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Cardiovascular Technologist Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns
Updated December 15th, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Job Interviews     Careers     Health    

Question 1 of 30

When have you worked among a diverse group of people?

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1.

When have you worked among a diverse group of people?

Diversity and inclusion is a hot topic, and now, the interviewer wants to see that you will be able to contribute to the workplace culture they have so carefully crafted. Discuss how you accustomed to working with a very large or diverse team of individuals. Perhaps everyone on your multi-disciplinary team comes from a differed educational background. Or, maybe you work with a significant range of patients on a daily basis, from all walks of life. Assure the interviewer that you can handle an environment that offers diversity.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"The clinic where I currently work has an extensive patient demographic. This diversity keeps me on my toes during rounds. Everyone's needs are different. I have to be sensitive to varying cultures, genders, and religions. It has stretched me as a medical professional, and I wouldn't have it any other way."

Heather's Answer #2

"I have worked with diverse groups of people most of my medical career, including my time in college. I am most comfortable, and happy, in an environment the embraces diversity, because it offers a great learning opportunity."

2.

Has anyone in particular been helpful to you in your growth as a cardiovascular professional?

The interviewer wants to know whether you've formed strong professional relationships in your past work and educational environments. Discuss anyone who has inspired passion in you and mention how you appreciate learning from others. If you seek continual growth in the form of a mentor, or continued education opportunities, this is a great time to mention those initiatives.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"I have remained in close contact with my general sciences professor. She is the person who recommended I check out a career in cardiovascular, specifically. After my father suffered a heart attack, she knew the appreciation that grew in me, for the cardiovascular field. She sends me new resources and articles frequently, which are always helpful tools."

Heather's Answer #2

"My father has been helpful in my career growth, as he is a cardiologist. His passion for the patients he helps is what sparked my interest in the medical field. He has always encouraged me to work harder, to continue educating myself, and strive to be the best that I can be in my career."

3.

How did your college experience prepare you for a career in the cardiovascular field?

This question is a common one for new graduates. One way to ace this question is to take note of the unique skills and characteristics requested in the job posting. If the employer is looking for a self-starter and organizational whiz, you can touch on how your formal education taught you a great deal about management and motivation of self. Another approach is to discuss the college classes that influenced you or interested you the most.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"My college experience prepared me for a lucrative career by offering many positive interactions with fellow students, professors, and internship supervisors. Not only did I learn the necessary skills to work in cardiovascular, but also the nuances of clear communication, organization, and self-motivation."

Heather's Answer #2

"I have always been a strong student when it comes to chemistry and physics, but biology was not always my strongest suit. My biology professor was incredible and how she taught resonated with me. I gained an incredible amount of knowledge and insight that has helped me succeed in my role as a cardiovascular tech."

4.

How do you keep morale high when work gets stressful and you experience low moments?

We all experience stress, so it's important not to answer this question stating you don't experience work stress at all. The interviewer wants to see that you can thrive and continue to motivate yourself through challenging days or situations. Discuss where you draw your strength and energy. If possible, mention a time when you came out on top of a profoundly difficult situation. Talk about what you learned through the situation.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"To keep morale high, even during the toughest moments, I never forget to laugh. A person can find the lightheartedness in any situation so, that is where I tend to go. I take my job seriously; however, I do not take myself too seriously. I remain open to learning opportunities and am unafraid to ask for help when I feel that I am drowning in work and responsibilities."

Heather's Answer #2

"One of my favorite past supervisors taught me to celebrate the small wins along the way. Doing this is like offering the team mini pick-me-ups throughout the day. They act as distractions from the tough or heavy stuff, giving us the energy we need to persevere."

5.

Do you have any plans for continued education?

There are many continued education opportunities for cardiovascular technologists, including higher degrees or specialization in other areas such as invasive, noninvasive and vascular cardiology. If you are planning to further your education, it is essential that you express your desire to work in tandem with your classes. The concern of the interviewer is that you will be hired, trained, and then want to leave your job to go back to school full time.

Some organizations will offer tuition support or a reimbursement program for their employees who wish to continue their education. If they do provide this type of perk, you can indeed show interest but make sure that your continued education aspirations are related to the medical industry. If you are a cardiovascular technologist, you want to avoid saying that you would like to take courses in zoology.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"I believe that continued education is always a good idea. I like to expand my medical knowledge whenever possible. With that said, my job would always come first. I understand that you have a tuition reimbursement program for your employees seeking additional cardiovascular coursework. I would be interested in learning more about this down the road."

Heather's Answer #2

"Continued education is important to remain knowledgeable and relevant in your industry. I would be interested in earning my Advanced Certificate in Clinical Leadership; however, that would have to be in tandem with work."

6.

Think about a difficult boss, professor or coworker. What made him or her difficult? How did you successfully interact with this person?

Show the interviewer that you work well with most personalities even though you recognize there are some folks out there who are quite difficult to please.

Think about that one person at work who is seen as hard to please. Perhaps there is someone at work who tries to intimidate others. Talk to the interviewer about what made this person challenging and what their relationship was to you. Avoid speaking poorly of anyone and be sure to end your response on a positive note.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"I once worked at a small clinic where the supervisor was very demanding. The owner had great intentions; however, his people skills were a little rough. I could see that he meant well, and I recognized that he wanted to do a lot of good things. When we interacted, I always took his feedback with the understanding that he didn't mean things as harshly as he might say them."

Heather's Answer #2

"I had a rocky start with a manager earlier in my career because we had different expectations for the flow of the workday. Once we talked about it, we realized that our goals were very compatible, and we were able to work very successfully together for several years."

7.

What would you do if your patient went into cardiac arrest?

The interviewer would like to know that, as a medical professional, you know how to react in an emergency. Since you are interviewing for the role of cardiovascular technologist, a typical emergency may be a patient going into cardiac arrest patient. The interviewer is looking to see if you can briefly name the steps you would take if a patient were to show signs of cardiac arrest.

These steps may include:

- Calling for help from a doctor or nurse
- Locate a defibrillator
- Call 911 if you are not in a hospital setting already
- Check the patient's breathing and administer CPR if necessary

Rachelle's Answer #1

"If a patient went into cardiac arrest outside of a hospital setting, I would first check their pulse, check for breathing, and begin CPR if required. I would ask someone to call 911 and ask someone to locate an AED. I would administer the AED and continue CPR until medics arrived."

Rachelle's Answer #2

"Since I work in a hospital setting, the first thing I would do if a patient went into cardiac arrest would be to locate an AED and begin CPR until a physician came, or until we could get the patient into emerg. Time is of the essence in a cardiac arrest situation so it would be important that I act fast but smart."

8.

What do you know about our hospital?

Make sure you do your homework before your interview. Knowing about the hospital, and staff will show the interviewer that you are interested in their particular position and not just floating your resume. First, mention their goals and mission and how you appreciate their involvement within the community. Talk about the awards and accreditations the hospital has received. Reviewing the annual reports on their website is a great way to brush up on how the hospital is making a difference in the community.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"I know that your hospital has won recognition for being the top in cardiology, in the state. Your physicians are world-renowned, and you receive a great deal of support from local philanthropists, allowing you to purchase state-of-the-art equipment. I look forward to joining such an esteemed medical facility."

Heather's Answer #2

"Your facility has one of the top-rated cardiovascular units in the country, and I am interested in utilizing my experience with cardiac patients in a hospital engaging in the latest research and techniques."

9.

Where do you see your career one year from now?

This question is a short variation of the typical interview query, 'Where do you see yourself in five years?' Instead, the interviewer may ask more directly, 'Where do you see yourself in the next year?'.

Interviewing, hiring, and onboarding is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor for any company. The interviewer wants assurance that, if hired, you will see this as a longer-term fit. Discuss your career plans, goals, and how those fit with what this company is offering. Describe your passion for this opportunity, and what you like about the company for which you are applying.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"I am thrilled to be interviewing for your cardiovascular technologist opportunity. I believe with the talents and skill set I bring to your team, we will solve some very challenging health problems for your important patients. This opportunity is one I have been seeking for some time now, so I plan to stay for the long term should I be lucky enough to be hired."

Heather's Answer #2

"A year from now I'm hoping to be growing and becoming a stronger and more knowledgeable tech in your clinic. I look forward to learning and growing in a friendly organization that cares about its patients and medical staff. I have been progressing in the cardiovascular field for the last three years, and I know there is more to learn when it comes to terminology and reporting."

10.

Are you able to make decisions when under high levels of stress?

The interviewer would like to know if you can appropriately handle the stress related to this job. Discuss how you can keep the momentum going during the most stressful times while remaining kind and helpful to your patients and coworkers. If you can, provide an example of a time when you implemented a stress-management technique in your current role.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"I can make good decisions when under high levels of stress. I make a point not to allow stress to build up and get to a point where it would affect my work performance. In my current role, my supervisor calls on me specifically to handle difficult situations with nervous or upset patients. When you call my references, they will attest to this fact."

Heather's Answer #2

"Being a cardiovascular technologist can be stressful. The work is intense; sometimes there are long hours, complicated cases, and challenging patients. Luckily, I work with a supportive and knowledgeable team who are always there to lend me a hand in especially difficult situations. In return, I am there to support my co-workers during their most stressful times. To keep myself grounded, I ensure that I come to work well-rested. Also, I bring a book to read during my lunch breaks. Reading is an escape for me, and helps me to reset if needed."

11.

Give a specific example of a time when you used good judgement and logic in solving a problem.

Stable judgment calls are an integral part of being a successful medical professional. The interviewer would like to know that you can use logic and solve problems based on your sound judgment. If possible, answer this question with a specific situation or story. Show the interviewer that you have a great head on your shoulders.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"While monitoring a patients blood pressure and heart rate using electrocardiogram equipment during a diagnostic procedure, the EKG suggested a possible problem with the patient. I was able to notify the physician right away. Because of my prompt acknowledgment of the notification, we were able to help diagnose a serious issue in the patient."

Heather's Answer #2

"Last week we had a patient in for a routine and straightforward procedure. Afterward, the patient mentioned that they didn't feel well. I encouraged them to stay for a few extra minutes. I monitored the patient as best I could, between other patients, mentioning my concern to the physician. Fast-forward 30 minutes, we ended up rushing the patient to the ER for signs of possible blockage. My logic and judgment helped this patient to avoid a potentially fatal incident. "

12.

How would you calm a patient who is overcome by extreme stress?

As a medical professional, one of your best qualities is staying calm under pressure as well as keeping your patients calm. The interviewer would like to see how you handle challenging situations involving patients. Share a story with the interviewer about a time that you were able to calm the nerves of a patient. Be sure not to use names or details that would breach any confidentiality agreements.

Rachelle's Answer #1

"Procedures in our hospital can be very stressful for patients. Last week one of my patients was visibly shaken before her EKG. I took a few extra minutes to console her, explain all the details and answer all her questions. By taking a few extra minutes with this patient, I was able to put her mind at ease, and help her to understand better what to expect."

Heather's Answer #2

"Often, patient stress comes from fear of the unknown. I've found that the most important thing to do when dealing with an anxious patient is to listen, answer their questions patiently, and be a professional yet caring support tool. Most people feel better knowing that you are listening to their concerns and that, as a medical professional, you have the answers."

13.

How would you rate your performance in this interview so far?

The interviewer would like to know if you are satisfied with your interview performance. If your interview were a flop, you would know, and it's much better to address outright your performance than try to sweep it under the rug.

If you feel that your performance in the interview is going well: 'I believe that this interview has been quite informative and I am happy with my performance. Is there anything that I can clarify for you from this conversation?'

If you feel that your performance in the interview is not going well: "I am not sure if I have been able to portray myself 100% accurately in this interview; although, I am trying my best. If there is anything more I can clarify for you, I would be happy to do so."

Rachelle's Answer #1

"I am not sure if I have been able to portray myself 100% accurately in this interview; although, I am trying my best. If there is anything more I can clarify for you, I would be happy to do so."

Heather's Answer #2

"I would rate my performance to 90% of my ability. When you asked about my EKG experience, I feel that missed expressing some of my technical knowledge. If you have time, I would like to cover that question further."

14.

Are you available to work the night shift?

Don't consider the interview a bust if you can't tell the interviewer that you are ready to start on the night shift. The position you are interviewing for might be for the day shift, but the interviewer wants to see if covering for other people is a possibility. If you have flexibility in your schedule, let the interviewer know. If you are unable to work the night shift, be honest, and explain why. Could you pick up a night shift every once in a while?

Rachelle's Answer #1

"At this point, I wouldn't be able to work night shift on a regular basis, but if you would be able to give me a bit of notice, I could cover the night shift for a co-worker from time to time."

Heather's Answer #2

"My work schedule is quite flexible. If this role is for the night shift, I am happy to begin there and work my way into a daytime schedule."

15.

When entering a new job, describe how you build relationships with your new coworkers and supervisors.

The interviewer would like to know how you plan to start relationships with your new co-workers. Due to a wide variety of personalities, coworker connections can take time to form. How do you ensure that you have a strong line of communication with your co-workers and supervisors, right from the start?

Here are some ideas for getting started on the right foot:

- Be willing to accept feedback and help
- Offer to join a committee or volunteer assistance in some way
- Do not have an air of entitlement or act as though you know the ins and outs immediately
- Avoid all clinic gossip, at all cost
- Be thankful for the equipment that you have. Don't complain about your used computer or your slow dial out line!
- Be early on your first day (and every day after that!)
- Come dressed appropriately

Rachelle's Answer #1

"I understand that some relationships come quickly and others take time to nurture. When starting a new job all that I can do is be my true self and let my personality, integrity, and reliability speak for itself."

Heather's Answer #2

"I show up on time and dressed appropriately. I spend as much time as I can getting to know my new coworkers and telling them about myself and my family, and asking them about theirs. It is important to understand people on a bit of a personal level to know how to approach them."

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30 Cardiovascular Technologist Interview Questions
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Interview Questions

  1. When have you worked among a diverse group of people?
  2. Has anyone in particular been helpful to you in your growth as a cardiovascular professional?
  3. How did your college experience prepare you for a career in the cardiovascular field?
  4. How do you keep morale high when work gets stressful and you experience low moments?
  5. Do you have any plans for continued education?
  6. Think about a difficult boss, professor or coworker. What made him or her difficult? How did you successfully interact with this person?
  7. What would you do if your patient went into cardiac arrest?
  8. What do you know about our hospital?
  9. Where do you see your career one year from now?
  10. Are you able to make decisions when under high levels of stress?
  11. Give a specific example of a time when you used good judgement and logic in solving a problem.
  12. How would you calm a patient who is overcome by extreme stress?
  13. How would you rate your performance in this interview so far?
  14. Are you available to work the night shift?
  15. When entering a new job, describe how you build relationships with your new coworkers and supervisors.
  16. What are your salary expectations?
  17. Are you comfortable working close to cardiologists, distributing reports and interpreting diagnostic procedures?
  18. What would your co-workers say about you?
  19. Which parts of your current position brings you the most stress?
  20. What advice would you give to aspiring cardiovascular technologists?
  21. What are some career challenges you face, as a cardiovascular technologist?
  22. What qualities do you look for in a supervisor?
  23. We work in a multi-disciplinary environment. What is your experience in such an environment?
  24. Why did you choose a career in the cardiovascular field?
  25. What is your greatest weakness?
  26. Tell me about yourself.
  27. Explain to me what HIPAA is, and how it affects your job as a cardiovascular technologist.
  28. Describe a situation when you were able to strengthen a relationship through effective communication.
  29. What are your key skills, and how do they make you a successful cardiovascular technologist?
  30. Would you be able to lift and move a patient if needed?
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