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Netflix

30 Interview Questions & Answers

1.
We want to hire people at Netflix who have the desire to lead others. How many people did you supervise at your last position?
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Netflix likes to promote leaders who display strength in the areas of good judgment, communication, curiosity, courage, passion, selflessness, innovation, inclusion, integrity, and impactful work.

Discuss with the interviewer your level of responsibility in your current position. If you have managed larger teams than you currently do, you can also discuss that particular role from your work history.

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1.
We want to hire people at Netflix who have the desire to lead others. How many people did you supervise at your last position?
Netflix likes to promote leaders who display strength in the areas of good judgment, communication, curiosity, courage, passion, selflessness, innovation, inclusion, integrity, and impactful work.

Discuss with the interviewer your level of responsibility in your current position. If you have managed larger teams than you currently do, you can also discuss that particular role from your work history.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Currently, I am supervising 12 employees with an overall portfolio responsibility of $24MM. In my role, before this one, I managed 23 employees but with a smaller portfolio of $6MM. I can handle a large range of employees because I focus on making an impact as a team, and communicating clearly. I also lead by making excellent judgment calls that benefit the team."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Although I did not officially supervise anyone in my most recent position, I always had my eye out for opportunities to lead or mentor the more junior staff. I base my work on integrity, and inclusion which I know are traits that Netflix highly values."
Anonymous Answer
"My last two projects had a team size of 24, both that I managed remotely. I wouldn't call it "supervising," as I only bring people on my team where I want to set them up for success and get out of their way to perform. Each week we had a very useful sprint planning check-in and goal setting. I was to ensure all goals met, nothing falls between the cracks, and that nobody has any roadblocks, and is enjoying the process. During the week we had speedy check-ins."
Rachelle's Answer
Your style of leadership could work very well for Netflix. You show confidence in your hiring choices, which is a wonderful thing!
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2.
Do you know anyone who works for us?
Did you know, according to Forbes, that people with a friend at work are 7x more likely to engage in their work fully? The interviewer would like to see if a friend referred you to this position, a former co-worker, or an industry acquaintance. This question is another way of the interviewer asking where you heard about the role, and if you have any connections from within. You can keep your answer brief and to the point.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I do not personally know anyone who works for Netflix; however, I am connected with a couple of your employees on LinkedIn due to common group interests. I look forward to getting to know your team!"
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My former manager now works for Netflix, although in a different department. His name is James Smith. He's a great guy! I would be happy to fill out any referral paperwork if you wish."
3.
What was one question you didn't want me to ask today?
This question can stand in for the common 'What is your greatest weakness' question. The interviewer is expecting you to be unprepared because it's an uncommon way of asking a question. You may be less scripted than other points in your interview, and the interviewer wants to see how you deal with that.

Two scenarios commonly play out: either a candidate blurts out a weakness, or they pause and respond with something thoughtful. This question gives the interviewer information about you but also a good sense of if you can think on your feet and answer a tough question. Use this as an opportunity to show how weakness can be a strength, or explain something they have not yet asked, but may be an objection to you getting the job. It is then up to you to overcome the opposition.

Remember: it is okay to pause and be thoughtful about your response rather than blurting something out or seeming too rehearsed. Be prepared, but be sincere in your replies.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I suppose I did not want you to dig into why I applied three years ago and rescinded my application. I feel embarrassed about it because I thought I was ready to leave my current organization and decided that, to be the superstar I want to be at Netflix, I needed a bit more time and experience. I know that in these past three years I have learned everything I could need to know to shine here and I can't wait to put those last three years of learning and growth into action."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I didn't want to discuss why it took five years to graduate college. I was working full time while attending college and double majoring. Initially, I was taking the full course load and working full time, then eventually I also switched my major, which added a semester. At that time, I hunkered down and upped the course load while working full time. So, while it may have taken me longer, I learned a lot both in and outside of the classroom, including time management and upping productivity. I know these are important skills that I bring with me to any position, and look forward to leveraging them here at Netflix."
Anonymous Answer
"Philosophically, questions are what I thrive on, and finding the ones I don't want to face are in fact the ones I know I grow the most from. So I embrace the hardest or ugliest questions. However, I'd say it would likely be around hierarchy and office politics. When ideas, suggestions, or orders come into the space and they come from a place of fear or ego, I struggle to play along for the theater of it."
Rachelle's Answer
Good! This is a thoughtful and genuine response, showing the interviewer a lot about your personality and preferences when it comes to your workplace environment.
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4.
How would you rate your performance in this interview so far?
The interviewer would like to know if you are satisfied with your interview performance. If your interview were a flop, you would know, and it's much better to address outright your performance than try to sweep it under the rug.

If you feel that your performance in the interview is going well: 'I believe that this interview has been quite informative and I am happy with my performance. Is there anything that I can clarify for you from this conversation?'

If you feel that your performance in the interview is not going well: "I am not sure if I have been able to portray myself 100% accurately in this interview; although, I am trying my best. If there is anything more I can clarify for you, I would be happy to do so."
Rachelle's Answer #1
"I am not sure if I have been able to portray myself 100% accurately in this interview; although, I am trying my best. If there is anything more I can clarify for you, I would be happy to do so."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I would rate my performance as an 8/10. I am happy how I answered most of the questions; however, I feel that I stumbled a bit when you asked me about my expertise with Java and Python. Could I further clarify for you?"
5.
How was your performance measured, in your most recent role?
The interviewer would like to understand better the key performance indicators you needed to meet in a more recent role, and how precisely those KPI's were measured. A good interviewer will recognize that the top candidates always understand how their performance is measured, and where they landed in regards to their performance against others in a similar role.

It is a red flag to an interviewer if the interviewee responds with 'I don't know,' or worse yet - 'My company didn't measure my performance in any way.' Every company pays attention to employee performance metrics; it's just that some ways are more evident than others.

Some ways that your employer might measure your performance:

- The rate of absence, late days, and sick days
- Setting specific objectives for you, related to a task
- Amount of defective work submitted, or amount of work returned
- Human Capital ROI
- Error counting
- Timed tasks
- Employee retention rates (for managers)
- Revenue Per Employee or Profit per FTE (Full Time Equivalent)
- The willingness of clients to recommend you or your work
- Feedback provided by coworkers and management
- Number of sales
- Scheduling errors
- Safety days
- First- call resolution or call quality and handling (primarily for call-center environments)
- Quality of contacts generated

Rachelle's Answer #1
"In my previous role as a content marketer for a cable company, I was measured by a range of social media analytics, client feedback, overall client satisfaction, as well as project churn rate. My KPI's were always sitting about 20% above expectations."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"We had online customer surveys in my most recent role. Another KPI was the number of services upsold per transaction. I was consistently in the top 10 out of 100 for our region."
Anonymous Answer
"First and foremost, nobody got kidnapped, injured, or killed. We took a significant risk bringing 200 people from 40 countries to the coast of Kenya and into the Indian Ocean with Somali Pirates. Following that was participant experience, the quantity of content generated and shared, following year tickets purchased, that we were profitable, and on-going engagement within the community."
Rachelle's Answer
This sounds intense, and very interesting! Be prepared for followup questions from the interviewer, depending on how engaged they are. Good response.
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