Interviews Questions by Career
Interviews Questions by Company
Interviews Questions by Topic
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Math Teacher Interview
Questions

25 Questions and Answers by Ryan Brown

Updated September 29th, 2020
Job Interviews     Careers     Education    
Question 1 of 25
What do you like most about teaching math?
View Answer
How to Answer
Think about the most rewarding moments of teaching math, something that makes you feel immensely accomplished. Feel free to add more to your personal story as the interviewer wants to know you more about you than what's written on your resume.
1000s of Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Answer Examples
1.
What do you like most about teaching math?
Think about the most rewarding moments of teaching math, something that makes you feel immensely accomplished. Feel free to add more to your personal story as the interviewer wants to know you more about you than what's written on your resume.

Ryan's Answer
"I like teaching math because I love seeing the lightbulb moment when my students finally understand a problem they've worked so hard to solve. Math is really goal-oriented in that way because students are working to arrive at a right answer. There are multiple ways. Sometimes they they give up, are disappointed in themselves, or don't realize they've missed a step here and there. But the final moment when they're able to walk through it themselves and arrive at the right answer really makes me feel like theirs and my hard work is worth it."
2.
What do you feel is the most effective way to communicate with parents?
The answer to this question varies depending on your communication experience and style. Usually, good parent-teacher communication is oriented at open discussion and problem-solving if the parent or teacher has concerns about their child.

Ryan's Answer
"I prefer to have open and honest communication. I often ask parents first about how they feel their child's progress is, and then provide my perspective. Giving them a chance to share brings down their defenses and creates a more open channel of communication."
3.
What is your homework philosophy?
Good answers here will focus on consistency and self-reflection, to some extent. Show the interviewer that you're not a lenient teacher and expect students to be responsible.

Ryan's Answer
"My homework philosophy is: do it to the best of your ability. If there's a problem you can't solve, work halfway through it, show your work, and mark it so you can bring your questions to class. If there are answers in the book and they're asked to check, I do expect them to check and go through their work again so we can use class time efficiently and so students can keep track of their own progress."
4.
What are your most effective teaching strategies?
Talk about your strong suit in teaching. Answers can range from your continuity to your strict discipline, your relaxed nature, or your creative ideas. This question reveals a lot about your personality.

Ryan's Answer
"I find that a consistent format works well for my students. Middle schoolers tend to be rowdy and unfocused, so they need a lot of structure throughout the class. I go through a set lesson plan with homework review, teach a concept, have them practice with an interactive activity, assign homework, and end the day with games to bring their spirits up. This way, they know what to anticipate and have something to look forward to while also knowing what's expected of them."
5.
Tell me about a lesson that didn't go well and why. How might you improve that lesson?
Again, there's no right answer here. It's important to self-reflect and be honest about what you could improve upon.

Ryan's Answer
"When I first started teaching, I had a lot of trouble with discipline, and once my class was so noisy that I yelled at my whole class and had to leave the classroom temporarily. I don't think I knew how to gain the students' respect yet because I wasn't experienced enough. Later on in my teaching I learned not to lose my temper and that it's a good idea to take a break or do something else if the atmosphere of the class isn't great."
6.
What is your greatest strength? How can you use it to benefit our students?
The interviewer wants to know how you can contribute to the students as a whole.

Good qualities for teachers include:
- patience: persistently explaining to students of different levels
- creativity: thinking of different ways to approach one problem
- hardworking: spending time preparing detailed lessons
- constant follow-up with students' progress
- flexible: able to adapt when class doesn't go as planned

Ryan's Answer
"I think my greatest strength is creativity. Some of my students really struggle with abstract math concepts and I incorporate figures, role-play, drawing, building with shapes, or animations to help them understand concepts."
7.
What are your plans for continuing your professional growth?
The interviewer wants to know how you will continue to advance your career. If you have plans to go back to school, you can discuss those, and if not, talk about an area of math teaching that you're interested in exploring.

Ryan's Answer
"I'd like to teach across the board to students of different levels. Most of my experience has been with middle schoolers and I'd really like to teach elementary school math to gain more experience."
8.
What rules do you have for your classroom?
Try to come up with a set of rules that facilitates a fun but respectful and responsible learning environment.

Ryan's Answer
"My classroom rules are: show up to class, do the homework, check your work, and follow the techniques taught in class. I tell my students it's okay to do things their way if they've already learned the concept before, but try the method I provide because it may be faster and more accurate, and maybe they'd learn a method they didn't know about before."
9.
How do you get students engaged in the problem solving process?
There are many ways to get students to become engaged in the math solving process. Good ways to motivate students include a reward system to keep track of progress, or group work by teaming up different leveled students together.

Ryan's Answer
"I think the best way I've used to get students to be more engaged is to put them in groups and set up a problem solving competition over a semester. I think a little positive competition is necessary and a good motivator. Throughout the semester the group will work together to do worksheets, projects, reports, and peer assessments together. This helps students feel like they're part of a group and not left to solve problems on theri own."
10.
What skills and technologies are you most interested in improving upon or learning?
Keep up with new technology and talk to your fellow teacher friends. There are a variety tools and techniques via Khan Academy and iTunes U.

Here are some educational apps:
- Math Bingo
- Monkey Math School Sunshine
- Mathemagics
- Math Drills Lite
- Math Fact Master

Ryan's Answer
"I think I'd eventually like to use iPads in the classroom. I want to make more of my lessons paper-free and more interactive. I find that most of my students can actually process the information better when it's on the tablet rather than on paper just by presenting it differently."
11.
How would you make math class great for a lower-level student who feels bummed about their math ability?
Lower-level students typically lack confidence, so most of the work here is on encouragement rather than teaching a specific math skill.

Ryan's Answer
"I spend a lot of time rewarding small successes. My students who aren't great at math usually feel like they're far from their target scores, but what they don't realize is that Rome wasn't built in a day. Every extra problem they get right is worth celebrating. I try to encourage them that way so they keep trying. I'll also emphasize the importance of accuracy over speed because some students are missing problems because they're rushing rather than because they don't understand the material."
12.
Give an example of a situation in which you made math exciting for your students.
Math can be tough and boring at times. Think of a situation in which you exercised your creativity through a game, simulation, a time when you brought your students outdoors, or drew a picture, or played a video - anything to demonstrate that you can think outside the box.

Ryan's Answer
"One of the most exciting classes I remember is when I put the class into groups and used dominoes to teach them multiplication. It was active and you could see the students' eyes sparkle when they got the right answer. Some were just happy sitting on the ground lining up the dominoes. It was much more effective than doing board work."
13.
Which math subject is your favorite to teach and why?
Show off your expertise a little here! Be modest but reveal your strengths.

Ryan's Answer
"I think multiplication is probably my favorite because i can use a variety of tools like marbles, blocks, or other interactive math games for students to practice with. I also like it because it's practical and sometimes I'll set up real-life scenarios for students to use what they've learned and it's all of fun for me and them."
14.
What is your greatest weakness? What are you doing to improve upon it?
Be honest, but give yourself an opportunity to turn the negative into a positive down the road. Show that you are willing to work on this teaching weakness, or indirectly show how one of your strengths can make up for that weakness.

Ryan's Answer
"My biggest weakness is probably impatience. I tend to get frustrated with students sometimes when I'm explaining a concept or if they don't understand what they missed on a math problem. But over the years I've learned to get more creative and be persistent with helping them figure out the missing pieces. I realized that sometimes we're not able to meet our teaching goal for the day but it's possible they'll get a better picture of the concept next week after they've learned other parts of it."
15.
Share with me what you think a good piece of mathematics is - something you really like.
This is a completely open-response question. It could be as simple as a multiplication trick or as complicated as a calculus formula. Share something your students have benefited from.

Ryan's Answer
"When I was teaching middle school math, we had a lesson on adding and subtracting positive and negative numbers and my students had difficulty remembering which result was positive and negative. So I came up with a cute mnemonic for my students to memorize: positive means love and negative means hate. So if we love to love, then it's positive. If we love to hate, then it's negative. If we hate to love, it's still negative, but we if we hate to hate, then it's positive. I've been using that for years!"
More Interview Q&As
Explore expert tips and resources to be more confident in your next interview.
Behavioral
Common
Phone
Tough
Leadership
All Interview Topics
All Career Q&As
Suggested Career
Interview Q&As
Continue practicing by visiting these similar question sets
Elementary Teacher
GED Teacher
High School Teacher
Postsecondary Teachers
Social Studies Teacher
Teacher
25 Math Teacher Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Interview Questions
  1. What do you like most about teaching math?
  2. What do you feel is the most effective way to communicate with parents?
  3. What is your homework philosophy?
  4. What are your most effective teaching strategies?
  5. Tell me about a lesson that didn't go well and why. How might you improve that lesson?
  6. What is your greatest strength? How can you use it to benefit our students?
  7. What are your plans for continuing your professional growth?
  8. What rules do you have for your classroom?
  9. How do you get students engaged in the problem solving process?
  10. What skills and technologies are you most interested in improving upon or learning?
  11. How would you make math class great for a lower-level student who feels bummed about their math ability?
  12. Give an example of a situation in which you made math exciting for your students.
  13. Which math subject is your favorite to teach and why?
  14. What is your greatest weakness? What are you doing to improve upon it?
  15. Share with me what you think a good piece of mathematics is - something you really like.
  16. What do you have that would enhance our teaching staff?
  17. How would you challenge the slow learner and the advanced learner within the same class?
  18. What kind of students do you like to work with? What type of students could you teach most effectively?
  19. Other than tests, how do you assess student learning?
  20. What makes you unique as a math teacher?
  21. What three words would your students use to describe you?
  22. Tell me about a lesson that went well and why.
  23. What was the most frustrating thing that happened to you as a teacher?
  24. Tell me about someone who has influenced your own education and educational career.
  25. Why did you decide to become a math teacher?
Disclaimer
Our interview questions and answers are created by experienced recruiters and interviewers. These questions and answers do not represent any organization, school, or company on our site. Interview questions and answer examples and any other content may be used else where on the site. We do not claim our questions will be asked in any interview you may have. Our goal is to create interview questions and answers that will best prepare you for your interview, and that means we do not want you to memorize our answers. You must create your own answers, and be prepared for any interview question in any interview.
Learn more about what we believe >
Read our Terms of Use for more information >