Interviews Questions by Career
Interviews Questions by Company
Interviews Questions by Topic
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Benefits Manager Interview
Questions

25 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated August 17th, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Job Interviews     Careers     Business    
Question 1 of 25
Tell me about yourself.
View Answers
How to Answer
When an interviewer asks an open-ended question like this, it can be difficult to know where to begin...and end! This question haunts many individuals who may accidentally go a little too in-depth into their personal lives. It happens. Keep your reply light, and work relevant. Share how you became interested in this career path and what you enjoy about it. This question is an excellent opportunity to describe yourself by discussing the strengths and qualities that you bring.
1000s of Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Answer Examples
1.
Tell me about yourself.
When an interviewer asks an open-ended question like this, it can be difficult to know where to begin...and end! This question haunts many individuals who may accidentally go a little too in-depth into their personal lives. It happens. Keep your reply light, and work relevant. Share how you became interested in this career path and what you enjoy about it. This question is an excellent opportunity to describe yourself by discussing the strengths and qualities that you bring.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I am a competitive individual who is driven and likes to win. In addition to my successful career in human resources, I also spend time playing competitive sports. I give back by volunteering at the local animal shelter and working for a variety of annual fundraisers in our community."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I pursued a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration at UCLA, and upon graduation, I worked as a Benefits Intern for where I was responsible for filing, reviewing documents, and data entry. Since this internship, I have gained considerable benefits management experience working for [companyame ] where I managed [benefits management duties]. These are some of the reasons I believe I am a perfect fit for your position."
2.
What are your salary expectations?
The best way to discuss your salary expectations is to use your current earnings as an example. Be open, and honest. Transparency is the best choice when salary based questions arise.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Currently, I earn a base salary of $45,000 per year, and I would like to stay in the same range or slightly higher."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Seeing as I am newer to my career in benefits management, I am looking for an offer that reflects my education and experience. Most important to me is the idea of future growth and opportunity."
3.
Tell me about your ability to work under pressure and handle stressful situations.
Are you someone who can handle stress on the job? How do you manage the stressful times? Talk to the interviewer about your ability to control pressure in the workplace.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I always remain calm and look for ways to be more efficient. For instance, if there is an unexpected deadline, I will determine what can be done to ensure the deadline can be met. I will write down the steps to take to ensure successful completion and will delegate a few tasks if necessary. In brief, I am always ready to adjust my approach because stressful situations are bound to occur in a professional environment."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Stress is part of any demanding job, and I embrace it to the fullest. I take good care of myself and prioritize my workload to maintain a healthy balance in my stress levels."
4.
What do you see as the most difficult task in being a manager?
Being in a management role is always a significant challenge. Share with the interviewer what you feel is the most challenging part of being a manager, and why. Also, discuss what you are currently doing to make this task less difficult in the future.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"As a manager, the most difficult task for me is to delegate the work evenly. You will always have team members who are absolute rock-stars, then some who are a bit less enthusiastic or are lower producers. I have to remind myself to distribute the work and responsibilities evenly despite my natural inclination to give more work to the high performers. I am currently working with my underperforming team members to prepare them for a larger workload."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I would think the most difficult part of managing people will be being both their friend and earning their respect while being new on the team. To balance all of these roles, I will make sure to be approachable and genuinely interested in them as humans, but also make sure they know that it's a place of business and that meeting or exceeding expectations is the name of the game."
5.
How would you describe your written communication skills?
Being a bright communicator, in written form, is an essential skill to master. Have you taken any courses in communication and writing? Are you confident in your written communication skills? Talk to the interviewer about your written communication abilities and support your answer with a brief example or story.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I would describe my written communication skills as very strong and would rate myself as a 9/10. I have always had a penchant for writing and have taken university courses related to communication, writing, and business administration."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My written communication skills are powerful. I often utilize written communications as a follow up to verbal communications. They provide a great resource for associates to go back to, and reference, plus they might answer any questions that come up along the way."
6.
How do you handle a larger than average workload?
The interviewer wants to know that you can handle the workload required of you in this position and that you will not become overwhelmed if/when workloads unexpectedly increase. When workloads increase, stress levels do too. How do you react?

Rachelle's Answer #1
"When I have a large workload on my plate, I do not stress over the tasks that are in front of me. Rather, I make a simple plan of which tasks are a high priority and which tasks are a lower priority. The higher priority tasks, I complete first. Through this system, I can focus on my tasks individually, rather than stress out by the multitude of tasks ahead of me."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Here are some suggestions on how to handle a large workload:

- List your tasks and prioritize them
- Think of which tasks add to the company's bottom line, and start there (Closest to the money!)
- Exhale. Relax for a minute and collect yourself
- Organize your tasks by which ones you can complete independently and which ones you need help with
- Take sufficient breaks, so you do not exhaust yourself
- Communicate your struggles with your leadership or team"
7.
How do you handle communicating bad news to a fellow worker or subordinate?
One of the toughest parts of communication can be delivering bad news to people that you work with and care about. Whether it is delivering a less than positive work review or terminating someone - it doesn't come easy. Assure the interviewer that you can handle this type of task in a transparent, concise, and professional manner.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I certainly do not enjoy communicating bad news to a co-worker, but I do have experience in doing so. When this type of task is required of me, I make sure to practice empathy. Truth is always key, so I will be honest and clear when communicating the news. For instance, if I am to terminate someone's employment I will not sugar coat the reasons why. It's best they know so that they can learn from the experience."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I have found that communicating with respect and the intent to support the associate is the best approach. It is important to communicate what behaviors are off track and what resources are available to the associate to get back on track."
8.
Do you have any questions for me?
Before your interview, make sure you conduct research on the company and thoroughly review the job description for any clarification you may need on the position. Asking intelligent questions demonstrates to the interviewer your level of interest in their company, and the position. Typically, pay is not discussed during phone interviews, so avoid asking any compensation related questions in the phone interview.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Absolutely! What are you looking for in an ideal candidate? What type of pain points is your organization currently experiencing? What is the last successful practice your team implemented and how is it going?"
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Here are some sample questions:

- When would you like to have this position filled?
- How long has this role been vacant?
- Is this a replacement search or a newly created role?
- What is your favorite part of working here?
- What is the company's primary goal for this position in the next 12 months?
- Is there anything from my background and experience that I can clarify for you?
- What do you see as the most significant change in this industry over the past three years?
- Is there any reason why you would not move me to the next stage of interviews?"
9.
Do you feel that you are currently paid what you are worth?
Many employees will look for new work if they feel that they are underpaid and underappreciated. Talk to the interviewer about your current compensation and whether or not you think it is fair.

If you feel you are currently paid what you are worth: "I feel that my current employer pays me fairly; however, I would like to see an increase in pay with an increase in responsibilities."
Rachelle's Answer #1
"I feel that my current employer pays me fairly; however, I would like to see an increase in pay with an increase in responsibilities."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"If you do not feel you are currently paid what you are worth: "I know that I am underpaid compared to my industry colleagues. My company is small, and they do what they can, but this is part of why I am seeking a new position."
10.
How would you rate your performance in this interview so far?
This question is meant to put the pressure on, and to see if you indeed are happy with your performance in this interview. Answer this question honestly and confidently.

If you feel that your performance in the interview is going well: "I believe that this interview has been quite informative and I am happy with my performance. Is there anything that I can clarify for you from this conversation?"
Rachelle's Answer #1
"I believe that this interview has been quite informative and I am happy with my performance. Is there anything that I can clarify for you from this conversation?"
Rachelle's Answer #2
"If you feel that your performance in the interview is not going well: "I am not sure if I have been able to portray myself 100% accurately in this interview; although, I am trying my best. If there is anything more that I can clarify for you, I would be happy to do so."
11.
What excites you the most about this benefits management position?
Tell the interviewer the aspects of the job that excites you the most, and why. Link your answer with some of your qualifications to demonstrate you are suited for this role.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Being the main point of contact for all matters related to benefits management is very exciting because I love being responsible for the management and success of projects of all kinds - and have strong project management skills."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I am so excited for the opportunity to utilize my recent education in human resources. My time is university has prepared me for this role and will help me be a highly successful benefits manager."
12.
How often do you take work home with you?
The majority of people will work overtime hours or take work home with them on occasion. Talk to the interviewer about how frequently to take your work home.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I make sure to utilize my work hours very efficiently, so the only time that I take my work home is when there is an extremely stringent deadline. I would say that, overall, I take my work home maybe twice per month. It's all about being diligent with your time in the office!"
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I try not to take my work home with me. Everyone needs downtime. However, if something needs to get done, I will get it done, even from home."
13.
Do you always double check or proofread your work?
Double checking and proofreading are essential parts of a job well done, primarily when you are working with employee benefits. Assure the interviewer that you are diligent when it comes to submitting good, clean, work.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Spelling and grammatical errors are a pet peeve of mine. I will triple check my work if there is time! I feel that, within benefits management, it is critical to be submitting error-free work."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I try to, but in today's quick response age, I know that I send emails with mistypes. I concentrate very well on reports and presentations, and I do ask other people to review important letters or emails before sending them."
14.
Tell me about your relationship with your previous boss.
Remain positive, when answering this question, even if the experience wasn't. Avoid talking about any previous drama and do not speak poorly of your employer. Keep your answer short and respectful.

If you had a good relationship with your previous boss: "I had a very healthy relationship with my previous employer. She was easy to approach, and we would bounce ideas off of each other quite often. I would sum it up as a relationship lead by strong mutual respect."

If you did not have a good relationship with your previous boss: "I have had healthier relationships in the past with previous employers, but we did the best that we could. Our communication styles were very different which made it challenging at times."
Rachelle's Answer #1
"I had a very healthy relationship with my previous employer. She was easy to approach, and we would bounce ideas off of each other quite often. I would sum it up as a relationship lead by strong mutual respect."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My previous boss and I got along well. We had very different interests, so we did not spend a lot of time chatting, but our work interests were aligned, and we respected each other."
15.
When have you worked among a diverse group of people?
Are you accustomed to working with a very large or diverse team of individuals? Assure the interviewer that you can handle an environment that offers diversity.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I have worked with diverse groups of people most of my career, including my time in University. I am most comfortable, and happy, in this type of environment because it offers a great learning opportunity."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"In my current role, I work alongside cross-functional teams regularly. There is a lot of diversity present, and I appreciate that immensely."
More Interview Q&As
Explore expert tips and resources to be more confident in your next interview.
Behavioral
Common
Phone
Tough
Leadership
All Interview Topics
All Career Q&As
Suggested Career
Interview Q&As
Continue practicing by visiting these similar question sets
Actuary
Compensation Manager
Human Resources Manager
Management Analyst
Manager
25 Benefits Manager Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Interview Questions
  1. Tell me about yourself.
  2. What are your salary expectations?
  3. Tell me about your ability to work under pressure and handle stressful situations.
  4. What do you see as the most difficult task in being a manager?
  5. How would you describe your written communication skills?
  6. How do you handle a larger than average workload?
  7. How do you handle communicating bad news to a fellow worker or subordinate?
  8. Do you have any questions for me?
  9. Do you feel that you are currently paid what you are worth?
  10. How would you rate your performance in this interview so far?
  11. What excites you the most about this benefits management position?
  12. How often do you take work home with you?
  13. Do you always double check or proofread your work?
  14. Tell me about your relationship with your previous boss.
  15. When have you worked among a diverse group of people?
  16. What do you know about our company culture?
  17. Why did you decide to pursue a career in benefits management?
  18. What are your weaknesses?
  19. What do you feel is the most important skill a benefits manager should possess?
  20. When you suffer a setback, how does that emotionally affect you and your work?
  21. Where do you see yourself five years from now?
  22. How do you like to be recognized for your accomplishments?
  23. If you could start your career over again, what direction would you take?
  24. Why are you considering leaving your current employer?
  25. Why should we hire you?
Disclaimer
Our interview questions and answers are created by experienced recruiters and interviewers. These questions and answers do not represent any organization, school, or company on our site. Interview questions and answer examples and any other content may be used else where on the site. We do not claim our questions will be asked in any interview you may have. Our goal is to create interview questions and answers that will best prepare you for your interview, and that means we do not want you to memorize our answers. You must create your own answers, and be prepared for any interview question in any interview.
Learn more about what we believe >
Read our Terms of Use for more information >