MockQuestions

School Counselor Interview Questions

To help you prepare for your School Counselor interview, here are 35 interview questions and answer examples.

School Counselor was written by and updated on February 28th, 2019. Learn more here.

Question 1 of 35

As a counselor, how would you use your role to prevent violence in school?

How to Answer

Offer multiple solutions so the interviewer knows that you have considered different scenarios as you plan this action. Having enough options is important so you are ready for unexpected scenarios.



Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

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35 School Counselor Interview Questions & Answers

  • 1. As a counselor, how would you use your role to prevent violence in school?

      How to Answer

      Offer multiple solutions so the interviewer knows that you have considered different scenarios as you plan this action. Having enough options is important so you are ready for unexpected scenarios.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      1st Answer Example

      "For me, prevention is still better than cure. Because of this, I will ensure that information drive in the school is intensive across all grade levels. Students who are prone to being violent should know that we do not tolerate violence, while the rest should know that they can turn to the school for help and support should they be the object of violence. Apart from this, I will also encourage the implementation of school activities (e.g. sports, arts, music). Violence is a result of negative energy so I believe that if we keep students busy with productive activities, it will make them more positive individuals."

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Violence prevention programs and conflict resolution training/groups. I think being a positive, welcoming presence has a lot of value. And I have access to a crisis management plan that was developed by one of my professors who works in the field if such a program needs to be developed in the district."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      Great ideas--I've provided a suggestion for a slight rewording of your response in the "Revised Answer" section.

      "As a school counselor, I view myself as a meaningful source of knowledge and support in the area of violence prevention. I will develop and deliver violence prevention programs and conflict resolution training/groups, designed to help students express themselves in a healthy, positive way. I think that my positive, welcoming presence will also have a lot of value. Additionally, I have access to a crisis management plan that was developed by one of my professors who works in the field, if such a program needs to be developed in the district."

  • 2. What do you do to relieve stress?

      How to Answer

      You can be more candid when answering this. Interviewers do not want a robot so show a little of your fun side and maybe highlight activities that could show how well-rounded you are (e.g. sports, music, arts, etc.)

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      1st Answer Example

      "In between work or during the weekends, I hang out with my friends to watch a movie or try a new restaurant. Keeping myself active also helps so I go to the gym 3-4 times a week. However, when I have more time in my hands, I go out of town or out of the country to travel. It helps me recharge and really take my mind off work."

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I enjoy yoga, going to the gym, hiking, and of course spending time with my family, friends, and my dog. I love to travel, see new places, meet new people, and am eager to do some more of that as time permits."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      It's great that you have developed such a meaningful list of ways you care for yourself. Since this is a counseling role, you could also include a sentence or two about your personal values as they align with the practices of self-care, or why you value caring for yourself, so you can be in your best position to care for others.

  • 3. How would you handle an irate parent?

      How to Answer

      Working for a school means that you would also have to work with the parents. For questions like this, be sure to outline your answers according to your course of action and the expected output of said action. You should be able to illustrate clearly how you will manage situational questions.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      1st Answer Example

      "I will first ask the parent to calm down. After the parent calms down, I shall ask for his/her concern so I can start addressing them. It is important that during the discussion, I empathize with them and tell them that I understand where they are coming from yet still making sure that all their concerns are addressed truthfully and accordingly. However, if the parent does not calm down, I will respectfully but sternly communicate that being angry will not solve anything and so he/she has to calm down so we can discuss the matter as how mature adults should."

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I would first give the parent a safe place to calm down and once they have composed themselves, I would then ask what the problem is and listen to what they have to say. I would then work with the parent to try to come to a solution to their perceived problem."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Are there any additional steps that would be required, such as bringing in an Administrator or third party? If so, be sure to include that. Also, if this has happened in your career before, be sure to bring in your specific experience as an example.

      "I have worked with an upset parent in the past. I gave this parent a safe place to calm down and compose themselves. Then, I asked to hear a breakdown of the perceived issue so that I could gain an understanding of the most sensitive points. Once I had gained a full understanding of the issue, I pulled in an Administrator to help create a plan for resolution."

  • 4. How would you explain cultural differences to students?

      How to Answer

      Sensitive situations are tricky to address but always ensure that your answers are politically correct and impartial.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Culture varies around the world and is expressed in our values, beliefs, languages, and practices -- some are different and some are similar. As we learn about various differences and similarities, we begin to develop a rich appreciation for culture."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      Great; this response is very positive and strengths-focused. This exhibits an appreciation for the differences of others.

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  • 5. What is the difference between a therapist and a school counselor?

      How to Answer

      Research is key! Always prepare yourself to answer questions involving concepts in your field that could create confusion. You don't have to be too technical in the definition but it should be concise.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "School counselors have a broader role in that they work with students to assist with academic and career development as well as to support personal, social, and emotional well-being; school counselors have access to students on a daily basis and can address issues that arise at the moment; school counselors have a unique opportunity to help students in both a preventative and responsive manner. Therapists work with people to develop a specific treatment plan, address identified specific issues, usually weekly or bi-weekly over a period of time."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      You do a good job distinguishing the difference between the work of a therapist and that of a school counselor. You may consider including a sentence that shows your particular interest and enthusiasm for school counseling (being able to meet students in their daily setting, being able to support students both academically and personally, etc)

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  • 6. How do you keep yourself organized?

      How to Answer

      Time and records management are very important skills that you need to have. They are easier said than done so keep your answers short, practical and believable.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I use a digital calendar (necessary for meeting invites) and a planner (monthly and daily) to assist with meetings, appointments, and daily to-do lists; at times, and I use an alarm as a reminder. I like a neat workspace, and I take time each day to organize in such a way that everything has its place."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent response; it's clear that you're highly organized and have developed strategies that work well for you.

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  • 7. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

      How to Answer

      Most people find it difficult to visualise long-term plans. If you haven't decided on one yet, do not say something that you don't mean. Be truthful but keep your answers simple and believable. It would also help if your 5-year plan is still related to the field you are applying for.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "In 5 years, I still see myself as a school counselor, only with additional experience, so an improved school counselor. I have considered seeking a Ph.D. and am hopeful that I will be at least starting by then."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      I've suggested a slight rewording in the "Revised Answer" section, in hopes of highlighting your passion for this opportunity,

      "I am passionate about the field of school counseling, so in five years, I hope to still be practicing as a school counselor, only with additional experience, so as an improved school counseling. I have also considered seeking a Ph.D. in counseling to continue my own learning, so hopefully, I will be enrolled in a part-time Ph.D. program by then. I look forward to continuing to grow and develop as a school counselor."

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  • 8. What experiences have you had that make you feel capable of being a counselor?

      How to Answer

      This is somewhat similar to 'what influenced you to become a counsellor'. You can cite childhood experiences or probably something you did in college/past job that made you confident about being a counsellor.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "My early experiences, for example, in high school, showed me that counseling is a good fit for me as I was the one that friends and even acquaintances came to talk to about things going on in their lives. In fact, it still happens today, even while just shopping in the grocery store. More recent educational and professional experiences also make me feel capable of being a counselor-I believe practice makes me proficient."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      Great response; it's evident that you have a high level of empathy and others gravitate toward you and feel supported by you.

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  • 9. What would you do if a student told you they were touched inappropriately by a teacher?

      How to Answer

      Questions like this would also test your knowledge of the due process. It's not just about comforting the student but also being able to proceed with the right course of action especially if it will turn into an administrative/criminal offence such as sexual harassment or abuse.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "In this situation, the first thing I would do is contact my administrator and discuss the allegation with him/her. I would then assist in any way I could to ensure that proper procedures were followed (including contacting the police, informing parents, contacting a crisis outreach center, etc.) and that the student was kept safe and most importantly away from this teacher. I would follow up with my administrator in the days that followed and maintain confidentiality while also working with the parents of this student to ensure he/she gets the proper care, both physically and emotionally."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Highly professional response. If you have dealt with a situation like this in the past, you could mention that you have taken these steps, while maintaining complete confidentiality of course.

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  • 10. How would you divide your time between meeting the immediate needs of the students and keeping up with the paperwork?

      How to Answer

      Time Management is important in almost every job out there. Answer this question by simulating how you would go about a regular day at the office. That way, the interviewer will see how you prioritize your tasks. This manner of answering an interviewer's question also shows that you have the ability to plan.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "My first priority as a school counselor is to meet the immediate needs of the students and I would, therefore, make their welfare at school my priority above any paperwork I may need to complete. I would complete any paperwork necessary in between times that I meet with students, teachers, or parents. I would also utilize after school time to complete my paperwork obligations if necessary."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Kevin Downey

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Kevin Downey Reviewed the Above Answer

      Very good answer. Straightforward and shows off your great time-management capabilities. I've restructured and organized your response to convey a little more consistently in your approach. Remember, communication is everything in an interview. Having clear and direct communication, which feels consistent and structured will send the message that your work ethic is structured and consistent in your approach.

      "There’s always paperwork to perform, and reports to file, and meetings to hold. Sometimes it feels as if there isn’t enough time in the day, and you have to constantly re-prioritize, as most of a school counselor’s meetings are walk-ins. So, I maintain my first priority as a school counselor is to meet the immediate needs of the students and I would, therefore, make their welfare at school my priority above any paperwork I may need to complete. This also includes meeting with teachers and parents in addition to the student. I carefully manage my time to prevent rework so that I never lose track of what I was working on when priorities shift. On those days, which are more filled with impromptu meetings than others, I’ll utilize after school time when necessary to complete my paperwork obligations if there’s no room for flexibility elsewhere."

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  • 11. Who is your role model? Why do you look up to this person?

      How to Answer

      Interviewers want to know your motivator/s or inspiration/s. When you are asked this question, highlight a trait that you admire about your role model and share an experience where you used what you learned from that person.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "On a personal level, my mom is my role model. She helped me to develop a strong work ethic, to be self-sufficient, to be kind, and be self-reflective, all of these personal traits help me in my work as a counselor. On a professional level, my supervisor Samantha is my role model; she nurtured my love of research, encouraged me to trust my instincts, and to embrace my own personality and humor so that I can be authentic in my work with others."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent! You do a wonderful job of reflecting on individuals who have impacted your life personally and professionally. Your ability to connect the traits you've learned from these individuals back to important traits within the counseling profession is especially strong.

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  • 12. Can you walk us through a time when a case you handled failed? If you would be given the chance to redo it, what would you do differently?

      How to Answer

      Interviewers know that not all endeavours end up as a success. Do not be afraid to share failed experiences but always ensure to add what you learned from the experience and to share what you are doing so that you won't fail again in the future.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I recall having the opportunity to work with an elementary school student that I had initially started working with when he was in the 3rd grade. He had difficulty controlling his anger and would often take his frustrations out on peers and teachers verbally and sometimes physically. He did not like being told what to do and often times wanted to be left alone to do what he pleased. During my three years of working with this student before going off to middle school, I attempted to gauge his interests and build a solid relationship with him. I succeeded modestly on this front and saw his behaviors fluctuate over time. He had a lot of problems stemming from his home life, and although I tried to empathize with his situation, I feel that overall, his behaviors did not improve noticeably over the three years. In this regard, I feel I failed him to an extent. However, I do not think, if given the opportunity, that I would change any aspect of what I had done to help this student because every decision I made was to help guide him and get him to realize that a person can succeed despite the obstacles out of his/her control."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      It is excellent that you have taken accountability for the outcome while standing behind your approach. This is exactly what the interviewer would be looking for.

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  • 13. What experiences have you had in working with special education students?

      How to Answer

      This is a question that you have to be brutally honest about. Special Education students have specific needs so you have to be transparent with how much experience you have. If you have a lot, then best to give an extensive explanation. Otherwise, be honest but say that you are open to learning what you do not know.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I'm currently working with children in a moderate to severe classroom as part of my school social work internship. I'm helping with engagement in class, social-emotional learning using the Second Step curriculum, and addressing some behavioral issues using social stories. I am working with students individually to learn and practice skills such as identifying and expressing emotions and using coping skills to manage intense feelings."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      You do a great job of highlighting your current experience with special education students. The only feedback I have is explicitly mentioning your experience with IEP's, if you have any (example: participating in IEP meetings or contributing the writing n IEP) as this often important in the role of a school counselor.

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  • 14. Why should we hire you?

      How to Answer

      This is your chance to highlight your best assets and what you can offer to the school. It is also an advantage if your beliefs or values are aligned with the school's so you can use it as leverage. However, be conscious of your tone. You want to sound confident of your skills, but not arrogant.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I believe you should hire me because I personify all of the traits necessary to be an effective school counselor and have a genuine interest in building relationships with students, parents, teachers, and administrators to benefit students academically, socially and emotionally. I also believe my personal experiences and my experience as a classroom teacher and counselor, who has worked with every age group from Kindergarten to high school, will further benefit students."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Well structured answer with very good points. Try to think of other features that those competing against you for the job, would not possess. What is unique just to you?

      "I believe you should hire me because, unlike my peers or other school counselors I have met, I... (insert personal mission statement, continued education or training you have completed, an area where you are a subject matter expert, etc.)..."

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  • 15. How do you manage your time?

      How to Answer

      When it comes to prioritizing, remember that apart from importance, urgency is also a major consideration. Don't forget to throw in an activity that you do for yourself to show that you make time for your well-being.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "My time at school is dedicated first and foremost to the immediate needs of students while at school. The majority of my time at school is dedicated to meeting with students or working with them in the classroom setting. If I am not meeting with students, I may be contacting parents or community resources to help students in other ways not necessarily connected with the school. Any remaining time is dedicated to completing any necessary paperwork or keeping track/setting up meetings to develop FBA/BSP's or 504 plans. I always make it a priority to be flexible, as any variety of situations can occur during a school day that I may need to attend to right away."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Very good that you added the fact that you can pivot in your day. Your response shows that you are structured yet flexible.

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  • 16. What is your experience with parenting programs?

      How to Answer

      A job that involves students would involve their parents. It would also help to research the general profile of the students in the school so you have an idea of the kind of parents you will encounter (e.g. middle class/upper class, rural/suburban) That way, you can tailor fit your answer depending on their profile.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "In the past, we had a parenting program that the social worker and I organized quarterly. Sometimes we would preset topics and other times we would invite guest speakers to present on Signs of Suicide, Bullying, or Internet safety."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Cindy Ramsey

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Cindy Ramsey Reviewed the Above Answer

      Great. Give an example of a specific parenting program, your contribution, and the outcome. This will help the interviewer envision your skills and apply them to his/her workplace.

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  • 17. What is the difference between Counseling and Coaching?

      How to Answer

      When answering technical or theoretical questions, it is important to create an outline of your answer to demonstrate an organized train of thought. Provide concise answers and throw in an example to clarify the definition.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "A counselor is educated and trained to provide a safe, supportive environment for clients to explore various issues. A coach does not require formal education and provides assistance with goal-oriented issues."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      You do a great job describing the difference between a counselor and a coach!

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  • 18. You witnessed a bullying incident. How will you address the situation?

      How to Answer

      Do not be afraid to use 'I' when answering situational questions. It is important to demonstrate what YOU would actually do, and not just provide a theoretical answer that would 'sound good' to the interviewer. Apart from providing solutions for the current problem, also offer a 'moving forward' strategy that would prevent this from happening again. It shows that you have the foresight and the ability to act on it.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I would intervene, using the TCI (Therapeutic Crisis Intervention) skills that I have learned to de-escalate the situation and invite them both to come with me to speak with me separately. I would support both students, offer my help/assistance to resolving any conflict, document incidents, report as per school policy, contact parents to inform them of the situation, explain the process regarding disciplinary actions to the bully. It may help to assess bullying in the school. For example, the school might benefit from a bully prevention program (training for staff and guidance for students), establishing and enforcing rules regarding bullying, and increasing adult supervision in certain areas."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent response! It's evident that you've given thoughtful consideration to how you would address bullying, and you clearly walk your interviewers through the steps that you would take to ensure safety and offer support.

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  • 19. How do you handle criticism?

      How to Answer

      Criticisms can either be negative or constructive, so it would help if you could share an experience for both. This would show your ability to discern the feedback that you get from others and how you act on what you hear from them.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I appreciate constructive criticism as I believe it is an opportunity to learn and grow in both my personal and professional lives; in fact, I ask for feedback periodically in order to gauge what I am doing well and what I can improve. For example, one criticism that I can remember that I received is that I asked for some clarification about something that I thought was "vague," and I was told that characterizing something as "vague" might be insulting to some people. I thanked them for their feedback and have made a more concerted effort to choose my words more carefully."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      It's clear that you're self-reflective and open to feedback. The specific example that you provided was helpful in illustrating how you exhibit an openness to constructive criticism.

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  • 20. Why would you make a great school counselor?

      How to Answer

      It is not just about telling the interviewer what your skills are or the positive traits you have. This question allows you to raise the bar high and communicate to the interviewer that you can offer more than what is expected.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Other than my educational achievements and experience, I feel I would make a great school counselor because I have a natural ability to connect with people through positive avenues, such as humor, in order to build a relationship. I am inclined to listen rather than talk and find that my personal experiences growing up as an adopted, only child in a single parent home, benefit the students I work with, regardless of age or gender."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Fantastic way to draw back to your educational qualifications while also highlighting how your own personal and professional experiences will leverage you into a successful career as a school counselor. Perfect response.

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  • 21. What would you do when a student tells you that he or she wants to drop out of school?

      How to Answer

      Normally, scenarios like this would require school staff to respond a certain way. What is important to remember when asked a question similar to this one is to also show consideration for the emotions of the student.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "If a student were to tell me that he/she wanted to drop out of school, my intial inclination would be to ask what events or circumstances have specifically led to this conclusion. I would then ask if they had a plan for what they would do if they did indeed choose to leave school. Then, based on their answer, I would help to provide them with alternative options and work with them to understand all of the options they have before making a final decision."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent response. Thorough and insightful without being too wordy.

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  • 22. Can you share an experience when you went above and beyond to help a student?

      How to Answer

      Employers want to hire people who can go the extra mile. For this question, just cite an experience that you feel is beyond your normal scope of duty but you did wholeheartedly, which produced a favorable or positive result. Share how you felt during that time, and if you received any commendations for that action.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I had a student come to me looking for a work-study job. Unfortunately, he did not have financial aid and didn't qualify for a work-study job. I really wanted to help him because he was a special needs students who had been trying to find work, but had nothing on his resume. So, using my network, I found him another job on campus, not work study. It worked out well - his supervisor was very happy with him. His mother was so appreciative she wrote me a nice letter, and I was just happy I could help him."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      This is a terrific example to share of a time you went the extra mile to help out a student. It sounds like your assistance had a significant impact on the student, and his family. Great job!

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  • 23. What makes you most passionate about being a school counselor?

      How to Answer

      This is easy because your answer should come from the heart, as cliche as that may sound.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I have education and experience in academic and in mental-health/emotional counseling. As a school counselor, I love that I can be there for kids in both capacities, that I can be a positive influence in the lives of children."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Stephanie Cafaro

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Stephanie Cafaro Reviewed the Above Answer

      Great response; it's evident that you're passionate about supporting students academically, socially, and emotionally.

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  • 24. Describe a challenging experience while you were counseling a student. What did you do to overcome it?

      How to Answer

      Similar to the other questions, the basic guide to answering situational questions is to describe the circumstance, explain your course of action and then the result of your action. Answering this way also shows the interviewer that you know how to organize your thoughts.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "There was a time when I was counseling a student who did not want to talk with me and was difficult in our counseling sessions. I continued to question the student learning more about the student's interests, hobbies, or outside activities. I built a rapport with the student by greeting in the morning or in the lunchroom. Showed interest in the student's life at school and outside of school. Eventually, the student warmed up to me and worked with me in a more positive manner."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Cindy Ramsey

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Cindy Ramsey Reviewed the Above Answer

      Good start. The example provides good information about your problem-solving skills and judgment.

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  • 25. For you, what is the role of a school counselor?

      How to Answer

      It is always best if you read and understand the job description because some schools may require more of a specific task than the other. By reading the job description, you'll be able to focus your answer on the highlights of the job.

      Written by Rachelle Enns on February 28th, 2019

      User-Submitted Answer

      "In my opinion, a school counselor needs to be an empathetic and objective listener who will advocate for student success and not judge students for their mistakes, but instead, work with them to realize that they have the power to make positive decisions everyday that will ensure their ongoing success as they get older."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Very good response! If there are specific responsibilities mentioned in the job posting, be sure to include them as well.

      "I agree with your organization that a school counselor needs to be an empathetic and objective advocate for student success. You even say so in your school's mission statement, which caught my eye. As a school counselor, I am acutely aware that I need to work with students to help them realize they have the power to make positive decisions every day which will ensure their ongoing success."

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  • 26. How do you try to counsel students who are known to cause violence?

      How to Answer

      The format of your answer is similar to when you are asked about handling difficult/challenging clients - define the circumstance, explain your course of action and then state your desired result. This time, you just have to tailor fit your manner of answering to the type of student you are being asked about.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "When I work with students who have a tendency towards violence whenever they are emotional, I first and foremost try to create a safe, quiet space where they can deescalate in the moment of emotional outburst. Once I have given he/she time to calm themselves, I often ask what initially triggered the emotional response and get the person to provide alternative solutions to the problem they perceive, other than to use violence. I work with students to get them to realize that they have the power to make decisions that will result in better outcomes if they can learn to control their impulses and take a moment to think before reacting to any given situation. It is a process that takes time and patience and can only be achieved if I make the effort to form a trusting bond with students."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Empowering those who feel powerless is an excellent point to minimizing violent behavior and emotion outbursts. Perfect response.

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  • 27. What influenced you to be a school counselor?

      How to Answer

      This should be easy for you but remember to always link your answers to important aspects of the job you're applying for.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I knew that I always wanted to work with children. My undergraduate degree was in psychology. After I graduated, I worked as a case manager for the local mental health center. While I was there, I worked with students from many different schools and wanted to be in a more consistent position to make more of an impact. I also worked with school counselors and loved how the students relied on them."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Being in a more consistent position is excellent reasoning for the change of focus. This is a nice, clear answer that, once again, really shows off your passion for making a difference in the lives of children.

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  • 28. Why did you choose to apply in our school?

      How to Answer

      You don't have to memorize the history of the school to ace this part. You can mention what the school is known for (e.g. 'It is among the top private schools in the district', 'It is known for its stellar program for research') or focus on what they stand for (e.g. vision, mission, and core values). You can use this opportunity to mention your personal values that are aligned with theirs.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "The school has made improvements in relation to academic standards and progress. I believe the school is implementing programs to help students achieve even more academically while providing support for the emotional and physical needs of students via athletics. I am familiar with the demographics of the student population at the school and have worked with similar students in the past."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent response! You have done your homework on the school and its initiatives, which is exactly what the interviewer would like to see.

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  • 29. Can you share an experience when you had to work on a project with teachers? What was your role and how did your group go about the task?

      How to Answer

      Share an experience where you took an active role in a team. Emphasise on what you personally did or contributed, not just what happened to the activity in general. Questions like this allow interviewers to see if you have leadership potential or if you can work well with others. After describing the experience, you may also share how you felt about the whole endeavour.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "As a German teacher, we always celebrated Foreign Language Week. I worked with the foreign language department to create activities for the week. Specifically, I was in charge of German day. Together we came up with interesting and enjoyable cultural ideas for the week that the kids took part in."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      Good answer! However, it is lacking in the details that would make it more engaging and memorable to the interviewer. Are you able to flesh out the story by being more specific about the types of activities you personally created for German day? Also, consider discussing how you and the others in the group divided the work and assigned various tasks to ensure the success of the project. Behavioral-based interview questions like this are best answered using the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) method. Organizing your response using this framework will ensure that you provide the interviewer with the right amount of information and detail to form a compelling answer. We have a guide that you may find helpful - https://www.mockquestions.com/articles/5 Behavioral Based Interview Questions You Should Prepare For/

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  • 30. What steps would you take if a student told you he or she was being abused?

      How to Answer

      Sensitive cases like abuse, that have legal implications, need to be dealt with seriously. When answering, consider all sides of the case such as the well being of the student, the protocols of the school and your moral responsibility to protect this child from danger.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "If a student were to report to me that they were being abused, I would first encourage the student to elaborate as much as possible regarding the alleged abuse and ask questions such as: Who has been abusing you? When did it occur? Is the abuse ongoing?

      I would then ask the student to show any bruises (if in an appropriate place) and I would take pictures of any bruises for documentation that I would provide to authorities if necessary. I would then contact the child welfare office and report an alleged abuse and provide any details they may ask for and I would adhere to their recommendations as far a contacting police. I would then contact my administrator and inform them of the siutaiton and follow up in the days after the intial report to ensure the students safety both at school and after school."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Your training in this area is apparent. Very good response, with highly specific action steps. Perfect answer.

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  • 31. What would you do if a student tells you that they want to end their life?

      How to Answer

      This is a question that you should tread very carefully. It is best to highlight that you will engage more help to support the child while you are on suicide watch.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I would make sure that the student and I were one-on-one in a quiet, safe environment and then I would initially ask what situation or circumstance has made him/her feel the need to end their life. I would then conduct an informal assessment to gauge the students level of severity in relation to suicide and ask questions such as: Have you made a specific plan to end your life? If yes, have you written it down somewhere? Do you have the item you plan to use to end your life? Based on their answers, I would ensure the student remained isolated and away from all objects that may be potentially fatal and make a call to my administrator so that a suicide crisis team may be called to help this student further. I would continue to stay with the student until given proper assistance and I would follow up in the days afterward to check on the safety of the student."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent outline of events and attention to detail. The interviewer will appreciate the step-by-step actions that you would take in this situation. The confidence you exude in your answer will set you apart.

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  • 32. What is your greatest weakness? What are you doing to improve it?

      How to Answer

      I know it's difficult to share a weakness because you might feel that it will turn the interviewer off. But interviewers know that nobody is perfect. Everybody has flaws. It's a matter of how aware you are of it and what you are doing to address it.



      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I am not always comfortable working collaboratively with others and sometimes procrastinate with tasks that I perceive are difficult. In the past, I have learned to be self-reliant and have not trusted others to come through for me when asked. This is a result of being let down time and time again when having to work collaboratively with others.

      However, as I have had the opportunity to experience positive outcomes in relation to collaborative efforts during my time in education, I have learned to trust those I work with because we are all professionals and are working towards a common goal and that belief has allowed me to trust others in the workplace."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Although very honest, this response may be too transparent, creating red flags for the interviewer. Try to focus on the parts that are less negative sounding (being let down time and time again sounds like you're often disappointed in others). Try putting a bigger spotlight on what you are doing to improve your areas of weakness.

      "I have learned to be self-reliant in the workplace, even at times when it wouldn't hurt to ask for a bit of help. I enjoy co-worker collaboration and look forward to more positive experiences when it comes to leaning on my team."

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  • 33. What is your greatest strength?

      How to Answer

      Choose to highlight a strength that can be useful to the position you're applying for. That way, the interviewer will have an idea of how that can help you fulfill the job.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I feel my greatest strength as a counselor and as a person is the ability to listen and empathize with situations that can arise as a young person. I believe the best avenue towards helping anyone is to make them feel like their voice matters and that someone cares for them. Listening to someone else's perspective can be a powerful tool in building trust, which is key to helping anyone solve their problems."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Very good strength to highlight as a school counselor. Bringing your personal beliefs into your response is a nice touch.

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  • 34. What is the role of the school counselor in relation to teachers, parents, and administrators?

      How to Answer

      This is the interviewer's way of communicating to you that being a school counselor involves other stakeholders, not just the student.

      School counselors are not only for the students. As such, it is important to prepare yourself by researching the typical concerns of teachers/parents/administrators and the types of activities that could encourage their engagement and participation.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "As a school counselor, my role within a school is to advocate for all students. This means that I need to be able to work collaboratively with all teachers and help to implement behavior interventions in the classroom that can benefit all students. I also need to be a good communicator with parents so that they are aware of any issues in school which may be impacting their child in perceived negative way, whether that be academically, socially or behaviorally. I also need to be in regular contact with my administrators so that they are aware of any student issues which may need additional resources or guidance from a disiplinary standpoint."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Concise response, addressing all three avenues: teachers, parents, and administrators. Good work!

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  • 35. Why did you choose a career as a counselor?

      How to Answer

      Interviewers want to know a candidate's propensity to stay in a job for a long time. By asking this, they are able to gauge if this is a career that the candidate sees himself or herself doing for a long time or if it is a fleeting interest. Be genuine when answering this question since interviewers can easily tell if you are simply saying nice things to get the job. It helps to add a personal story that could solidify your answer.

      Written by Ryan Brown on August 12th, 2014

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I began my educational career as a secondary teacher teaching English Language Arts and then moved on to working with middle school students. As a teacher, I was interested in not only teaching my students but getting to know them as people. Unfortunately, as a teacher, I did not get as much of an opportunity to get to know all of my students well. As a counselor, I am able to form lasting relationships with students and see them as more than just students, but people with problems and issues that contribute to their struggles and successes in the school setting that encompass their lives outside of a school setting. I am able to better understand my students as a counselor because I have more time to know every aspect of their lives."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      You have painted a great picture here, walking the interviewer through your career and what has landed you where you are today. Great response.

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