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Physical Therapist Interview
Questions

34 Questions and Answers by Ryan Brunner

Updated August 22nd, 2018 | Ryan has over 10 years of experience interviewing
candidates in the healthcare, public service, and private manufacturing/distribution industries.
Job Interviews     Careers     Health    
Question 1 of 34
Are you physically fit and do you exercise?
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How to Answer
As a Physical Therapist, it's important to 'practice what you preach.' Promoting a healthy lifestyle, eating habits, and exercise will only go so far if you aren't in shape yourself. Do you do yoga? Run marathons? Walk your dog each night? Do you stay away from sugar and starches? Are you a vegetarian? Tell the interviewer how you stay healthy and how you encourage your patients to do the same.
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Answer Examples
1.
Are you physically fit and do you exercise?
As a Physical Therapist, it's important to 'practice what you preach.' Promoting a healthy lifestyle, eating habits, and exercise will only go so far if you aren't in shape yourself. Do you do yoga? Run marathons? Walk your dog each night? Do you stay away from sugar and starches? Are you a vegetarian? Tell the interviewer how you stay healthy and how you encourage your patients to do the same.

Ryan's Answer #1
"I find myself running, exercising and dancing alongside my patients. I love to be apart of my treatment with my patients. It motivates them, helps the time go by and keeps me in shape as well."
Ryan's Answer #2
"Part of my motivation to become a Physical Therapist was my lifelong desire to stay physically fit myself. Outside of work, I am a dedicated long distance runner that participates in a couple of marathons each year. I also actively play volleyball as well."
Anonymous Answer
"I consider my self as a person who likes to be active with sports and other outdoor activities, and I always try to keep my physical health and fitness in good condition, which is something essential for a physically demanding job like a physical therapist. I like to lead by example, meaning that while promoting a healthy and active lifestyle to my patients, I have to support that kind of lifestyle myself. That is something that I believe inspires and motivates them and something that definitely can have an impact on their treatment process."
Rachelle's Answer
Good point re: being a good example to your patients by promoting a healthy and active lifestyle!
"I like to be active with sports and other outdoor activities, and I always keep my physical health and fitness in good condition. Being fit and healthy is essential for a physically demanding job like a physical therapist. I like to lead by example, meaning that while promoting a healthy and active lifestyle to my patients, I have to support that kind of lifestyle myself. That is something that I believe inspires and motivates them and something that can positively impact their treatment process."
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2.
Which population are you excited to work with?
Are you interviewing for a position that works with a population you haven't worked with before? No worries, this could be your chance to provide input with a new set of eyes. Conversely, if you have a preferred population that you prefer to work with or have expertise with, let the interviewer know.

Ryan's Answer #1
"I'm excited to get the chance to work with children. In my past positions, I've only worked with adults. I'm excited to tap back into my internship days and work with kids again."
Ryan's Answer #2
"My journey to become a Physical Therapist began when I was rehabbing a sports injury in high school. I'm most looking forward to working with athletes and other patients on orthopedic related rehabilitation issues."
Anonymous Answer
"I don’t have a particular type of population that I like working with. As long as I can offer my services to an individual who needs physical therapy, then I would be excited to be a part of his rehabilitation process. Also, I believe that having to work with patients from different age groups and deal with a plethora of conditions would make my work more challenging and help me grow as a professional."
Rachelle's Answer
Great answer! The interviewer will be happy to see that you welcome diversity in your day.
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3.
What brings stress to your world as a Physical Therapist? How do you handle stressful situations in the workplace?
A career as a Physical Therapist can bring stress to your life in many different ways. For this question, it is okay to be open and honest about the parts of the job that cause you stress. The interviewer will be looking to gain insight on what causes you stress and how you handle those situations. If you've found a particular part of the job to be stressful but you've made personal strides to overcome the stress, make sure to let the interviewer know.

Ryan's Answer #1
"Throughout my career, I've taken personal pride in the progress of my patients and I've found myself most stressed when a particular patient is rehabbing according to my plan. Over time, I've learned to analyze the progress of each patient individually and take into account personal pieces from each patient that may be impeding on their progress."
Ryan's Answer #2
"As a new Physical Therapist, I may feel stressed at times when the patient schedule is full. Throughout college, I learned great techniques to help manage my time when my schedule if full and I see myself being able to utilize these same techniques with my patient load."
Anonymous Answer
"For me personally, the thing that stresses me the most by being a physical therapist is when I don’t have much time to assess and educate a patient with a more complex condition. That’s because normally we have available the same amount of time for all the patients, no matter if it is a meniscus tear or a neck injury with neurological symptoms. So in this kind of situations, I try to give as much of the important information as I can and leave the less important ones for a follow-up appointment, so I could be both effective with my particular patient and also be on time without causing any sort of delays with my upcoming appointments."
Rachelle's Answer
It's very understandable how this could cause stress! I have worked on your response a bit to help with clarity and flow.
"What brings the most stress is when I do not have much time to assess and educate a patient with a complex condition. In my current role, we have the same amount of time for all patients, no matter if it is a meniscus tear or a neck injury with neurological symptoms. So in this kind of situation, I try to give as much of the important information as I can and leave the less important details for a follow-up appointment. With this approach, I can be effective with my patients and also be on time without causing any delays for others."
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4.
Describe the steps you take when reviewing a patients medication.
Although you don't prescribe medication, you do have the opportunity to review your patient's medication with them. Tell the interviewer how you review medication to assure the patient understands why they are taking it and how to take it.

Ryan's Answer #1
"I encourage my patients to bring their medications to the appointment. We review what each is for and how they are to take it. If I'm unable to answer their questions, I get the answers from their pharmacist or refer them back to their physican."
Ryan's Answer #2
"Through my schooling and training to become a Physical Therapist, I learned the importance of understanding both the prescribed and over-the-counter medications that my patients are taking and the relation that they play in their rehabilitation. I will talk to my patients about the medications that they take and the effect that they could potentially have on their rehab process."
Anonymous Answer
"From my past experience I know that medication can have a major effect in a patients energy levels or even his mood and behavior, so I always ask them during the history taking if they’re taking any medication so I could do my research on them and see the possible side effects that they could cause to my patient. If I find it necessary, I will contact their doctor for further instructions.
"
Rachelle's Answer
These steps are very smart. Good response!
"From experience, I know that medication can have a major impact on a patients' energy level or even their mood and behavior. When taking their initial history, I always ask them if they’re taking any medication so that I can do my research on those drugs and see the possible side effects on my patient. If I find it necessary, I will contact their doctor for further instructions."
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5.
Being with a single patient for an hour can be tiring, how can you overcome that?
Stamina is important while seeing your patients for treatment. Do you break up an appointment with small talk? Humor? Tell the interviewer about a particularly lengthy appointment you had and how you overcame the physical and emotional exhaustion.

Ryan's Answer #1
"Besides a good night sleep and comfortable footwear, I find that starting a casual conversation with my clients helps the session go quickly and helps them keep their mind off of any pain they may experience during our treatment."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my internship, I learned from my supervising therapist that getting to know each individual patient and talking with them was vital to both the patient and to me as their therapist. For the patient, they can get to know me and trust me throughout the process. For me as the therapist, I can learn about what motivates the patient in their treatment and use that to better work with them."
Anonymous Answer
"Personally I feel that having a longer therapy session with a patient, gives us both the opportunity to build a better patient/physiotherapist relationship and also gives me the opportunity to educate him in-depth throughout the course of the session, something that I wouldn’t be able to do to the same degree in a typical therapy session."
Rachelle's Answer
The interviewer will be happy to hear that you are energized from one-on-one interaction versus feeling drained from the experience. Good answer!
"Personally I feel that having a longer therapy session with a patient, gives us both the opportunity to build a better patient/physiotherapist relationship and also gives me the opportunity to educate them in depth throughout the course of the session; something that I wouldn’t be able to do to the same degree in a typical therapy session."
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6.
Tell me about a situation where you showed a great deal of patience?
As a Physical Therapist, you display patience every day with your patients as well as with other medical staff. Tell the interviewer about times that your patience is tested and what situations you find yourself being patient in most. Be sure to tell the interviewer that when your patience is tested you handle it calmly and with a smile.

Ryan's Answer #1
"I love working with children and have found that a bit of extra patience is needed in order to accomplish the treatment that I've set for the patient. I enjoy incorporating games with treatment which is sometimes necessary in order to get a response from a young patient."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my internship, I was working with an elderly patient that was recovering from a double knee replacement. The patient became very frustrated during our first therapy session when they were barely able to stand, let alone walk completely like they had when they were younger. When the patient became frustrated at himself for not being able to walk, I calmly explained to him the entire process of rehabbing a knee replacement surgery. By remaining calm and reiterating the timeline for him, he left our first session in a much better place and remained in that mindset each and every time I saw him from there."
Anonymous Answer
"In our profession, it is very common to be working on patients that are upset, frustrated, or even aggressive. To be more specific, I had to work with an elderly patient who was very prejudiced against physical therapy due to his previous experience and made him negative and hard to work with. But I managed to display patience and politely tried to explain to him in detail the process that we had to follow to change the situation he was dealing with. And it worked out pretty well because after that he showed a willingness to cooperate and that led to a positive treatment outcome, where he was able to carry out with his daily life activities.
"
Rachelle's Answer
Your example is well laid out, and shows your ability to maintain patience and fortitude. Nice answer!
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7.
Talk about a recent problem that you faced as a Physical Therapist. How did you go about solving the problem?
For this question, the interviewer is looking to assess your problem solving skills and your people skills. Be sure to think of a situation where you took on a challenge, used critical thinking and got a great result out of the situation. The interviewer will be looking for you to learn something from the situation moving forward as well.

Ryan's Answer #1
"The most difficult problem I faced recently was working with my schedule to get two walk-in appointments in between scheduled patients. I made a point to explain to the walk-ins that I would do my best to get them in but they may have to wait a bit. The fact that I was up front with the possibility that they could wait made them understand why they had to wait a bit longer than normal. After communicating with my team, another therapist was able to help out with one of my regularly scheduled appointments and we made the situation work."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my internship, I was given a lot of freedom to work with patients without my supervising therapist present. I had a patient that was rehabbing a sports injury to their knee who had recently been in a car accident. During the accident, the patient had felt some neck pain but had not had it treated. Once the patient had consulted me regarding the neck pain, I was unsure how to handle the situation moving forward. I explained to the patient that I wanted to get the expertise of my superior and they were very understanding. After speaking with my supervising therapist, we made the recommendation for the patient to see their primary care doctor for the neck pain. In situation like this as a new Physical Therapist, I won't hesitate to seek the advice from my colleagues."
Anonymous Answer
"I remember having a male patient who was always indolent and in a lethargic state, and I couldn’t understand why until I spoke with his wife and was told that he was taking medication due to his aggressive behavior. So, then I talked with his doctor that prescribed his medication and we agreed to reduce his dose to see if that was the reason of his low levels of energy etc. And so we did and a couple of days later you could see literally a different person, more active and communicative, and it was that point that he was starting to have improvement in his strength, stamina and level of mobility and function. 
"
Rachelle's Answer
It's wonderful that you noticed this behavior and inquired; rather than just doing the basics and moving on. This example shows a willingness to go over and above for your patients. Well done!
"I had a male patient who was always indolent and in a lethargic state. I couldn’t understand why until I spoke with his wife, who said he was taking medication due to his aggressive behavior. Then, I talked with his doctor, who prescribed his medication, and we agreed to reduce his dose to see if that was causing his low energy levels. A couple of days later, you could see a different person, more active and communicative. From this point, we began to see improvement in his strength, stamina, and level of mobility and function."
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8.
How would your co-workers describe you?
This question may be asked for a few different reasons. The interviewer may compare your self-assessment to what your references said about you or the interviewer might actually want to see how you view yourself. Now is an opportunity for you to be honest with your interviewer on your skills in working with others and how your co-workers view you. Don't come across as smug or gloating in your answer and try to talk about direct feedback that you've received.

Ryan's Answer #1
"My co-workers would describe me as a patient-focused Physical Therapist that puts the needs of my patients first and foremost. With my current employer, I received the 'Patient Care Excellence' award last year based on survey data from my patients and that is the proudest achievement of my career."
Ryan's Answer #2
"Any of my past co-workers would say that I am a dedicated employee that is eager to learn and better myself in my profession. During my internship, my supervising therapist would tell you that I was willing to jump right in and learn with a hands on approach and was willing to ask questions when needed."
Anonymous Answer
"I believe that my coworkers would describe me as a hard-working person that is willing to go the extra mile for his job to help his department to meet its goals. Also, I would like to believe that they would describe me as a team-player who’s always ready to help anyone when in need. 
"
Rachelle's Answer
Good! The interviewer will get a great idea of your teamwork abilities and collaboration skills.
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9.
What work setting do you prefer?
Interviewers ask this question to establish how well you will fit in at the company and with the company culture. It also helps them identify your most productive environment. Most often, the company's size, the work-life balance, the leadership style, and the office structure will make up the work environment.

Ryan's Answer #1
"The type of work setting I prefer most is one that has a good work-life balance and positive energy. I thrive on human interaction and I am a person that needs this one a day to day basis."
Ryan's Answer #2
"As a new Physical Therapist, my perfect setting will be a team based environment where I will be able to learn and grow as a professional with the help of others. Being new to a team, I would hope to bring new life and new ideas to my colleagues while being able to soak up all of the knowledge I can from them in return."
Anonymous Answer
"I don’t have any preferable work setting, because I believe that in different work settings, you will find different pros and cons that will help you learn and grow as a professional and developing different kinds of skills. For example, I feel more comfortable and flexible working independently where I can improve my organizational and multitasking skills, whereas being a member of a team, I would be able to learn from the more experienced colleagues, and in addition I'd have the opportunity to develop my team-working skills."
Rachelle's Answer
You show good balance here which will give the interviewer the impression that you can handle most work settings. I have tweaked the wording slightly to make it more personal.
"I don’t have any preferable work setting, because I believe that different work settings will offer me various pros and cons to help me grow as a professional. For example, I feel more comfortable and flexible working independently where I can improve my organizational and multitasking skills, whereas being a member of a team, I can learn from more experienced colleagues and develop my team-working skills."
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10.
How would you handle a situation where a patient you had been working with requested another therapist or a move to another therapy clinic?
During the career of any even great therapist, they may have experienced a time where a patient requested another therapist to work with them. The reasons for why the patient did so are important to find out. The interviewer is looking to see how you would handle this situation and how you would go about finding out why the change was requested. Learning from a situation like this is of critical importance. If it has happened to you in your career, don't hesitate to talk about a specific situation rather than a hypothetical situation.

Ryan's Answer #1
"Fortunately, I've never had a patient request this at this point of my career. If it were to happen, I would first review all of my interactions with the patient to see if there was anything I could see that may have sent the patient to another therapist. If not, I wouldn't hesitate to talk to the source from who I found out the patient was leaving. If it was the patient directly, I would ask for their reason why they are leaving. If it was from my manager, I would if they knew the reasons why. This would be a great learning situation that I could use for future patient interactions."
Ryan's Answer #2
"Having never been in this situation, I would want to know why the patient had requested another therapist and use that as a learning situation. If the reason was due to any interactions that I had with the patient, I would want to know. If it was for personal reasons from the patient, I have pretty thick skin and would be able to handle the news with ease."
Anonymous Answer
"Although I have never been in a situation like this, I would first discuss it with my manager or/and the patient in order to know the reasons behind the request. After knowing the reason, if there was something I could do in terms of making modifications in the patient's treatment plan or schedule, then I would be able to adapt to it. If there wasn’t anything I could really do, then I would respect my patient's request, and I would wish him the best and a speedy recovery."
Rachelle's Answer
Your answer shows a lot of self-awareness (first, what can I do better?) and also a genuine care for your patients (wishing them the best).
"Although I have never been in a situation like this, I would first discuss it with my manager or/and the patient to know the reasons behind the request. After knowing the reasons, if there were something I could do in terms of making modifications in the patient's treatment plan or schedule, then I would be able to adapt. If there weren’t anything I could do, then I would respect my patient's request, and I would wish them the best and a speedy recovery."
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11.
Talk about a time there was miscommunication in the treatment of a patient. How did you handle that situation?
As a Physical Therapist, the patients that are referred to you can come from many different physicians. Miscommunications on patients can happen and the interview is looking to see how you handled a particular miscommunication between yourself and a physician. In your answer, make sure to point out the importance communication plays in the overall well-being of the patient and that you are not hesitant to follow-up on communication.

Ryan's Answer #1
"In my current organization, I receive patient referrals from many physicians on patients that need PT on their knees. Without having direct access to the patients medical records through their physician, my administrative staff are great about obtaining records in a timely manner. Recently, I had a new patient come in that we hadn't received medical records for. Rather than relying solely on what the patient told me, I made a quick phone call over to the physicians office to have the records quickly faxed over. After verifying the release form was signed on their end, I had the medical record within ten minutes. I fully realize that since some patients don't fully understand their medical history so the call to expedite the process was vital."
Ryan's Answer #2
"While I haven't experienced this directly in patient care while interning as a Physical Therapist, I know that we work in a world where communication is extremely important. If I every learned that there was a miscommunication on a patient, I would do my best to get to the root of miscommunication to ensure that it doesn't happen again. If needed, I would talk with my manager as well to hopefully prevent it from happening again."
Anonymous Answer
"During my internship I had experienced a lot of miscommunication incidents, for instance, I used to treat a group of badly injured soldiers from the civil war in Libya and because of the fact that we have to communicate through a translator, there were some issues with the schedule of the therapies, cause the management were giving me a timetable that was interfering with their prayer times so we couldn’t do anything at that point or at any other point due to the tight schedule that I had. So my supervisor and I arranged a meeting between us, the management, and the translator to settle that issue, so we could provide our services to this group of patients at a time of their convenience, something that we successfully did and so we had no further problems in the future.
"
Rachelle's Answer
Wow - this example is so interesting. I love that you used such a memorable story. You show an ability to facilitate clear communication and skills in exercising cultural sensitivity. Well done. I have tweaked your response a bit, to help with flow.
"During my internship, I experienced miscommunication at times. I used to treat a group of badly injured soldiers from the civil war in Libya. Because we had to communicate through a translator, there were some issues with the therapy schedule. Mainly, the management gave me a schedule that interfered with the soldiers' prayer times so that we couldn’t treat them during those timeframes. My supervisor and I arranged a meeting between us, management, and the translator to settle the issue, allowing us to provide our services to this group of patients at a more convenient time."
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12.
Describe your typical work week.
Before you answer, consider the position you are applying for and how your current or past positions relate to it. The more you can connect your past experience with the job opening, the more successful you will be in answering the questions. Keep your answers focused on work and show the interviewer that you're organized and efficient.

Ryan's Answer #1
"The first thing I do on Monday morning is to check my voicemail and email, then I prioritize my activities for the week. Each morning, I also make a to do list for the day so I am prepared along the way in knowing my schedule. I hold evening hours on Wednesdays and early morning hours on Fridays for patients that prefer to be seen during those times as well. At the end of each day, I make time for any administrative tasks that I need to catch up on as well."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my internship, a typical work week involved 4-6 hours of direct patient contact every day. At the end of every workday, I utilized my Outlook calendar to make a plan for the next day and worked in time for my documentation duties as well. By staying organized each day, it ensured that the following day ran as smoothly as possible."
13.
What is your style of leadership?
If you're leading well, you won't have just one leadership style. You'll mix and match to engage your team and meet your goals. Let the interviewer know you understand new challenges require new leadership skills, behaviors, and ways of communicating with your team. Do you monitor performance and provide feedback to your team? Do you prefer to stay out of the limelight and let team accept credit for results?

Ryan's Answer #1
"With my style of leadership, I include the whole team in decision making and provide tools to get the job done. I know that tailoring my leadership to each individual is important as people prefer to be led in different manners."
Ryan's Answer #2
"As a new Physical Therapist, the thing I'm most looking forward to is leading a team of PT Assistants. I am a leader that believes in leading by example and putting what I preach into practice. I know that communication is key to have a highly functioning team and my assistants will easily find that I'm approachable, understanding and fair."
Anonymous Answer
"I feel that as a leader, I can identify the strengths in each of my team members, and then I distribute the roles and responsibilities according to them to guarantee the best results. I believe that communication, exchange of ideas, and mutual respect are the keys to success inside a team."
Rachelle's Answer
Well said! This is very good answer that any interviewer should appreciate.
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Anonymous Answer
"I have always stepped up to accept challenges and have been viewed as a very compassionate and reliable person by my peers. I am genuinely enthusiastic about helping others."
Rachelle's Answer
Awesome! This answer makes me want to hire you, too! The interviewer should feel assured that you would treat your team well, if placed in a leadership position.
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14.
What made you choose physical therapy over other health professions?
This question is similar to 'tell me about yourself.' This question will give you the opportunity to tell the interviewer more about why you chose to be a physical therapist. Did you decide to help people because it personally affected you as a child? Did a family member benefit from a physical therapist and you decided you wanted to help people as well?

Ryan's Answer #1
"I chose physical therapy over everything else because I feel it's important to stay healthy and keep your body healthy. I've found that as a physical therapist I have the opportunity to specialize down the road if I'd like to change it up a bit."
Ryan's Answer #2
"When I was in high school, I had a brief time where I was seeing a Physical Therapist due to a car accident I had been in where I suffered a back injury. Seeing how my therapy turned my injury around in a quick manner inspired me to want to help people in a similar predicament that I was in back then. After my schooling and internship, I am confident that I made the right career choice."
Anonymous Answer
"As a person, I have always had a passion for helping other people, and as a former athlete, I had experienced many injuries that put me in need of physiotherapy. So since the moment I got to know the positive impact that a physiotherapist can make in someone's life, I had in my mind that when I’d stop pursuing a career as an athlete, that I’d love to become a physiotherapist."
Rachelle's Answer
This answer is nice and gives the interviewer great insight into what drives you in your PT career.
"I have a passion for helping other people, and, as a former athlete, I have experienced many injuries that put me in need of physiotherapy. So, since the moment I witnessed the positive impact that a physiotherapist can make in someone's life, I had in my mind to pursue it as a career."
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15.
Are there any unique skills or techniques that you would bring to our group?
For this question, think about a unique skill that you could bring to your potential new employer that may not be visible on your resume. Hiring managers are looking to have a complete group of physical therapists that have great general skills along with each person bringing their own unique specializations to the team.

Ryan's Answer #1
"During my career, I have taken great interest in patient education and have recently completed a CME course on health coaching. Since doing so, I have been the go-to person in my clinic for assising with patient education. This is a role that I thrive in and would like to continue with it moving forward."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my pursuit of my doctorate degree, I conducted extensive research and wrote my thesis on physical therapy in the treatment of vertigo. Being personally touched by the condition, I am passionate about helping future patients with vertigo in the treatment methods that I learned."
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34 Physical Therapist Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Interview Questions
  1. Are you physically fit and do you exercise?
  2. Which population are you excited to work with?
  3. What brings stress to your world as a Physical Therapist? How do you handle stressful situations in the workplace?
  4. Describe the steps you take when reviewing a patients medication.
  5. Being with a single patient for an hour can be tiring, how can you overcome that?
  6. Tell me about a situation where you showed a great deal of patience?
  7. Talk about a recent problem that you faced as a Physical Therapist. How did you go about solving the problem?
  8. How would your co-workers describe you?
  9. What work setting do you prefer?
  10. How would you handle a situation where a patient you had been working with requested another therapist or a move to another therapy clinic?
  11. Talk about a time there was miscommunication in the treatment of a patient. How did you handle that situation?
  12. Describe your typical work week.
  13. What is your style of leadership?
  14. What made you choose physical therapy over other health professions?
  15. Are there any unique skills or techniques that you would bring to our group?
  16. What is your greatest strength as a Physical Therapist?
  17. What excites you the most about being a Physical Therapist?
  18. Are you comfortable delegating work?
  19. Have you ever been interested in treating sports injuries?
  20. What classes or professors had the most impact on you?
  21. Being a Physical Therapist allows you to see progress in your patients, does this motivate you? Why?
  22. How do you educate your patients?
  23. How would you rehabilitate or strengthen the tibialis anterior muscle?
  24. How do you keep yourself up to date in the field of Physical Therapy?
  25. In what capacity have you worked with PT Assistants? What role do you feel they play in the rehabilitation of a patient?
  26. Are you available to do outreach to other clinics or make in-home visits?
  27. How do you motivate your patients in their rehabilitation process?
  28. Talk about a time where you had to involve the family or caregivers of a patient you were working with? In what capacity did you have to involve them?
  29. How do you stay organized?
  30. Give me an example of a tough patient you had to deal with.
  31. Tell me about a time you gave excellent patient care.
  32. Discuss a patient plan that you designed and implemented.
  33. What experiences have you had that made you a better person?
  34. How would you work differently with an older patient?
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