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Paramedic Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated August 22nd, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Question 1 of 30
What was your schedule at your last position? Are you okay adjusting to a new shift?
View Answer
How to Answer
Be flexible! Since you have most likely been working as an EMT for a while to prepare you to get to this point, you understand that your schedule can be a little crazy. Here's an example of a response:

"Do you have specific shifts you need covered right now? I understand I will need to be on-call at times and longer hours may be needed and I'm happy to work. I can do 24-hour shifts and I understand things can change week to week."

With scheduling questions it's typically a good idea to ask them what they need and be clear on expectations. If you list your needs before you know what's even available, you may be shooting yourself in the foot. If they expect you to work 24-hour shifts, don't ask for 12 hour shifts. Above all, be flexible and enthusiastic. Usually it's difficult to get your ideal schedule when you are new to the team, so try not to be too picky. And understand that your schedule may be as unpredictable as the emergency calls you get on the job.
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1.
What was your schedule at your last position? Are you okay adjusting to a new shift?
Be flexible! Since you have most likely been working as an EMT for a while to prepare you to get to this point, you understand that your schedule can be a little crazy. Here's an example of a response:

"Do you have specific shifts you need covered right now? I understand I will need to be on-call at times and longer hours may be needed and I'm happy to work. I can do 24-hour shifts and I understand things can change week to week."

With scheduling questions it's typically a good idea to ask them what they need and be clear on expectations. If you list your needs before you know what's even available, you may be shooting yourself in the foot. If they expect you to work 24-hour shifts, don't ask for 12 hour shifts. Above all, be flexible and enthusiastic. Usually it's difficult to get your ideal schedule when you are new to the team, so try not to be too picky. And understand that your schedule may be as unpredictable as the emergency calls you get on the job.
Rachelle's Answer
"Do you have specific shifts you need covered right now? I understand I will need to be on-call at times and longer hours may be needed and I'm happy to work. I can do 24-hour shifts and I understand things can change week to week."
2.
What are a few traits you think a paramedic needs to have?
In thinking about the nature of the job, try to focus on the key qualities that make a good paramedic. Sound judgement, passion for medicine and a love for helping people are all important qualities. Dedication, reliability and intelligence are also highly important. As you prepare for this interview, create a list of qualities that correspond to the responsibilities of the job description. For example, filling out patient care reports requires a person to be detail oriented and consistent. Assessing patients and identifying next steps requires knowledge and good judgement. What do you think are the most important traits from your experience?
3.
How would you handle working with a teammate with less experience that caused you to carry the workload?
It's likely that this situation will occur, especially considering the differing levels of experience between EMT's and Paramedics. You will have more varying types of responsibilities as a Paramedic and may be partnered with an EMT with much less experience. How will you handle it? How have you handled this type of scenario in the past? You'll be spending quite a bit of time with your partners on the job, so strategy will be important if you're faced with this type of challenge. You may want to see this as a teaching opportunity. If your partner is interested in learning more, perhaps you can help them advance in their knowledge. Communication will be vital. If your teammate is receptive, perhaps you can tell them what you observe to be happening and see how the two of you can remedy the situation.

Your interviewer wants to know that you are a team player, even if your teammate is dragging you down. So put on your thinking cap! How can you communicate effectively with your teammate to boost that relationship to build a power team?
4.
What can you bring to the job that exceeds what other candidates can bring?
What makes you stand out? You may have shown your knowledge and expertise through answering some tough questions about the types of scenarios you might anticipate. Now's the time to talk about your strengths, accomplishments and how you will do an outstanding job above the rest. The average paramedic might meet the responsibilities and basic qualifications, but you have more to offer than that! Talk about how you trained your partner on a new routine procedure or how you implemented a new system that improved the transport process, ultimately saving time and lives! You may have more meager accomplishments but even the little things like having a great attitude can make a huge difference.
5.
What motivates you?
At the end of the day after you have seen car accidents, suicide attempts, and the most depressing sides of human nature, how do you keep yourself going? Many paramedics burn out or quit after experiencing the volume of trauma day after day. Tell the interviewer if you are you motivated by saving lives or working towards going to school to become a physician's assistant.

Rachelle's Answer
"My experiences in this field have been invaluable. I have learned so many skills that I will be able to use when I work as a nurse in the ER. My goal is to complete nursing school in the next three years."
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