function, or need. For instance, if you are applying to a marketing director position and the interviewer tells you that the most vital purpose in the role is to ensure that all projects move along at a smooth pace, then you know that project management is the most critical part. You can continue your interview focusing on your project management experience, or even your PM education. Also, you now have a solid idea of what you will be spending the bulk of your time on if hired.
13.
What are the next steps in your interview process?
For you to perform at your peak during your interviews, it's best if you know what to expect when it comes to the interview process. Knowing what is happening next, will help you to assess the preparation and research you will need to succeed in these meetings.

The interviewer should be able to give you an overview of who you will be meeting with, along with the estimated timeline between each of these interviews. Some organizations will have just one meeting, and some may have as many as 5+ interviews with different team members. This situation will all depend on the level of position for which you are interviewing.

If the process seems far too drawn out to fit in within your ideal timeline, you can say something like this: "Thank you for explaining the interview process to me. By my calculations, we would be in the final stages of interviewing in the next six weeks. I am seeking a role as soon as possible, so if I can accommodate dates closer together, I am happy to give you the flexibility you need to make that happen."
Rachelle's Answer
"Thank you for explaining the interview process to me. By my calculations, we would be in the final stages of interviewing in the next six weeks. I am seeking a role as soon as possible, so if I can accommodate dates closer together, I am happy to give you the flexibility you need to make that happen."
14.
Is there anything about my background that I can further clarify for you?
When you ask the interviewer a question like this, you are removing some of their opportunity to reject you for reasons that may not be clear or even accurate.

As a candidate, it is easy to unintentionally breeze over parts of your background and work history that may be more important than you thought.

The interviewer, if they are unclear on parts of your background, will then have the chance to back up and ask you for further clarification. You should ask this question in every single interview as it is incredibly useful!
15.
Is there any reason why you feel I would not be a good fit for this position?
Any time you are asking a question this targeted, there will be a risk of hearing something that you don't want to hear. Be sure that you are prepared to accept feedback on your application, your qualifications, or even your interviewing skills.

By asking this question, you are asking the interviewer to identify where your application is weak so that you have the opportunity to correct your reply or give a more precise answer on that particular subject.

Be sure to thank the interviewer for their feedback and then take some time to overcome their objection. For instance, if the interviewer says they feel that your Excel skills are not strong enough, you could say: "Thank you for that feedback. I am perhaps more humble in regards to my Excel skills than I should have been. I am currently ranked as an Intermediate user but will be enrolling in a three-week online program immediately to raise my skills to be Expert level."
Rachelle's Answer
"Thank you for that feedback. I am perhaps more humble in regards to my Excel skills than I should have been. I am currently ranked as an Intermediate user but will be enrolling in a three-week online program immediately to raise my skills to be Expert level."
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