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McGraw-Hill Education Interview
Questions

29 Questions and Answers by Carly Zucker

Updated August 13th, 2018 | Carly Zucker is an Instructional Designer who creates training for higher education, K-12 and organizations, with an additional background in corporate recruiting.
Question 1 of 29
If you could start your career over again, what direction would you take?
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How to Answer
A hiring manager will be able to tell a lot about your personality by learning about your other career interests. If you could do anything over, what would you do, and why? It's okay if it is not related to your current career, you are allowed to have other interests.
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Top 25 McGraw-Hill Education Interview Questions with Full Content
1.
If you could start your career over again, what direction would you take?
A hiring manager will be able to tell a lot about your personality by learning about your other career interests. If you could do anything over, what would you do, and why? It's okay if it is not related to your current career, you are allowed to have other interests.

Carly's Answer #1
"I certainly do not regret the direction I have taken my career; however, if I had to completely start over in a new direction I would likely pursue a degree in Mechanical Engineering and become an Engineer. Both of my parents were Engineers and they seemed to have a very fulfilling career. I remember my father taking me to the plant one day for a tour and I was amazed. I enjoy analytics and research which I tend to do a lot of in my role as an educator."
Carly's Answer #2
"I am very satisfied with the direction my career has taken. If I could change anything I would perhaps have furthered my education to include a Masters' degree in Marketing. I hope to someday achieve this."
2.
What questions do you have for me?
It's always a great idea to have questions ready for the interviewer. Review the company website and other online resources to ensure the questions you are asking are not mundane, or redundant. The last thing an interviewer wants to hear is a list of questions you could have found the answers to from a simple Google search.

Carly's Answer #1
"Here are some sample questions:

- When would you like to have this position filled?
- How long has this role been vacant?
- Is this a replacement search or a newly created role?
- How do employees give back to others?
- What changes has the company experienced in the past year?
- What is one of the companies goals for this year or the next 5 years?
- What is your favorite part about working here?
- What is the facility's primary goal for this position in the next 12 months?
- Is there anything from my background and experience that I can clarify for you?
- What do you see as the biggest change in this industry over the past 3 years?
- Is there any reason why you would not hire me?"
Carly's Answer #2
"Thank you for asking - I do have a few questions. What is the number one thing that McGraw-Hill Education values the most when developing curriculum? In addition, what types of career growth opportunities would follow this position? And lastly, what is your favorite piece of curriculum that McGraw-Hill Education has created?"
3.
Tell me something about yourself that I wouldn't know from reading your resume.
The interviewer would like to get to know you apart from what is written on your resume. You are certainly not obligated to discuss personal matters such as your kids, or relationship status, for instance. Stick with a couple of fun facts to show the interviewer that you are a real person, too. Your answer should be unique so that you are a memorable candidate!

Focus on special non-work related skills or hobbies. For example, you might share that you enjoy beat-boxing or making origami swans. Maybe you are a trained SCUBA diver. Be prepared for the interviewer to stop you and ask you to perform your skill on the spot when it's possible! (This will make you unforgettable!)

Carly's Answer #1
"I love to travel and I have been to 10 countries in the last 8 years. I am a big foodie so I always love documenting what I eat and writing about it on my blog. You can learn so much about a culture from its cuisine."
Carly's Answer #2
"I am bilingual in Spanish and have some proficiency in French and Italian, too. I know that McGraw-Hill Education has offices around the world, which is really cool. I also am a huge Harry Potter fan and could pretty much quote each book to you!"
4.
How do you handle stress on the job?
Are you someone who is able to handle stress on the job? How do you manage the stressful times? What are your go to strategies? Talk to the interviewer about your ability to manage pressure in the workplace.

Carly's Answer #1
"I handle stress very well and when you call my references, they will attest to this fact. When I am under pressure on the job, I focus on the task at hand and make sure to not get distracted. Staying on deadline is very helpful and I will delegate when necessary to alleviate some stress. I will also reach out to my supervisor for advice if needed."
Carly's Answer #2
"Stress is part of any demanding job and I embrace it to the fullest. I take good care of myself personally and prioritize my workload to maintain a healthy balance in my stress levels. Even a deep breath or two can lower my stress levels."
5.
What are your salary expectations?
The best way to discuss your salary expectations are to use your current earnings as an example. Be open, and honest. Transparency is the best choice when salary based questions arise. If available, look at the salary range that they are offering for the position.

Carly's Answer #1
"Currently, I earn a base salary of $45,000 per year plus a potential 20% annual bonus. Last year my earnings were $52,000 and I would like to stay in the same range or slightly higher."
Carly's Answer #2
"I am currently making $40,000 per year. I am looking for compensation that is aligned with the role and provides opportunity for growth. Does your company do annual reviews to assess performance?"
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