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ADP Mock Interview

To help you prepare for an ADP job interview, here are 50 interview questions and answer examples.

ADP was updated by on November 13th, 2022. Learn more here.

Question 1 of 50

Tell me about yourself. What makes you unique?

"Well, I am a people person at heart, which is why I pursued my career in human resources. I feel passionate that a person should love their job, their career, and their work. So many of our hours spent at work, and we should make that time count. I did the best I could with my current employer, but there are certain approaches to how my current company conducts business that isn't in line with my values, and I decided to start pursuing opportunities elsewhere in an environment that feels like more of a good fit for me. I am not looking for any job, anywhere, but for a company where I would feel proud to work, and ADP feels like the right fit for me. Thank you for meeting with me today."

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50 ADP Interview Questions & Answers

Below is a list of our ADP interview questions. Click on any interview question to view our answer advice and answer examples. You may view 10 answer examples before our paywall loads. Afterwards, you'll be asked to upgrade to view the rest of our answers.

Every interview is unique, not only because of the personality and goals of the person interviewing you, but more so due to the nature of the company, their brand identity, and their culture. So, entering into an ADP interview, you should not only be prepared to present yourself professionally, but you should be ready to bring your personality to the table as well. ADP celebrates diversity, equality, and inclusion, like so many other do industries today. However, diversity can mean many things. Every person is unique, and the more unique of a person you are, the more you have to contribute to their diverse workforce. So be ready to showcase your personality and bring your whole self to the interview.

It also holds value to look at your interview from your interviewer’s perspective. You are looking for gainful employment, but you shouldn’t just assume they are desperate to hire anyone who seems qualified to do the work. More importantly, they are looking for someone who they can trust to represent their company according to their values. Any manager or leader in a company has taken ownership of their part in the company’s success. They’ve participated in building something, and now they are looking to continue to build upon their ideal teams. This is important to consider when preparing for an interview.

So the only way to identify the answers to the questions they are asking, and why they are asking them, is to research ADP and find out what they are all about. You’ll find they are much more than a technology company that caters to HR and Payroll software. Self actualize yourself in this role by starting your onboarding process before your interview. Learn everything you can about ADP. This will help you focus your answers on what matters, and help you set clear goals in what you want to communicate.

  • Accomplishment

    1. Tell me about yourself. What makes you unique?

  • Behavioral

    2. What is your greatest strength?

  • Behavioral

    3. At ADP we like to recognize our most dedicated employees. How do you like to be recognized for your accomplishments?

  • Behavioral

    4. If ADP hired you today, what would you accomplish first?

  • Behavioral

    5. Tell me about your greatest work-related accomplishment.

  • Behavioral

    6. Tell me about a difficult workplace goal you set. What steps did you take to achieve that goal?

  • Behavioral

    7. How do you prioritize multiple projects when they all seem equally important?

  • Behavioral

    8. How have your previous employers earned your loyalty?

  • Behavioral

    9. What is your greatest weakness?

  • Behavioral

    10. ADP is one of most well-known payroll services companies in the world. Why should we hire you over another candidate?

  • Behavioral

    11. Tell me one good thing and one bad thing your previous boss might say about you.

  • Behavioral

    12. What skills would you like to improve upon?

  • Behavioral

    13. What are the first three things you do when joining a new team?

  • Behavioral

    14. Tell me about a time when you used your own judgement, and the result was not successful.

  • Behavioral

    15. Tell me about a time you had to learn a new task. How did you go about learning it?

  • Behavioral

    16. Tell me about a significant contribution you made in your current position.

  • Behavioral

    17. If hired, what are the top skills you will bring to ADP?

  • Behavioral

    18. Tell me about an ethical dilemma you faced in the workplace and how you handled it.

  • Behavioral

    19. Culture fit is really important to us at ADP. How would you describe your workplace personality?

  • Behavioral

    20. ADP seeks to hire natural leaders. Tell me about a time when you took initiative in the workplace.

  • Behavioral

    21. One of ADP's core values is "excellence in service." How do you demonstrate excellence in service in the workplace?

  • Customer Service

    22. What would you do if a client wanted to terminate their contract?

  • Customer Service

    23. How many years of customer experience do you have?

  • Customer Service

    24. At ADP, we take great pride in our customer service reputation. How would you deal with a customer dispute?

  • Customer Service

    25. How would you respond if a client or customer asked you a question you didn't know the answer to?

  • Diligence

    26. Tell me about your attendance record.

  • Discovery

    27. How would working for ADP aid in your five-year plan?

  • Discovery

    28. What are you hoping to gain from this role at ADP that you did not receive in your previous job?

  • Discovery

    29. Do you see yourself with ADP in the next 3-5 years?

  • Discovery

    30. How would you feel about working beyond your scheduled hours in the evenings or on the weekends?

  • Discovery

    31. Are you actively interviewing with other companies?

  • Discovery

    32. Would you be able to travel from time to time?

  • Discovery

    33. What do you know about the history of ADP?

  • Discovery

    34. What would you do if you had to relocate?

  • Discovery

    35. What qualities are you seeking in a manager at ADP?

  • Discovery

    36. What is your desired salary?

  • Discovery

    37. Why do you want a career with ADP?

  • Discovery

    38. What do diversity, equity, and inclusion mean to you personally?

  • EQ

    39. How important is integrity to you?

  • Experience

    40. ADP hires a diverse workforce. What experience do you have working with a diverse group of people?

  • Experience

    41. What is your experience level with computerized payroll systems?

  • Experience

    42. What types of KPIs are you measured against in your current role?

  • Experience

    43. ADP likes to hire over-achievers. Tell me about a time you achieved over and above your given quota or expectations.

  • Problem Solving

    44. Would you consider yourself a risk taker?

  • Technical

    45. What can you tell me about garnishments?

  • Technical

    46. Do you know what ADP stands for?

  • Technical

    47. Besides payroll, what other services do we offer at ADP?

  • Technical

    48. How would a small business benefit from using ADP?

  • Technical

    49. How can ADP services benefit multinational businesses?

  • Technical

    50. Tell me about your experience and how it is relevant to this role with ADP.

  • Questions To Ask In An ADP Interview

    It is always important, and expected, to come prepared with questions for your interview. Hence the old adage, ‘You are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you.’ Some standard questions are expected, such as asking the interviewer what they love about working there. Other questions that you write down may likely be answered at some point elsewhere in the interview. When this is the case, the last thing you want to happen is to run out of questions to ask before you even got around to asking them. Yet another reason to prepare in advance.

    The more you research their company, the more questions you’ll be able to come up with. Also, don’t limit yourself. Let them know you are genuinely interested in working for them specifically. Take advantage of this opportunity to showcase your research by asking unique questions that would be fun for your interviewer to answer, which are company culture-centric.

    Here are a few examples to guide you in formulating the right kinds of questions to ask in your ADP interview:

    1. Under the description of ADP’s employment experience, it says there are opportunities for advancement, training and development. I am very career focussed and have an ambitious career plan. Can you tell me what the average advancement opportunities and career progression would look like for this position, and how actively you are promoting from within?

    2. This opportunity detailed there was no experience necessary. In the employee testimonial videos included below the job description, ADP employees really raved about the training program being second to none. I’m eager to learn more about it. Would you mind sharing a little of the training process with me, and what makes it so unique?

    3. Can you tell me more about your opportunities for global mobility?

    4. Would you say the most clients ADP serves are small or midsize businesses, or enterprise businesses? Or would you say it is even across the board?

    5. The company has obviously come a long way in the last 70 years. I’m curious, in the beginning In 1949, when ADP was known as Automatic Payrolls, what products or services did they offer? I read that they didn’t start using punched card machines or check printing machines until 1961, so I’m curious what kind of system was used before then.

    ADP's Company Culture

    ADP is a company that specializes in payroll software, which is a human resources product. The better a company’s Human Resources department can perform, the better the employee experience will be. This is highlighted in one of ADP’s Culture Statements, which states that they are always designing for people, and that they start with their own.

    Spending some time watching the employee testimonial videos they have on their website, the sincerity of how wholeheartedly their employees stand behind ADP’s product and services, is remarkable. In fact, ADP even advertises on their careers’ webpage that they strive to be a company that their employees are proud of. “We welcome big thinking people who can amplify wisdom, accelerate progress, and embrace change. People who want, and expect, more out of life. Like a job and a company they can be proud of.” This is the mark of a successful brand. Where a company has a successful product, backed with integrity, which their employees stand behind with pride. In return, they take excellent care of their employees, which motivates them to deliver an above and beyond customer service experience. Great products and great services. As ADP puts it, “Good karma. Our work makes other companies better at what they do. Which in turn makes us super successful, with the ability to create an excellent workplace of our own. Ta da!”

    They describe their culture as down-to-earth, “where you can bring your whole self to work every day.” They celebrate their employees for their individuality, and what makes each of them unique, from their hobbies to their interests to their cultural background and their diversity. Their employees genuinely seem to love where they work as a result, which motivates them, in turn, to put their all in. “This is what ADP looks like. Isn’t this what life is all about? Finding something meaningful that you love doing in a place you enjoy doing it? ADP can give you that opportunity. We believe in who you are, what you know and where you hope to go with your career. Our strengths-based leadership approach will value what you do best and let you shine.”

    So, they want to hire people who embrace what makes them unique and sets them apart from other companies. They are looking for candidates who will bring their whole selves to the interview. So showcase how you’ll fit into their teams of “big-thinking people.” You’ll want to exhibit emotional intelligence, and that you can “amplify wisdom, accelerate progress, and embrace change.” You’ll want to celebrate diversity and inclusion, and an eagerness to learn from and collaborate with perspectives outside of your own. “Sharing what we have in common. Champions for change. A passion for our work. And the inspiration we get from one another. That’s what makes working here special.”

    On their careers page, they invite you to “Say hello and stay connected.” This suggests that you should have excellent relationship building and team-building skills, and be a team player. They place a lot of emphasis on celebrating their people, so this should play into your motivation for pursuing the role.

    About the Author

    When I started my career in business management, branding, and marketing, I mistakenly assumed hard work and integrity alone would get me noticed. Back then, I assumed the harder I worked, the faster I’d rise through the ranks. Yet, even in a meritocracy, this is rarely the case.

    The goals of my peers competed with mine, and too often, they were better at getting noticed for their accomplishments. And, some of them were all too happy to watch me working harder, as they worked smarter, rising through the ranks faster than me. At one point, a boss of mine labeled me a stealth worker. They said they had no idea I was the one performing all that great work. If only I’d drawn more attention to what I was doing, maybe I would have gotten rewarded for it. So I learned most of my leadership skills the hard way, and the journey was long.

    As a leader, my favorite part of the job came to be coaching others. I took pride in sharing the secrets to my eventual success, and offering my outside-of-the-box view of the role. Where other leaders were only in it for themselves, I was genuinely in it for the company and the team. So I taught those I mentored not only what they needed to do, and how to do the job right, but why each step was important. I spelled out how everything fit into the big picture and shared every trick of the trade that no one shared with me. Every single individual I mentored advanced far ahead of their peers, surpassing those who were only in it for themselves.

    Another favorite part of the job was recruiting and building the perfect teams. For me, conducting an interview was an art form. I later volunteered my services at career fairs and trade schools, offering advice, from crafting the perfect CV and resume, to delivering a perfect interview, to negotiating a decent raise. Now I am a full-time writer, and left my management career behind me. Yet, I still love coaching others to succeed, and I love writing for mockquestions.com for this very reason.

    Here’s what I said to a friend of mine whom I mentored a long time ago: “Every single thing you do, at every stage, can alter the perception others have of your professional worth. My goal is to make you look like an asset worth fighting for.”

    Learn more about Kevin Downey