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Cardiovascular Technologist Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated December 15th, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Question 1 of 30
Has anyone in particular been helpful to you in your growth as a cardiovascular professional?
View Answers
How to Answer
The interviewer wants to know whether you've formed strong professional relationships in your past work and educational environments. Discuss anyone who has inspired passion in you and mention how you appreciate learning from others. If you seek continual growth in the form of a mentor, or continued education opportunities, this is a great time to mention those initiatives.
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30 Cardiovascular Technologist Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Interview Questions
  1. Has anyone in particular been helpful to you in your growth as a cardiovascular professional?
  2. What do you know about our hospital?
  3. Think about a difficult boss, professor or coworker. What made him or her difficult? How did you successfully interact with this person?
  4. When entering a new job, describe how you build relationships with your new coworkers and supervisors.
  5. Where do you see your career one year from now?
  6. What are your salary expectations?
  7. Are you comfortable working close to cardiologists, distributing reports and interpreting diagnostic procedures?
  8. Do you have any plans for continued education?
  9. Are you available to work the night shift?
  10. When have you worked among a diverse group of people?
  11. What would your co-workers say about you?
  12. Which parts of your current position brings you the most stress?
  13. How would you rate your performance in this interview so far?
  14. What would you do if your patient went into cardiac arrest?
  15. How do you keep morale high when work gets stressful and you experience low moments?
  16. How would you calm a patient who is overcome by extreme stress?
  17. What advice would you give to aspiring cardiovascular technologists?
  18. What are some career challenges you face, as a cardiovascular technologist?
  19. What qualities do you look for in a supervisor?
  20. We work in a multi-disciplinary environment. What is your experience in such an environment?
  21. How did your college experience prepare you for a career in the cardiovascular field?
  22. Why did you choose a career in the cardiovascular field?
  23. What is your greatest weakness?
  24. Tell me about yourself.
  25. Explain to me what HIPAA is, and how it affects your job as a cardiovascular technologist.
  26. Give a specific example of a time when you used good judgement and logic in solving a problem.
  27. Describe a situation when you were able to strengthen a relationship through effective communication.
  28. What are your key skills, and how do they make you a successful cardiovascular technologist?
  29. Are you able to make decisions when under high levels of stress?
  30. Would you be able to lift and move a patient if needed?
Answer Examples
1.
Has anyone in particular been helpful to you in your growth as a cardiovascular professional?
The interviewer wants to know whether you've formed strong professional relationships in your past work and educational environments. Discuss anyone who has inspired passion in you and mention how you appreciate learning from others. If you seek continual growth in the form of a mentor, or continued education opportunities, this is a great time to mention those initiatives.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I have remained in close contact with my general sciences professor. She is the person who recommended I check out a career in cardiovascular, specifically. After my father suffered a heart attack, she knew the appreciation that grew in me, for the cardiovascular field. She sends me new resources and articles frequently, which are always helpful tools."
Heather's Answer #2
"My father has been helpful in my career growth, as he is a cardiologist. His passion for the patients he helps is what sparked my interest in the medical field. He has always encouraged me to work harder, to continue educating myself, and strive to be the best that I can be in my career."
2.
What do you know about our hospital?
Make sure you do your homework before your interview. Knowing about the hospital, and staff will show the interviewer that you are interested in their particular position and not just floating your resume. First, mention their goals and mission and how you appreciate their involvement within the community. Talk about the awards and accreditations the hospital has received. Reviewing the annual reports on their website is a great way to brush up on how the hospital is making a difference in the community.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I know that your hospital has won recognition for being the top in cardiology, in the state. Your physicians are world-renowned, and you receive a great deal of support from local philanthropists, allowing you to purchase state-of-the-art equipment. I look forward to joining such an esteemed medical facility."
Heather's Answer #2
"Your facility has one of the top-rated cardiovascular units in the country, and I am interested in utilizing my experience with cardiac patients in a hospital engaging in the latest research and techniques."
3.
Think about a difficult boss, professor or coworker. What made him or her difficult? How did you successfully interact with this person?
Show the interviewer that you work well with most personalities even though you recognize there are some folks out there who are quite difficult to please.

Think about that one person at work who is seen as hard to please. Perhaps there is someone at work who tries to intimidate others. Talk to the interviewer about what made this person challenging and what their relationship was to you. Avoid speaking poorly of anyone and be sure to end your response on a positive note.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I once worked at a small clinic where the supervisor was very demanding. The owner had great intentions; however, his people skills were a little rough. I could see that he meant well, and I recognized that he wanted to do a lot of good things. When we interacted, I always took his feedback with the understanding that he didn't mean things as harshly as he might say them."
Heather's Answer #2
"I had a rocky start with a manager earlier in my career because we had different expectations for the flow of the workday. Once we talked about it, we realized that our goals were very compatible, and we were able to work very successfully together for several years."
4.
When entering a new job, describe how you build relationships with your new coworkers and supervisors.
The interviewer would like to know how you plan to start relationships with your new co-workers. Due to a wide variety of personalities, coworker connections can take time to form. How do you ensure that you have a strong line of communication with your co-workers and supervisors, right from the start?

Here are some ideas for getting started on the right foot:

- Be willing to accept feedback and help
- Offer to join a committee or volunteer assistance in some way
- Do not have an air of entitlement or act as though you know the ins and outs immediately
- Avoid all clinic gossip, at all cost
- Be thankful for the equipment that you have. Don't complain about your used computer or your slow dial out line!
- Be early on your first day (and every day after that!)
- Come dressed appropriately

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I understand that some relationships come quickly and others take time to nurture. When starting a new job all that I can do is be my true self and let my personality, integrity, and reliability speak for itself."
Heather's Answer #2
"I show up on time and dressed appropriately. I spend as much time as I can getting to know my new coworkers and telling them about myself and my family, and asking them about theirs. It is important to understand people on a bit of a personal level to know how to approach them."
5.
Where do you see your career one year from now?
This question is a short variation of the typical interview query, 'Where do you see yourself in five years?' Instead, the interviewer may ask more directly, 'Where do you see yourself in the next year?'.

Interviewing, hiring, and onboarding is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor for any company. The interviewer wants assurance that, if hired, you will see this as a longer-term fit. Discuss your career plans, goals, and how those fit with what this company is offering. Describe your passion for this opportunity, and what you like about the company for which you are applying.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I am thrilled to be interviewing for your cardiovascular technologist opportunity. I believe with the talents and skill set I bring to your team, we will solve some very challenging health problems for your important patients. This opportunity is one I have been seeking for some time now, so I plan to stay for the long term should I be lucky enough to be hired."
Heather's Answer #2
"A year from now I'm hoping to be growing and becoming a stronger and more knowledgeable tech in your clinic. I look forward to learning and growing in a friendly organization that cares about its patients and medical staff. I have been progressing in the cardiovascular field for the last three years, and I know there is more to learn when it comes to terminology and reporting."
6.
What are your salary expectations?
In many states, it is now illegal for hiring authorities to ask about your current earnings. A question like this will give the interviewer a solid idea of what you are hoping to earn. When you change positions, you want to see an increase in wage. Most interviewees will typically aim for a 7-15% increase for each time they change jobs. This range offers room for negotiations with the new company. This percentage increase reflects economic inflation, unique skills you bring to the table from the last time you joined an organization, and an increase in responsibilities.

The best way to discuss your salary expectations is to use your current earnings as an example if you are comfortable doing so. If this makes you uncomfortable, do give as many indicators as you can. Be open, and honest. Transparency is the best choice when salary based questions arise.

If you are newer to your career, or the area, and are unsure of what a fair ask may be, there are many reliable salary calculators available online.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"In my current role, I am earning $40 per hour. I am seeking $43 to $45 per hour in my next opportunity. I am looking for a role that is the best fit for me and my experience, so I'll consider a few factors when I make a decision."
Heather's Answer #2
"After researching the area, the salary range looks to be between $55k and $60k per year. As a new cardiovascular technologist, I am looking for a blend of fair compensation, good health benefits, and a steady workplace."
7.
Are you comfortable working close to cardiologists, distributing reports and interpreting diagnostic procedures?
As a cardiovascular technologist you won't be working alone but with a team of medical professionals. The interviewer would like to know that you have spent time working with specialized physicians in the past and that you are comfortable collaborating with them when it comes to reporting and procedures. Give the interviewer a sample scenario of how you successfully worked as a team member, alongside cardiologists. Discuss how you contributed, and collaborated.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I have worked alongside Cardiologists in both a clinic and hospital setting for the past four years. I am well versed in the medical terminology required to hold my own when it comes to conversations with medical professionals. I have experience collecting and finalizing reports as well as interpreting physician instructions and diagnosis."
Heather's Answer #2
"Currently, I work alongside Cardiologists and nurses. I greatly value their feedback, mentorship, and instruction as I pave my career as a technologist. I have a great working relationship with the medical professionals in my office."
8.
Do you have any plans for continued education?
There are many continued education opportunities for cardiovascular technologists, including higher degrees or specialization in other areas such as invasive, noninvasive and vascular cardiology. If you are planning to further your education, it is essential that you express your desire to work in tandem with your classes. The concern of the interviewer is that you will be hired, trained, and then want to leave your job to go back to school full time.

Some organizations will offer tuition support or a reimbursement program for their employees who wish to continue their education. If they do provide this type of perk, you can indeed show interest but make sure that your continued education aspirations are related to the medical industry. If you are a cardiovascular technologist, you want to avoid saying that you would like to take courses in zoology.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I believe that continued education is always a good idea. I like to expand my medical knowledge whenever possible. With that said, my job would always come first. I understand that you have a tuition reimbursement program for your employees seeking additional cardiovascular coursework. I would be interested in learning more about this down the road."
Heather's Answer #2
"Continued education is important to remain knowledgeable and relevant in your industry. I would be interested in earning my Advanced Certificate in Clinical Leadership; however, that would have to be in tandem with work."
9.
Are you available to work the night shift?
Don't consider the interview a bust if you can't tell the interviewer that you are ready to start on the night shift. The position you are interviewing for might be for the day shift, but the interviewer wants to see if covering for other people is a possibility. If you have flexibility in your schedule, let the interviewer know. If you are unable to work the night shift, be honest, and explain why. Could you pick up a night shift every once in a while?

Rachelle's Answer #1
"At this point, I wouldn't be able to work night shift on a regular basis, but if you would be able to give me a bit of notice, I could cover the night shift for a co-worker from time to time."
Heather's Answer #2
"My work schedule is quite flexible. If this role is for the night shift, I am happy to begin there and work my way into a daytime schedule."
10.
When have you worked among a diverse group of people?
Diversity and inclusion is a hot topic, and now, the interviewer wants to see that you will be able to contribute to the workplace culture they have so carefully crafted. Discuss how you accustomed to working with a very large or diverse team of individuals. Perhaps everyone on your multi-disciplinary team comes from a differed educational background. Or, maybe you work with a significant range of patients on a daily basis, from all walks of life. Assure the interviewer that you can handle an environment that offers diversity.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"The clinic where I currently work has an extensive patient demographic. This diversity keeps me on my toes during rounds. Everyone's needs are different. I have to be sensitive to varying cultures, genders, and religions. It has stretched me as a medical professional, and I wouldn't have it any other way."
Heather's Answer #2
"I have worked with diverse groups of people most of my medical career, including my time in college. I am most comfortable, and happy, in an environment the embraces diversity, because it offers a great learning opportunity."
11.
What would your co-workers say about you?
The interviewer wants to know what positive statements your co-workers would apply to you if asked. Look back at previous conversations or even employee reviews. Perhaps you are often praised for being a good decision maker, someone who empowers their team or is an honest individual who goes out of their way to help. Briefly discuss what you believe your co-workers would say about you.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"My co-workers would say that I'm dependable and helpful. I always make a point to welcome and help new staff. I believe they would describe me as warm and inclusive with my patients and team, alike."
Heather's Answer #2
"I get along with nearly everyone on my team, and in my ten-year career. If asked, I believe my coworkers would say that I respect other people's knowledge, experience, and opinion, even if I don't agree. I think that is why I can work cohesively with most anyone."
12.
Which parts of your current position brings you the most stress?
Stress can often be a regular part of the day to day work experience, especially for a medical professional. Talk to the interviewer about which areas of your career as a cardiovascular tech are the most stressful. Ensure that your answer does not include a factor that would make you appear unfit for the position. For instance, dealing with patients or doctors should not be the most stressful part of the job.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"The part of my current position that brings me the most stress is when our patient schedule is running behind due to lack of hustle on my teams part. I like to be on time with our schedule to ensure that our patients are not left waiting, and receive timely care."
Heather's Answer #2
"Budget cuts are stressful for any medical professional working in the public sector; however, our district has been hit especially hard this year. I have to be very conscious of the materials used and have had to cut back on a few professional developments and educational opportunities for myself. It's unfortunate for the patients as we always want the best for them."
13.
How would you rate your performance in this interview so far?
The interviewer would like to know if you are satisfied with your interview performance. If your interview were a flop, you would know, and it's much better to address outright your performance than try to sweep it under the rug.

If you feel that your performance in the interview is going well: 'I believe that this interview has been quite informative and I am happy with my performance. Is there anything that I can clarify for you from this conversation?'

If you feel that your performance in the interview is not going well: "I am not sure if I have been able to portray myself 100% accurately in this interview; although, I am trying my best. If there is anything more I can clarify for you, I would be happy to do so."
Rachelle's Answer #1
"I am not sure if I have been able to portray myself 100% accurately in this interview; although, I am trying my best. If there is anything more I can clarify for you, I would be happy to do so."
Heather's Answer #2
"I would rate my performance to 90% of my ability. When you asked about my EKG experience, I feel that missed expressing some of my technical knowledge. If you have time, I would like to cover that question further."
14.
What would you do if your patient went into cardiac arrest?
The interviewer would like to know that, as a medical professional, you know how to react in an emergency. Since you are interviewing for the role of cardiovascular technologist, a typical emergency may be a patient going into cardiac arrest patient. The interviewer is looking to see if you can briefly name the steps you would take if a patient were to show signs of cardiac arrest.

These steps may include:

- Calling for help from a doctor or nurse
- Locate a defibrillator
- Call 911 if you are not in a hospital setting already
- Check the patient's breathing and administer CPR if necessary

Rachelle's Answer #1
"If a patient went into cardiac arrest outside of a hospital setting, I would first check their pulse, check for breathing, and begin CPR if required. I would ask someone to call 911 and ask someone to locate an AED. I would administer the AED and continue CPR until medics arrived."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Since I work in a hospital setting, the first thing I would do if a patient went into cardiac arrest would be to locate an AED and begin CPR until a physician came, or until we could get the patient into emerg. Time is of the essence in a cardiac arrest situation so it would be important that I act fast but smart."
15.
How do you keep morale high when work gets stressful and you experience low moments?
We all experience stress, so it's important not to answer this question stating you don't experience work stress at all. The interviewer wants to see that you can thrive and continue to motivate yourself through challenging days or situations. Discuss where you draw your strength and energy. If possible, mention a time when you came out on top of a profoundly difficult situation. Talk about what you learned through the situation.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"To keep morale high, even during the toughest moments, I never forget to laugh. A person can find the lightheartedness in any situation so, that is where I tend to go. I take my job seriously; however, I do not take myself too seriously. I remain open to learning opportunities and am unafraid to ask for help when I feel that I am drowning in work and responsibilities."
Heather's Answer #2
"One of my favorite past supervisors taught me to celebrate the small wins along the way. Doing this is like offering the team mini pick-me-ups throughout the day. They act as distractions from the tough or heavy stuff, giving us the energy we need to persevere."
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