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Gartner Consulting Interview
Questions

27 Questions and Answers by Kelly Burlison
Published February 7th, 2019 | Kelly Burlison, MPH, is an experienced professional
with over ten years of experience interviewing in the health care field.
Job Interviews     Companies     Business     Management Consulting    

Question 1 of 27

Our best consultants continually grow and learn. What have you done to expand your knowledge in the past three months?

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1.

Our best consultants continually grow and learn. What have you done to expand your knowledge in the past three months?

Professional growth is vital and directly associated with the success you will see in your career. The interviewer would like to know that you understand the importance of expanding your knowledge and taking the lead in your own professional development. Perhaps you have taken coursework, attended a workshop, read books, or listen to podcasts. Share with the interviewer the ways that you invest in your career knowledge.

Kelly's Answer #1

"To expand my professional knowledge, I have started an online course through NYU on microeconomics. It was important to me that I take the initiative to learn more on this topic and keep my knowledge current. To grow personally, I have read a couple of books on leadership. I love to read and learn from other professionals and behavioral experts."

Kelly's Answer #2

"I appreciate that you have asked about professional development. It's a topic that is important to me. I have committed to reading one new book per month on a topic related to organizational development, leadership, and strategy. I listed to The Growth podcast every day, on my commute, to hear business turnaround stories. I find them inspiring."

2.

As a business process and operations expert, how do you approach a situation when a project is failing to progress and is not meeting its deliverables?

The interviewer is asking this question to determine how the candidate would approach a situation when a project is failing to progress, which often happens in IT and other professional environments. When a project is not meeting its goals or benchmarks, business process staff can assist project staff by analyzing the project plan and developing interventions to get the project back on track. There are a number of strategies the business process and operations staff member can use to ensure a project begins meeting its benchmarks, including but not limited to: redesigning the project plan or timeline, dedicating more resources to the project, introducing more efficient production strategies, such as LEAN methodologies, or reassigning project teams. The candidate can successfully answer this question by providing a specific example of how they have successfully turned a failing project around in the past.

Kelly's Answer #1

"As a business process and operations manager, I have often had to intervene on projects that were not meeting their benchmarks or goals for completion. In most of these cases, I have found that the failure to progress is not due to the lack of efforts of the project team, but because of misallocated or misused resources. For example, I recently had to assist a project manager on a project that was significantly behind on creating mapping logic for a data interface that we were preparing for. When the project manager came to me with her concerns, I took a look at the project plan and was able to find some essential steps in the project plan that were missing. After I identified these steps, I worked with the project manager to redesign her project plan and develop more detailed process flows, which helped the project get back on track."

Kelly's Answer #2

"I was just dealing type of situation last month. There was a software development project in my department's Project Management Office (PMO) that was supposed to have been closed out three months ago, and when the PMO Director came to me for help, he said the program was being sent back to development, because a significant bug was found in the beta-testing phase. The PMO Director was extremely frustrated, as this bug should have been identified in the alpha-testing phase, and this error caused an even more significant setback. Because this software program is a significant deliverable for our department and overall organization, the additional delay affected more than just the PMO itself. As the PMO Director and I looked through the project plan and resources, I decided it would be best to allocate additional testing resources to the project by hiring a technical vendor to assist. This way, it could relieve the burden from our internal team, and provide the expertise needed to conduct the software testing. Once the vendor took over the testing of the software, the project was successfully tested and was able to be rolled out without further delay."

Anonymous Answer

"The first thing I do is assess my team. I schedule one-on-one meetings with each of my team members to check in on how they are doing and ask if they have been meeting their individual goals. I will also do retrospectives with my team, where we reflect on meetings, individual work, communication, and milestones. This way, I can seek out the root problem and assess the best way to move forward."

Rachelle's Answer

You sound highly organized, receptive, and strategic. Solid response!

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3.

Tell me about a time where you made a great recommendation that you think would have greatly benefited your client, but they just didn't like it. What approach did you take to convince them?

It's a challenge when you have to deal with a company that has different opinions and management styles. Depending on whom you are working with, and their role and responsibility, you will likely have to craft a compelling value proposition to clearly show that your recommendations will yield a return on their investment in a relatively short time. Consultants know this all too well. Push back from the client comes from managers who either don't understand the idea, concept or solution, and how it will help the organization. This type of interview question is asked to see how you handle rejection from the client, and if you recommend another solution that might work better. In addition to a compelling value proposition, provide a similar example that you recommended to a client that worked very well and had a good return on their investment.

Kelly's Answer #1

"When someone doesn't like my ideas or recommendations, I don't take it personal. I show empathy towards people who may disagree with my ideas or recommended solutions. I understand that some people may not be clear about how the technology or solution works, and how it may benefit them. When it comes to change, it is sometimes difficult to implement change since people like the way they work, and get used to a certain routine at work. One of the approaches that I used to convince them that my recommended solution would benefit the company was to highlight the areas that directly benefited them, and how it would make their daily tasks easier to manage."

Kelly's Answer #2

"Another way I was able to convince this client that they need my recommended solution was that I gave them ownership and involvement in the project very early on so they could see first-hand where they would be able to realize the benefits that directly apply to their department. I made them feel they were an important part of the process. As an outsider (consultant) telling them how I could improve their operations, I know I had to be respectful to their concerns. I avoided confrontation, and took a non-intrusive approach to learn how they worked so I could document and show them exactly where they benefited from my recommendations."

4.

A client wants to implement a new software system that was recommended by a different division of the same company. How do you evaluate it to ensure it's the right choice?

It's not uncommon for many corporations with multiple locations or divisions to have different computer systems and networks that don't necessarily talk to each other. They may share a few common systems that allow them to communicate with other locations or business units to conduct business as usual. Since companies that are decentralized have systems, networks, and/or software that could differ from other locations, hiring managers will ask how you will gather information, who you will talk to, the method you will use to evaluate the new software, and how you will arrive at a decision to recommend or not recommend the software. Giving an example or short checklist of what you will cover in the evaluation process will be important.

Kelly's Answer #1

"I've been in similar situations like this before, and have consulted clients on what needs to be considered before a new software implementation can take place. In a consulting engagement, a proper discovery and background must be conducted on the business. This step is absolutely critical. If you don't understand why the customer is asking you to evaluate new software for their business, you'll miss the most important part of why you are evaluating the software. My experience has shown that if you find the compelling event or pain point that's prompting them to look at a new system, you'll know if it's the right choice for them."

Kelly's Answer #2

"There's a step-by-step process that I follow that yields great results when it comes to evaluating new software for a corporation or division. As mentioned earlier, a proper discovery of the business operations is critical. Let me walk you through the process I use as part of the discovery:

1. Have the client explain the need for the software and the problems they expect it to solve for them.

2. Ask if they have the technical expertise internally to maintain the software, or do they plan to outsource the maintenance for the software to an IT Consultant or firm.

3. Do an assessment of their current technology infrastructure to see if they can support this new software and if they need to purchase additional hardware to run the system.

4. Find out how many people would potentially need to be trained on the new software, starting with key personnel (Administrators/Power Users) managing the system.

5. Provide a comparison of similar software with similar features, benefits, along with a breakdown of pricing for each software solution, and what it will cost in the long run.

6. Ask when they want you to submit a report on your evaluation."

5.

What do you believe is the most important service we offer at Gartner Consulting?

Before your interview, take the time to comb through the Gartner Consulting website. From a clients' point of view, which service seems to offer the most value? Is there a particular service that is mentioned more than others, when you go through the materials and marketing by Gartner Consulting? Discuss what you believe to be the most essential service, and express why it is so significant.

Kelly's Answer #1

"What stands out the most to me is your teams' expertise in strategic workforce planning. When you can optimize a clients' workforce, and introduce them to cutting-edge tech in their industry, you can change their profitability exponentially. I agree with the statement on your website that agile organizations use strategic workforce planning to stand out from the competition."

Kelly's Answer #2

"From my research, I believe that a lot of your business comes from clients seeking cultural transformation and organizational development. The two go hand in hand, and it appears that Gartner Consulting believes you cannot have one without the other. I appreciate that you stand firm on your ability to help your clients define the culture that will deliver their best organizational strategy."

6.

Our clients have high expectations of our work, tell me about a time you worked with challenging time constraints, but were still able to exceed client expectations.

If I only had more time. I hear this all the time. It's a fact of life in the business world. Being prepared for situational questions that ask about project planning, resource planning, expectations, delivery, and how you anticipate distractions will show the hiring manager that you have meticulously planned and know each step in the process. Your answer should reflect the steps you take to resolve a problem, or minimize risk so problems don't occur. Walk the interviewer through one of the steps in the process, and detail how you address time constraints specifically, and how you are able to still meet client expectations. Detail this response with how you set up a project plan, the step-by-step approach, and why everyone needs to follow the process in order to avoid delays, and to deliver on time.

Kelly's Answer #1

"Almost every project will have time sensitivity challenges and deadlines that need to be met. I am very mindful of these things, and take the appropriate steps to ensure projects are planned properly with the appropriate amount of resources, technology, and approvals throughout the process. The way that I start and execute on a project is always with a project plan that serves as a roadmap for success. If I am to avoid time constraints and other challenges, I clearly identify the deliverables, and follow through on the most efficient way to produce them. In order to avoid distractions, I take a close look at design and test times, project risk, team focus, and management involvement so that we minimize delays from the executive level."

Kelly's Answer #2

"When I start a project, there are a number of tasks and milestones that I consider very carefully. The most important one is identifying risks up front to avoid surprises. I take a systematic approach to each step and phase of the project. It has been my experience that setting quality expectations in advance sets the tone for a much more favorable outcome for the project. Keeping a focus and not deviating from the original plan is important for meeting milestones and expectations. I understand that changes happen, and change management needs to be addressed if this happens. If or when change happens, we refocus the project using rapid application development RAD to stay on schedule so the delivery date of the project doesn't change."

7.

Have you ever supervised or trained junior consultants?

The interviewer would like to know more about the level of leadership responsibility you bring. Discuss if you have formally, or informally trained any other consultants throughout your career. If you have supervised or trained junior consultants, discuss how many, what your process was, and the tools and resources you used. If you have not managed or trained other consultants, that is okay too! Discuss the ways that you encourage and help your fellow employees, even if you do not have a formal leadership role.

Kelly's Answer #1

"I have not been asked to train any other consultants in my career formally; however, I do make it a habit of taking our firms' newer consultants under my wing to ensure they are off to a successful start. I will share with them some tools and resources that I find helpful, and remind them that my door is open whenever they have a question. I am very open to formal leadership opportunities should those arise with Gartner Consulting."

Kelly's Answer #2

"Throughout my career, I have trained over 25 new consultants. And, in my current role, I oversee the activities of 5 junior consultants. Strategic leadership and effective management are strengths of mine that I look forward to bringing to Gartner Consulting."

8.

In your opinion, why do companies need consultants?

There are many reasons why a company would hire a management consultancy:

- Identifying the misuse of resources
- Find workable solutions to situations they are too close to
- A convincing way to turn the tide, when opinionated boards or c-suites are stuck in their ways
- To uncover a fresh perspective to an antiquated system

This list highlights just a few reasons why a management consulting firm may be engaged. Think of your best guess why a company would want to bring an outside group in, and discuss your reasoning with the interviewer.

Kelly's Answer #1

"I believe every company needs a consultant group, at any stage in their business. Only the most invested will take that step and hire one. Some of the reasons may be pain points they remain stuck on, due to differing opinions in the c-suite. Others may be that their processes are antiquated, but no internal employee is knowledgeable enough to change that. Whatever the reason, I am prepared to show my new clients how wise it was to bring on Gartner Consulting to assist."

Kelly's Answer #2

"I previously worked for a company that hired a management consulting firm. Their reason was that they needed an outside perspective when it came to processes and spending. They wanted to scale but did not understand how to do so. It was a fascinating process, which sparked my interest in joining this industry."

9.

In consulting, much of your growth will come from feedback on client projects. How do you accept and implement feedback?

Being able to accept feedback graciously is a highly valued skill, especially in the consulting space, where you are continually putting yourself in vulnerable situations, where your recommendations and findings may not always be welcomed or understood. The interviewer wants to know that you accept feedback well, but they also want to see that you see the value of implementing immediate change. Show the interviewer that you:

- Ask for feedback often
- Listen to the input openly
- Take what you know to be important, and leave the rest
- Do not take the feedback personally
- Can take corrective action to implement change

Kelly's Answer #1

"I ask for feedback on a monthly basis from one of my toughest-to-please managers. Her feedback is accurate, and I trust it. Once she tells me what I could try doing differently, I will take the time to research and plan how I can implement the change. This practice has helped me grow in my career significantly."

Kelly's Answer #2

"At the end of every project I will give my clients, and their entire team, a survey focused specifically on my service, knowledge base, and if they felt they received the value from me that they expected. The feedback is blind, but I take every bit of it as though it came from the CEO of the company. I analyze the comments for common denominators as well. If the feedback is consistent, I will create a learning plan based around that common piece of feedback."

10.

Gartner Consulting seeks to hire those with strong problem solving skills. When were you able to successfully resolve a problem in the workplace?

Problem-solving and dispute resolution are critical skills to possess. Display to the interviewer that you are capable of problem-solving within the workplace. Talk about a time when you were creative, proactive, and displayed the leadership qualities required to resolve a workplace issue.

Kelly's Answer #1

"In my most recent position we had a consistent problem with employees showing up late for their shifts or calling in sick at the very last moment. Rather than the typical documenting and reprimanding style that management usually takes, I decided to track the results of an accountability reward system. For 180 days, my employees were rewarded for coming to work 10 minutes early. Also, for every month with zero sick days, a bonus was added. In the end, we awarded those with perfect attendance a $600 bonus. The bonus' cost us less money, in the end than the cost of lowered productivity due to absent employees. The program was a success, and upper management chose to keep it implemented for another six months. We will re-assess in December, but it seems to be working very well."

Kelly's Answer #2

"I was working in a clinic where the primary population was low income. We had a lot of concerns with patients not showing up for appointments when expected. The staff wanted to start double-booking patient time slots. Instead, I got permission to spend a day in a highly-rated clinic serving the same population. Instead of scheduling, they had these 'drop-in mornings' with a common waiting room. I took these methods and incorporated them into our setting. We did that twice a week, and it completely solved our scheduling problem."

11.

How do you approach your role in business processes and operations when your department or the Project Management Office (PMO) is operating smoothly or there are no pending improvement projects in the queue?

This question is very important to the interviewer, as it is important for them to know that the candidate understands that someone in the role of business processes and operations should be constantly looking for opportunities to improve their department and the PMO. Anticipating improvements and changes that can be made when operations are not in a state of flux will allow staff responsible for business processes and operations to work more effectively work project teams to make improvements to processes in order to eliminate waste and reduce variation. The candidate can successfully answer this question by providing examples of how they took initiative to make changes in their department or PMO when they were not specifically assigned a task or faced with a problem that needed an immediate solution.

Kelly's Answer #1

"If there are no immediate needs for improvement in my department or in the PMO that needs my attention, I look at the 'parking lot' of improvements that I maintain and determine what I have the capacity to take on at the time. Throughout the year, when requests or improvement projects that are not immediately needed are received, I put them on a parking lot to be addressed later. So, when there is additional time, I am able to prioritize the parking lot and choose an improvement project based on needs, capacity within my team, and the capacity each department has to take on an improvement project. I find this method very effective for continuously improving the department and PMO, and I can use the same or similar method at Gartner Consulting."

Kelly's Answer #2

"In times where there are no improvement tasks or projects, I do not rest on my laurels. Instead, I take the opportunity to assess the various areas within the IT department, the PMO, and the company, by speaking with leadership to determine what improvement projects we can start during these down times. I find that these down times are much easier to implement new processes or streamline existing processes, because staff members are not already overburdened with a project, and they are more willing to take on change. In order for me to be a successful Business Process and Operations Manager, I feel that I must always be finding ways to help my colleagues improve, and I will always take the initiative to get a project started when my workload is less in order ensure I am contributing in my position as much as I can."

Anonymous Answer

"When my projects are running smoothly, I don't take it as the time to sit back and relax. Instead, I view it as an opportunity to make significant progress in my work. I often use this lull to review and update finished work, explore areas of my work that were not high priority previously, or embark on the next phase of my project. I am a big believer that there is always more work to be done, even if that means learning something new by understanding a colleague's work."

Rachelle's Answer

Fantastic answer - very well said. Any interviewer should appreciate that you always take the opportunity to improve rather than sit back and relax.

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12.

We're a company of innovative thinkers; we rely upon our innovative thinking to solve client problems. Tell me about a time when you came up with a breakthrough idea that was not obvious to others. Describe your idea and how you developed it?

Innovation is the cornerstone of any successful company. If you show me a highly successful company, I will show you people within that company that were innovative thinkers. Great examples are Steve Jobs from Apple, Bill gates from Microsoft, and Jeff Bezos of Amazon just to name a few. The hiring manager is posing this as a two-part question to see if your response is clear, concise, and related to the question. Stay on point with your response, because that's what they're looking for. Think about this question for a minute to dissect what they are asking. They are a company of innovators.....which means, will you fit into their culture and be able to come up with ideas that will be innovative. They will be listening attentively to how you articulate your message about your breakthrough idea. Walk them through how you came up with the idea, what your thought process was, how you got approval to move forward, and how you executed on the idea.

Kelly's Answer #1

"I've always considered myself an Outside the Box thinker. Settling for the norm has never been my working style. I always work with the expectation that my idea will serve many purposes, and bring value to our customers. One example is when I came up with an idea to train the trainer at multiple locations via remote video conferencing. This idea was well received, and was implemented at over 50 locations worldwide. I came up with the idea because I was responsible for training multiple divisions and didn't have the budget to fly everyone in from multiple locations for the training sessions."

Kelly's Answer #2

"I was working on implementing a friendlier looking graphical user interface solution for a financial services client. The inspiration came from the feedback I received from people at the client site complaining about processing transactions on a mainframe computer that wasn't much fun to work with or look at. They were used to the dreaded Green Screen on a mainframe, but my solution had a Windows look and feel which they liked quite a lot."

13.

Help me understand your standards for success in your last job. Please describe what you did to attain those standards, and if you fell short of expectations, what did you do to remedy the problem?

If you look at companies of all sizes, you'll find different types of standards for each one of them. A smaller company's standards might differ from a larger one, and this could be based on processes, management and overall operations. They hiring manager in this case would like to hear if you value standards, and if you are involved in setting standards or following them. Ideally you want to explain that you have involvement with both. Start with some basic facts about the standards you have set, and how you have garnered support from leadership and have successfully maintained those standards over a long period of time. It's also important to talk about times you had challenges maintaining standards, and how you were able to remedy issues that came up, and regain the support of your teams. This shows the interviewer your human side, because everyone falls short of expectations at some point, but what you did to remedy the problem will be something they will pay close attention to.

Kelly's Answer #1

"There are standards that I follow which have made me successful. I start by putting together a winning team. The way that I select a team is I look for winning attitudes, and quality attributes that fit within our team dynamics. Each team member must possess a willingness to learn from failures, and the eagerness to practice and improve even under challenging deadlines. Each person on my team has to accept ownership of their role, and be accountable for their work. Lastly, each and every person on my team has to be respectful to each other."

Kelly's Answer #2

"When it comes to standards, there are many ways to measure success. For me, customer satisfaction is a very important measurable metric. It's my job to figure out what the client is looking for in order to ensure complete satisfaction. I admit, client satisfaction isn't always easy to measure, but once you develop a system that allows them to measure success, you will have a better idea of how to meet their needs. This is a common practice that I developed and use with all my customers. In rare cases where I fell short of my client's expectations, I always examine where things went wrong, and implement a change to immediately right the ship. It could be a number of things like budget, bureaucracy, unrealistic timelines, etc. I document all project cases so I prevent failures in the future."

14.

Who are our clients at Gartner Consulting?

Before your interview, it's vital that you have a full understanding of the industries and clients that Gartner Consulting serves. You will find this information on their website, press releases, social media, or even a Google search. If you have worked with similar clients in the past, you can mention this, to show the interviewer that you are already familiar with the type of accounts you may be handling, should you be the successful candidate.

Kelly's Answer #1

"I understand that Gartner Consulting works primarily with Fortune 500 companies in the medical, technology, and SaaS industries. I have a similar client portfolio, with smaller companies who have between 500-1000 employees."

Kelly's Answer #2

"Through my research, I saw that Gartner Consulting serves over 76% of Fortune 100 companies and more than 92% of Fortune 500 companies. I also understand that your clients span industries such as energy, financial services, Public services, and media/communications. The bulk of my experience is in the energy sector, and I look forward to making an impact in that area while learning more about your client scope."

15.

Your client is considering entering a new market. They have a choice of buying an existing company, or developing the technology in-house. What approach would you take about advising them on making the best business decision?

In this case, Gartner Consulting wants to assess your business consulting knowledge of mergers and acquisitions, and if you're qualified to advise them on entering into a new market which they may not be familiar with. It's best to start with your knowledge of Mergers and Acquisitions, and how you advised companies in a similar situation. Highlight the risks and rewards involved in such an endeavor, and use a case study to prove your point. They may also want to pick your brains and get your opinion on whether it makes more business sense to acquire a company with a complementary product or develop a new product.

Kelly's Answer #1

"Mergers and Acquisitions were big in the late 1990s, and that's the first time I was part of a merger/acquisition deal. It taught me a lot and made me the consulting professional I am today. The consulting approach I took was to look at the business drivers, and what the company wanted to achieve financially. It was important for me to understand what their plans were to scale that particular product line, and what the branding campaign was going be. I conducted research for both scenarios, and presented my findings in the form of a report with my recommendations, and how I arrived at my recommendations."

Kelly's Answer #2

"When I'm consulting a client about entering a new market or acquiring an existing company, I look at a number of different things to determine whether developing a new product internally, or acquiring a company that compliments their existing product line up is the right decision. I typically go through a series of questions to better understand their business motives. Here's a list of questions that I would ask:

1. Current state of manufacturing capabilities - are they able to produce a similar or better product at quantities that will be competitive?
2. Is there a market for this new product?
3. Research the competition - who owns the majority of the market share
4. Is this product seasonal or sold year-round?
5. Do they have internal expertise to develop a new product?
6. Are there any laws or legislation that would restrict or prevent the manufacture of that new product outside the US?
7. What the market plan to scale this product?"

Anonymous Answer

"First, I would ask: why does the company want to enter this new market? Who are the market's major market players, and is their room to move into the market? Are there any barriers to entry or exit? I would analyze the advantages and disadvantages of each option. If they are buying an existing company, what are the synergies involved? Do the companies' cultures mesh well? What are the revenues/profits of this company in the past three years, and what is its market share? What is the price of acquiring this company? For developing the technology in house, do they have the means to do this? Will they use their current suppliers and distribution channels for this new product, or will they need to build their infrastructure? How much of the market are they hoping to capture? What are the costs associated with developing this technology in house? How will competitors react?"

Rachelle's Answer

It seems that you would have many exceptional and insightful questions for your client. Very thoughtful, well-rounded response.

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27 Gartner Consulting Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.

Interview Questions

  1. Our best consultants continually grow and learn. What have you done to expand your knowledge in the past three months?
  2. As a business process and operations expert, how do you approach a situation when a project is failing to progress and is not meeting its deliverables?
  3. Tell me about a time where you made a great recommendation that you think would have greatly benefited your client, but they just didn't like it. What approach did you take to convince them?
  4. A client wants to implement a new software system that was recommended by a different division of the same company. How do you evaluate it to ensure it's the right choice?
  5. What do you believe is the most important service we offer at Gartner Consulting?
  6. Our clients have high expectations of our work, tell me about a time you worked with challenging time constraints, but were still able to exceed client expectations.
  7. Have you ever supervised or trained junior consultants?
  8. In your opinion, why do companies need consultants?
  9. In consulting, much of your growth will come from feedback on client projects. How do you accept and implement feedback?
  10. Gartner Consulting seeks to hire those with strong problem solving skills. When were you able to successfully resolve a problem in the workplace?
  11. How do you approach your role in business processes and operations when your department or the Project Management Office (PMO) is operating smoothly or there are no pending improvement projects in the queue?
  12. We're a company of innovative thinkers; we rely upon our innovative thinking to solve client problems. Tell me about a time when you came up with a breakthrough idea that was not obvious to others. Describe your idea and how you developed it?
  13. Help me understand your standards for success in your last job. Please describe what you did to attain those standards, and if you fell short of expectations, what did you do to remedy the problem?
  14. Who are our clients at Gartner Consulting?
  15. Your client is considering entering a new market. They have a choice of buying an existing company, or developing the technology in-house. What approach would you take about advising them on making the best business decision?
  16. How do you approach vendor and purchasing management in your role in business processes and operations?
  17. Are you LEAN Six Sigma certified?
  18. How do you assess a clients' current technology systems and solutions?
  19. The way we approach clients in our business is we identify client needs and recommend solutions to their needs. Tell me about a time when your knowledge and expertise allowed you to make a recommendation to resolve a problem or address a pain point?
  20. What is the highest ROI percentage you have delivered to a client?
  21. As part of the IT team, how do you approach your role in the implementation and roll out of new software and technical programs?
  22. Do you consider yourself a persuasive person?
  23. What have you done in the last few months to strengthen your professional network?
  24. What steps do you take when researching a new market or industry?
  25. Gartner Consulting works with clients across many industries. Which of our clients' industries interests you the most?
  26. Describe a time you helped implement a new technology for your client. Did you encounter any challenges, and how did you address them?
  27. Listening to our clients is absolutely essential to understanding their business and technology needs. Tell me about a time when you're listening skills helped exceed their expectations in the delivery of the project?
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