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Interior Designer Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated July 5th, 2020 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Question 1 of 30
What kind of discovery questions do you ask your clients before beginning a new project?
View Answer
How to Answer
Part of your success as an Interior Designer is to build the right foundation at the start of each project. The discovery process is critical to the success of the project, and a great discovery session can help to ensure that your client is happy with the result. The interviewer wants to picture you conversing with a new client. Discuss the types of questions that you ask, but avoid responding with a bulleted list. Take the time to walk the interviewer through your process.
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30 Interior Designer Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Interview Questions
  1. What kind of discovery questions do you ask your clients before beginning a new project?
  2. Tell me about a design project that did not turn out as expected. What were the contributing factors, and how did you ensure a positive result?
  3. When it comes to project collaboration versus working independently, what is your preference, and why?
  4. Tell me about your ideal design project. If you could conceptualize anything from start to finish, what would it be?
  5. Do you prefer functionality or appeal? Support your preference.
  6. Describe your design style. What factors or influences led you to your signature style?
  7. What type of projects would you like to be involved in, to expand your interior design portfolio?
  8. What do you know about sustainable design?
  9. How do you handle stressful situations, such as collaborating with uncooperative architects or tradespeople?
  10. Looking at your design portfolio, which project makes you most proud, and why?
  11. What resources or publications do you lean on to keep current with design trends?
  12. What do you love most about the interior design profession?
  13. What tools or framework do you use to ensure that your project quotes are as accurate as possible?
  14. How do you gain buy-in from your client when presenting a design concept?
  15. If you were working on a design project and disagreed with someone on the team, how would you voice your opinion?
  16. Describe a successful team-based design project. What was your role within the team, and how did you contribute to the projects' success?
  17. Talk about a unique project in your portfolio. What was the vision and inspiration?
  18. Do you work well under pressure? Give me an example of a time when you succeeded under immense pressure.
  19. How well do you collaborate with others when it comes to design, style, and project vision?
  20. When did you realize you wanted to be an Interior Designer? What initially sparked your passion for style and design?
  21. Tell me about a time when a client was upset with a design choice you made. How did you handle the situation?
  22. Tell me about a time when your design idea clashed with the vision of your client or a team member.
  23. Have you ever encountered a situation where your client did not like your design? How did you handle the situation?
  24. Are there any interior design styles you tend to stay away from or dislike?
  25. Tell me about your career goals. How can our design firm help you to reach these goals?
  26. Tell me about a time when you had to work with a difficult client. How did you approach communicating with this client?
  27. How will you make a positive contribution to our design firm?
  28. How do you market yourself as an Interior Designer? What is your 'elevator pitch' with potential clients?
  29. Have you ever exceeded the budget for a design project? If so, what did you do to fix the situation? What are your steps for monitoring a project budget?
  30. What tech and tools do you use to support your design process?
Answer Examples
1.
What kind of discovery questions do you ask your clients before beginning a new project?
Part of your success as an Interior Designer is to build the right foundation at the start of each project. The discovery process is critical to the success of the project, and a great discovery session can help to ensure that your client is happy with the result. The interviewer wants to picture you conversing with a new client. Discuss the types of questions that you ask, but avoid responding with a bulleted list. Take the time to walk the interviewer through your process.

Rachelle's Answer
"I like to ask questions such as, 'Tell me about your ideal space.' I bring an open-ended approach and reserve closed-ended questions when I require a targeted response for topics such as the budget and timeline. When asking discovery questions, I get to know my client and their habits in the space that we are re-designing. For instance, if we are in their home, I will say, 'Walk me through your living pattern, from morning to evening.' Or, I will say, 'Can you show me your morning routine?' I want to see how they move about their house so that when their new design is in place, everything flows and remains convenient. I will say, 'Tell me how you want to feel in this space,' which is a terrific way to gain an idea of the feelings that I should elicit in my design. Open-ended dialogue is critical so that I know the client will get what they want out of the design project in both the look and overall vibe."
Anonymous Answer
"Well, I’m really excited by this opportunity to work for this design firm because, in five years, I’d like to be seen as someone with deep expertise in the design field, and I know that’s something that I’ll have an opportunity to do here. I’m also really excited to learn from the experts in interior design and potentially even take the lead on some projects. I’ve been lucky enough to work with a company that has allowed me to grow in my skillsets for communications, and so I'm really excited to take those skills that I have learned and use it for this position."
Rachelle's Answer
You have a great vision for yourself and your career! Be aware of the number of times you use 'really excited' and try to work on expanding your descriptive words so that your interview responses do not come across as repetitive. I have provided an example below.
"In five years, I want to be seen as a design professional with deep expertise in (choose one or two specific design topics). I am eager to learn from the experts at (company name), eventually taking the lead on interior design projects."
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Anonymous Answer
"Well, I’m really excited by this opportunity to work for this design firm because, in five years, I’d like to be seen as someone with deep expertise in the design field, and I know that’s something that I’ll have an opportunity to do here. I’m also really excited to learn from the experts in interior design and potentially even take the lead on some projects. I’ve been lucky enough to work with a company that has allowed me to grow in my skillsets for communications, and so I'm really excited to take those skills that I have learned and use it for this position."
Rachelle's Answer
You have a great vision for yourself and your career! Be aware of the number of times you use 'really excited' and try to work on expanding your descriptive words so that your interview responses do not come across as repetitive. I have provided an example below.
"In five years, I want to be seen as a design professional with deep expertise in (choose one or two specific design topics). I am eager to learn from the experts at (company name), eventually taking the lead on interior design projects."
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
2.
Tell me about a design project that did not turn out as expected. What were the contributing factors, and how did you ensure a positive result?
The interviewer wants you to tell a story of a time when you recognized that a project was off track, and you were able to recover the situation.

For 'Tell me about...' interview questions, try delivering a response by using the STAR interview technique. STAR is an acronym for Situation, Task, Action, Result. The STAR approach will help you to form an engaging story that is easy for the interviewer to follow.

Discuss some detail of the project and situation. Include what you believe contributed to the unexpected project result. Mention the action steps that you took, and then the overall positive impact. Discuss how you made efforts to align communication and expectations. Be sure also to highlight what you learned from the situation.

Rachelle's Answer
"(Situation & Task) Last year, I worked on a design project for a clothing shop in a heritage building downtown. The owner had some pretty wild ideas that I felt my design team could execute. These ideas included massive iron displays suspended from the ceiling and a rotating display case built into the floor. Partway into the project, issues around the store's structure arose, and we were not able to bring this clients' vision entirely to life while maintaining safety and keeping the structural integrity of the building. The client did not understand the recommendations made by our architect, and communication broke down quickly. (Action) I know that there is an emotional element to design, especially when working with entrepreneurs who live and breathe their businesses. I called a meeting between myself, the client, and our senior architect. We rendered some new drawings and presented three alternate options for the client. (Result) Ultimately, the client chose one of the alternate options but somewhat begrudgingly. I knew that the client was more disappointed than angry because everything that we presented made complete sense, and the issues were not the fault of anyone - they were simply due to the buildings' limitations. During this project, I learned a lot about conflict resolution, problem-solving, and the importance of outlining explicit expectations and potential roadblock from the beginning."
3.
When it comes to project collaboration versus working independently, what is your preference, and why?
Before your interview, carefully review the job description and company website to gain an understanding of the role. This research will allow you to see if the position requires working individually or primarily in a team-based environment.

When the interviewer asks you a collaboration-related question, share that you are open to working in teams or independently. If you have a strong preference for one environment over the other, be sure to mention your preference while expressing that you will happily work with others.

Rachelle's Answer
"My answer depends on the project. I have passion projects that I enjoy, and I like to do these on my own or with an assistant who understands my style and approach. Those passion projects include working with designers and small business owners on displays and storefronts. When I work on with a small business owner, it is a more personal approach, and I like the one-on-one intimacy. When working on larger scale projects such as commercial designs or hotel remodels, I much prefer to work with other talented designers. I learn so much from the expertise of others, and it also disperses the pressure when it comes to decision making or meeting tight deadlines. For me, the best part of being an Interior Designer is is that no day looks the same, and there are so many ways that I can use my gifts and abilities while also growing and learning from others."
Anonymous Answer
"I am very open to both and believe both have benefits. Working in teams increases collaboration and allows for brainstorming. I created some of my favorite designs by bouncing my ideas off with my coworkers, and it also helped me to really visualize what the end design would be. Often in the design field, you're faced with issues that need creative problem-solving. Working with someone more experienced or that has seen the same issue in the past, it gives the opportunity for learning from one another."
Rachelle's Answer
Excellent! Again, I recommend working on brevity. Try also adding in that you are capable of independent work. I have provided an example below.
"Independent and group work each have their benefits. Working in teams increases collaboration and allows for brainstorming. I created some of my favorite designs by bouncing ideas off my coworkers. This collaboration helped me to visualize what the end design would be. Often in the design field, I am faced with issues that need creative problem-solving. Working with someone more experienced allows me to learn and grow. With that said, I am capable of independent work and self-led learning."
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4.
Tell me about your ideal design project. If you could conceptualize anything from start to finish, what would it be?
As an Interior Designer, you probably daydream and conceptualize projects that you would take on if there were no restrictions. Without a budget or anyone saying no to your ideas, what would you create? Take your time to walk the interviewer through your ideal design project. Share your inspiration and bring it to life for the interviewer.

Rachelle's Answer
"I love to travel and embrace other cultures. I have traveled all over the world and have lived in numerous countries, leading to the signature style that I have crafted today. My ideal design project would be the renovation of a residential home that takes all of these experiences and inspiration and translates them into an oasis. I would love to build a bed-and-breakfast-style resort and would take a lot of inspiration from my favorite designer, Abigail Ahern. I recently took her masterclass 'Designing Your Dream Home,' and I learned a lot from her eclectic, playful, and warm approach to design. She teaches 'breaking the rules' and 'following your instinct' which I can easily do since my inspiration comes from the numerous places I have lived around the world. This B&B style resort would include an earthy palette, the inclusion of exotic botanicals, and a lot of texture and layers. I would bring outdoor elements in, and then I would create an outdoor oasis that flowed naturally."
Anonymous Answer
"My dream job would be doing the interior design for clients that have homes abroad to allow me to travel while working. Two things I love the most! I would love exploring the culture and gain inspiration from my travels! Of course, this is my dream, and I look forward to all of the design experiences that I am offered in my career. Someday, I will achieve my dream! For now, gaining experience is my hope!"
Rachelle's Answer
Your goals are very exciting! I recommend wording this a bit differently so that it doesn't seem that this role is an 'until I get what I really want' type of opportunity. I have offered a slight revision, below.
"My two passions are design and travel! My dream career would include the opportunity to gain design inspiration from other cultures. I look forward to the design experiences offered by (company name) and working with your diverse client base."
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Anonymous Answer
"My ideal job would be to design spaces that truly make an impact on people's daily lives; Spaces that are visually pleasing and practical that support and enhance their daily routine. Nothing would make me happy than to work as an interior designer, day in and day out. Specifically, I would like to design residential homes for the public, but for now, gaining experience and developing my skills is my main goal."
Rachelle's Answer
Good revision! These added specifics will help the interviewer to picture your ideal career path.
"My ideal job would be to design spaces that truly make an impact on people's daily lives. Spaces that are visually pleasing and practical that support and enhance their daily routine. Nothing would make me happier than to work as an interior designer, day in and day out. Specifically, I would like to design residential homes for the public, but for now, gaining broader experience and developing my foundational design skills is my main goal."
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5.
Do you prefer functionality or appeal? Support your preference.
There is no right or wrong answer to this type of question. As an Interior Designer, you will have your preferences and individual reasoning behind those preferences. When you discuss functionality versus appeal, you can talk about projects in your past where you may have chosen one approach over the other.

Rachelle's Answer
"For me, this answer depends on the project. I have worked on a variety of projects with different desired outcomes, where my clients' goals will define whether I choose functionality over the appeal and vice versa. For instance, if I am designing a high-end boutique or salon, the project would need to be functional but also have great appeal. When designing a library or bookstore, I focus on functionality and sustainability while maintaining an overall vibe that guests will enjoy. In any set design project I have taken on, the priority is functionality as the sets need to move and be multi-purpose; however, the appeal still needs consideration."
Anonymous Answer
"I'm often told my style is classic and timeless, but I love how you can continue to discover your own style. But I would have to say I go for the more traditional design because I love creating a sense of coziness. The rooms have plenty of accessories, family pieces, and things I've discovered from traveling."
Rachelle's Answer
You do a very nice job describing your style, which will allow the interviewer to feel your passion for design.
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6.
Describe your design style. What factors or influences led you to your signature style?
The interviewer wants to get to know you better and understand the core of your inspiration as an Interior Designer. This question is a fantastic opportunity to show that you are passionate about your work while also giving the hiring authority a glimpse into why you chose a career in interior design.

Rachelle's Answer
"Growing up in a small town in the 1980s has left its mark on my design style, for sure! I have always loved the idea of the perfect small town in America with quaint shops and adorable storefronts where people are drinking soda out of glass bottles, and everyone knows each others' names. Growing up, living in North America meant freedom, joy, and success. Whether that was reality or not, I believed it for myself. I would bedazzle my bike and the bikes of my friends with glitter nail polish. I decorated my treehouse more often than I can count, using leftover wallpaper samples that our local paint shop owner would save for me. Today, my inspiration comes from the people and the landscape around me, and the feeling of security that I felt growing up. Through my journey, I found new influences through my photography and discovered unique perspectives from the art school education that I received. For all these reasons, I would describe my style as inspired by nature, traditional, and yet transitional. I will incorporate glass and steel and other modern materials, but then I like to warm those materials up with barn wood and plush furnishings. Sometimes my clients say that my style is 'a touch of glam with a dash of Americana,' and I can undoubtedly thank my upbringing for that!"
7.
What type of projects would you like to be involved in, to expand your interior design portfolio?
The interviewer would like to know what your goals are for your portfolio and design career. When you can clearly define your career goals, the hiring company will be able to pin-point whether this collaboration is a fit! Share a couple of design goals that you have for yourself when it comes to expanding your portfolio.

You might share that you dream of designing a specific type of space. Perhaps you dream of working on a team with a particular style of design. After discussing your career goals, be sure to tie them in with the opportunity presented.

Rachelle's Answer
"I have an interest in being involved in more commercial projects, such as the public library project that I mentioned previously. These projects are so different for me, and I learn a great deal, which makes them incredibly enticing. In terms of the library project, knowing that the end product was something that supported my community and made it better was very rewarding. I find joy in supporting my community and making it an even better place to live. When I saw that your firm focuses on a lot of government and community projects, I felt compelled to apply, and I am eager to grow my portfolio in these areas with your design firm."
8.
What do you know about sustainable design?
Interior Designers have a fantastic opportunity to embrace the use of renewable resources and materials in their designs. You can teach your clients about waste and help them to create beautiful designs based on improving the environment.

Discuss what you know about sustainable design, and include details on how you embrace sustainable design in your work. This question is also an excellent opportunity to mention what you know about the hiring company's sustainable design efforts.

Rachelle's Answer
"I view sustainable design as any design that works to reduce a negative impact on our environment. I care deeply about the environment, so I encourage sustainable design at all times. We all need to do our part to develop and create sustainable designs that do not harm the environment. I choose to use environmentally safe products and incorporate recycled items as often as possible. This approach to sustainable design takes careful consideration at each project stage. At times, these choices can be more costly; however, the materials are often more durable, lasting far longer than other fabricated materials. I do my part to upcycle and recycle everything that I can. If I am doing a residential or commercial renovation project, I will take note of what materials we can donate to non-profits, schools, or local low-income housing initiatives. As an Interior Designer, I have the opportunity to play an important part in protecting our environment, and I choose to design projects that do not require over-consumption of non-renewable materials. I was impressed to see that your firm earned an award for a recent hotel design that included sky terraces, holding nearly 1,000 planters filled with multiple species of plants. This project was impressive, and I would love to learn more about your firms' approach to sustainable design."
9.
How do you handle stressful situations, such as collaborating with uncooperative architects or tradespeople?
The interviewer needs to hear that stressful situations or potential conflict will not get the best of you when you are working on a project with personalities different from you. Show that you have an understanding of your responsibility as a professional to mitigate stressful situations and ensure they do not leave a negative impact on a project. If you have a story-based example, be sure to show your conflict resolution and stress-management skills in action.

Rachelle's Answer
"There can be a lot of pressure in this job when collaborating with architects and tradespeople. We all have timelines to meet, and some days, it can be a challenge to satisfy all of these deadlines. However, I find that as long as I maintain a professional and courteous attitude, most situations can be figured out before they turn into a conflict. Just last month, a situation became heated between a contractor and myself when he said that my design idea was 'impossible.' Luckily the architect was on-site and disagreed with the contractor. We were able to maintain respect for all opinions, and we verbally worked out the misunderstanding. I believe that every project is about the clients' vision and never about ego. As passionate professionals, it's essential for everyone involved in the project to keep this mantra in mind. Contractors, architects, and tradespeople are critical to every project, and without them, I could not be a successful Interior Designer. For that reason, I am always mindful of working as a positive team player."
Anonymous Answer
"From a personal perspective, I find that when I'm under the pressure of a deadline, I can do some of my most creative work. And if things get really tough, I find that going for a run/walk it’s a great stress reducer. Also meditating helps too."
Rachelle's Answer
These are wonderful ways to reduce stress and pressure! It's great that you work so creatively under pressure. If you could add in an example of a time when you delivered better work under pressure, that would strengthen your response even further.
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10.
Looking at your design portfolio, which project makes you most proud, and why?
The interviewer wants to see what makes you beam when you discuss your design portfolio. Think back to previous projects and be ready to present one project that feels extra special for you. Perhaps you made a great connection with the client, or maybe you were able to execute your clients' vision flawlessly. Discuss the project details, and be sure to let your enthusiasm shine!

Rachelle's Answer
"I have had the opportunity to have worked on some fantastic projects. The ones that I enjoy the most are when I can work with small business owners to bring their vision to life. I love helping them set up their shops and displays in a way that is visually appealing but also optimizes sales and the overall customer experience. It's rewarding to work with business owners who have a clear vision of what they want to draw out of a well-thought-out space. I have a few examples of small business projects in my portfolio; however, one that stands out the most for me was a bookstore that I worked on a couple of years ago. The owner was so knowledgeable about his merchandise and the retail industry but struggled with presenting his vision. We worked together and came up with color schemes, room layouts, and furniture ideas. This project has a special place for me because we worked so well together in coming up with a quaint and welcoming space that he and his customers love. I checked in with this client six months after his re-design, and he reported that sales had increased by 28%, which I thought was incredible!"
11.
What resources or publications do you lean on to keep current with design trends?
The interviewer would like to see that you rely on reputable resources when it comes to keeping your thumb on the beat of what is happening in the design world. Perhaps you follow renowned designers on Instagram. Or, maybe you immerse yourself in well-known blogs, read design books or magazines, and listen to design-related podcasts. Do you attend design conferences or seminars?

Whichever way you choose to remain in-the-know, be sure to provide the interviewer with essential details such as your top takeaways from your favorite resources and how these resources help you to improve as an Interior Designer.

Rachelle's Answer
"I utilize a variety of design resources to ensure that I have a 360 view of what is happening in the world of design. I enjoy the layout and creative content on Dribbble.com as they have great ideas, articles, and insight into what is trending. I use different design software for various projects, and those subscriptions often include articles and content that keep me informed and up to date on trends in graphic design, which I often implement into a physical design. I have been an avid follower of Apartment Therapy, House of Bohn, as well as Abigail Ahern, who I believe to be one of the top names in eclectic design at the moment. I also lean on 'The Fundamentals of Interior Design,' a book that is well known for outlining the key elements of design. I reference this book quite often as it paints a clear picture of what I do as a designer. This way, when a client asks what I do, I can reference back to this book and help them to understand my creative process. I love to be inspired by others, and luckily inspiration is found everywhere!"
12.
What do you love most about the interior design profession?
The interviewer wants to hear all about the passion that you bring to your career as an Interior Designer. Think about what makes you the happiest on a day-to-day basis and what keeps you motivated to deliver an exceptional design. Share what you love, and let your passion shine through!

Rachelle's Answer
"What I love about being an Interior Designer is that no day looks the same. One day I may be in a designer home goods store picking out throw pillows, and the next, I am checking out paint and fabric samples. I spend my days making spaces visually appealing, and what's not to love about that! I get to meet new people and hear about the vision that they have for their work or living spaces. Then, I get to make it happen. I love to witness ideas unfold as I work to achieve my clients' design goals. This career allows me to use my creative mind while also encouraging the analytical side of my thinking as I ensure balance in every design. It is my pleasure to bring color and life into other people's spaces."
13.
What tools or framework do you use to ensure that your project quotes are as accurate as possible?
Interior design is not all about making spaces beautiful. As an Interior Designer, you will also work with numbers and budgets - the 'not so fun' aspect of the work, at times. The interviewer wants to see that you place value on ensuring that a clients' budget is respected. Describe the tools and approaches that you use to ensure project quotes are accurate and budgets are respected.

Rachelle's Answer
"It is essential to me that my quotes are accurate, and that the client can trust that I respect every dollar spent on their project. To ensure accuracy, I use QuoteWerks, which is a quoting and proposal software that integrates with my Salesforce CRM. When quoting, I am sure to tag tasks clearly, assign them correctly, add due dates, and set reminder alerts. This high level of organizing ensures that time is always well-spent, and the client is never paying for idle time. I like to provide milestone updates to my clients, and the projects' financial status is always accessible to them."
14.
How do you gain buy-in from your client when presenting a design concept?
Of course, you are excellent with your clients, and generally speaking, they are excited about the design ideas that you present. You're a talented Interior Designer, after all! Share your approach when presenting design concepts, and discuss why your success rate with client buy-in is so high. Be sure also to address how you troubleshoot a situation where the client is not buying into your design concept. The tone of your reply should be that you are accomodating and that you listen to your clients' needs and vision.

Rachelle's Answer
"By the time I am presenting a design concept, I will have had the opportunity to get to know my client quite well. We will have built a good rapport, allowing me to present in a way that speaks to their vision. Because of this approach, I have a high success rate when it comes to gaining client buy-in. I am not a 'salesy' type of Interior Designer and will present an idea or concept only after I am confident that it will benefit my client. The clients' satisfaction is my number one priority, so if they are hesitant on a design, I will spend time asking specific questions surrounding their hesitation. Then, using this new information, I will look for a suitable alternative. It's important to offer choices; however, not too many options as that approach can also cause decision paralysis. In the end, my clients know that I have their best interest in mind and that I am passionate about bringing their design vision to life."
15.
If you were working on a design project and disagreed with someone on the team, how would you voice your opinion?
Giving your professional opinion is a pivotal part of your job as an Interior Designer. The interviewer wants to hear that you can express yourself clearly and with professionalism. Share your approach to giving opinions by describing your communication style. The key to a successful response is showing that you would never put someone down if you had an opposing viewpoint. Express how your communication approach is healthy and well-received by your existing team members.

Rachelle's Answer
"I always strive to deliver my opinion with the utmost respect, clarity, and sensitivity. I have completed training in communication and learned to be confident but also fair when I state an oppositional thought. I do not believe in bringing up every nit-picky thing unless it is an oversight that will impact the final project outcome. If possible, I would voice my opinion face-to-face, and privately. I often think of how I would want someone to disagree with me, and that would be with transparency, a well-supported argument, and with genuine care. Often, my team members mention that they appreciate how mindful I am in my verbal and written communication."
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