Careers
Companies
Topics
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

HR Consultant Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by
| Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.

Question 1 of 30

When a major HR problem arises, what is your first reaction?

1000s of Interview Questions

Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.

HR Consultant Interview Questions

  1. 1.

    When a major HR problem arises, what is your first reaction?

      When things go south in the workplace, the HR professional is often the first place a company will look for answers. You have to have it under control, and be ready to step into action at any given moment. Your job is people, and people are unpredictable. The interviewer wants to know if your reactions to problems reflect maturity and professionalism. Demonstrate to the interviewer that you take a very systematic approach to problem-solving, rather than reacting impulsively when an HR related problem occurs.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "My first inclination in the event of a major problem is to roll up my sleeves and jump in to fix it or help mitigate some of the potential blow out. This initial reaction is especially true when the problem involves an employee's wellbeing, or if there is a risk of harassment or a confidentiality breach."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "When a major problem arises, my first instinct is to jump in and fix the issue. I am a do-er and also think in a reverse-engineering manner. I start with the desired result and work my way backward, figuring out where the roadblock initially occurred."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I start by asking questions as a means to slow the person down who is reporting the situation to me (they are often emotional). I am calm when I ask questions, but I respond with empathy to what I have heard, I speak slowly and tell them what I am hearing is important, and I want to get all the facts down, so I am going to take notes. If the person affected is reporting the situation to me, they often need to be taken care of before I can address the issue."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Your method comes from a place of care, empathy, compassion, and understanding. Well done.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes (1) or No (0)
      Anonymous Answer

      "I would stay calm as others in the situation may need someone who can take the lead and not 'freak out'. I would try to collect as much information as I can from the parties before responding to ensure my advice on how to proceed is found. I would consult the policies, collective agreements, and professional practice guidelines on a given job where relevant to support any advice. In cases where there may not be a clear collective agreement item or policy to help guide decision making, it is good to bring the issue to labour relations or the person responsible for HR policy in order to get their feedback on how it will impact further actions of the organization."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Your approach is thorough, and it's clear that you follow important HR policies and practices. If you have experienced a situation like this in the past, I recommend changing your wording from 'I would...'(hypothetical wording can hint that you have not experienced this situation) to 'I do...'(active wording insinuates that you have experienced this before). For example: "When a major HR problem arises, I stay calm...I collect as much information as I can...I consult the policies..."

      Was this answer helpful? Yes (1) or No (0)
  2. 2.

    Do you have experience using HR data analytics for the purpose of compensation benchmarking?

      Compensation benchmarking, or salary benchmarking, is the process of matching the pay of private jobs to similar roles from other companies. For instance, you are comparing how much your company's competitor will pay for an electrical engineer with five years' experience to ensure your company is competitive in its compensation structure.

      The practice of benchmarking ensures that you are never out of touch with your company's offering and that your company can more easily attract top talent. Also, when you accurately benchmark, you can better plan for annual employee increases. Discuss the tools that you may use in this process.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Compensation benchmarking is a critical task, ensuring that our company is competitive in their pay, allowing us to gain the best talent in the market. Luckily, our company is incredibly generous and competitive, and we pay on average 7% more than our top competitors. I gather this information from employees who have moved over and other resources such as Glassdoor and Salary.com."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I understand the concept of salary benchmarking, and I look forward to learning the tools your organization uses to collect and track this data. The practice of benchmarking is important. I can see numerous benefits to this act, including competitive hiring, better market value knowledge, and reduced talent loss due to better-paying roles with competitors. I believe that employee and candidate surveys could be a helpful way of collecting this data."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I do not have experience in compensation benchmarking specifically, but in my current role, I use Lawson heavily and have become fairly proficient with Lawson reports. I have been able to pull a lot of important data for other's use from Lawson, so I believe this is a function of reports I can definitely learn quickly if needed."

      Rachelle's Answer

      It seems you have a solid foundation in Lawson reporting, which is a valuable experience. I encourage you to remove statements such as 'I don't' and replace them with positive, actionable statements.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes (1) or No (0)
      Anonymous Answer

      "Yes, I have pulled information from my counterparts in the industry to compile compensation benchmarking. I have used data collected by third-party companies in the absence of local market intelligence to create appropriate wage rates and merit adjustments."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Very good! If possible, be more specific on the third parties that you use, in case the interviewer is familiar.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes (1) or No (0)
  3. 3.

    Do you think honesty is always the best policy?

      The interviewer would like to know if you genuinely feel that honesty is the best policy. Many will argue that honesty is not always the best policy. Some food for thought - when you are terminating an employee, do you tell them all the reasons why they are being let go, or do you see value in disclosing only what you must disclose. Talk to the interviewer about your thoughts on honesty in the workplace.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Sometimes full disclosure can damage someone's self-esteem, and reality isn't always best expressed in full and can be self-indulgent based on the person's intention. In those instances, honesty isn't always the best policy."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Honesty is always the best policy. Often, it is just a matter of how you communicate and deliver your message so managing this with each employee situation is critical to building honest and trustworthy workplace relationships."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Always. This is something my dad instilled in me my whole life, and I find it still to be the right thing to do. I do this throughout every aspect of my life - personal and professional."

      Rachelle's Answer

      A solid answer that showcases the fact that honesty and integrity are part of who you are as a person.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "I believe in almost all cases that honesty is very important to maintain the integrity of the relationship between the employees and HR. HR professionals also need to be aware of balancing honesty with confidentiality and legal concerns. However, most of the time, if you are operating ethically and within the law, then there usually should be no problem with being transparent about a process, policy or decision."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Good point regarding the balance between honesty and confidentiality and legal concerns. Your answer shows a solid understanding of your role as an HR professional.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  4. 4.

    Tell me about your exposure to team building exercises.

      If you have ever participated in a ropes course or a trust fall, then you have engaged in team building exercises! Of course, most examples of team-building do not need to be that extreme. Any activity or company effort that motivates teams and builds trust among co-workers is considered a team-building exercise.

      Many companies will offer team experiences to help build stable groups who collaborate and communicate better. If you have experience as a participant or leader, share your knowledge and be sure to highlight your biggest takeaway from experience.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I initiate a few team building events per year with my team. Sometimes it's a family potluck or picnic in a park, other times, its a group volunteer effort at the soup kitchen. We do a lot together as a group. It's important for bonding and overall employee satisfaction."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Team building activities in our office are entertaining because we have such an expressive group of people. One time, we built an entire obstacle course out of office supplies, and everyone had to participate. We had awards and prizes. I believe these small things are what makes an employee engaged in their job, even on the toughest of days."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I do not have a lot of exposure to leading team-building exercises. However, I find setting up group activities to get people to connect over more than just work can be very effective. An example is I once was in a fantasy basketball league at work; I don't even watch basketball, but we all got really into it, and it helped break down the silos between certain departments, which was important."

      Rachelle's Answer

      It sounds like this basketball league was a fun and memorable experience! Rather than beginning your answer with 'I do not...' (this makes the interviewer check out right away), I recommend leading with a positive statement. For instance, you could discuss some of the team-building exercises that you've seen to be impactful even if you did not lead them. You mentioned a 'Caregiver of the Month' program in a previous response...this could be considered team-building, perhaps since it was meant to initiate retention and motivation.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  5. 5.

    How do you ensure a professional yet fair approach to disciplinary action?

      The hiring authority is not looking for an HR Consultant who will throw the hammer down or overreact when situations arise. When it comes to disciplinary action, show the interviewer that you are capable of being diplomatic and fair while remaining effective in your role. If you have an example to give, this is a great time to discuss what you have done in the past.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "In my experience, the most effective way to approach disciplinary action is to work with the employee on a performance plan, based on the fact that they are not meeting expectations. I like to solve an issue, rather than put a band-aid on it. One time I had a sales employee who had missed their target two months in a row. Three months meant termination or employment, so it was vital that we got her back on track. We crafted a plan together, set her up with a senior salesperson for additional training and mentorship. Then, I checked in every week on her goals. She ended up being one of the top salespeople that year which was very satisfying to see."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I have a very progressive approach to disciplinary action. One example I can give you is when I am facing a poor attendance issue. I recently sat down with one employee and mapped out their days off, showing them, with actual data, where they would be in their career two years down the road if their attendance remained the same. This data showed that he was missing nearly 1/4 of time compared to other top performers in his department. I challenged him on that saying 'What could you do with your career if you fully applied yourself?' This conversation gave him his fire back."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Develop a clearly outlined policy that is progressive Provide appropriate interactive training that uses various situations and role plays Define and gain buy-in that what are considered infractions and what is considered grounds for immediate termination Ensure that the expectations of work conduct are communicated to all existing associates and new members When performance discussions occur, collaboratively create the performance improvements plan"

      Rachelle's Answer

      Your approach is very well structured and fair. Nice response.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "I would start with a more informal check-in conversation with them regarding the issue. Starting with a more collaborative approach on improving performance/workplace behaviour would usually result in the most motivation from the employee to improve. If this approach doesn't work, we would have a more formal conversation with them and the manager about improvement and explain what will be expected of them and what will happen if they do not correct their behaviour. Depending on the behaviour or consequences, it might warrant a more escalated approach, but it is important to stay calm and take the time to develop a plan with the manager to address the given situation."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Your process sounds fair and well organized. If you have a specific example of a time when you utilized this approach, it would be good to include a brief story that highlights your approach and the final result.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  6. 6.

    What type of long-term incentive programs have you leveraged to drive employee performance?

      Employee performance can be a tricky subject. A top employee can become an underperformer in a snap, and employees who are not doing well could suddenly have a stellar month. The interviewer would like to know if you have knowledge and experience with long-term incentive programs to encourage high-performance, along with consistent results, from your teams. Some examples of long-term incentive programs include stock options, cash bonuses, or performance shares.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "In my current company, we offer stock-based compensation to our sales executives, after three years of tenure. This compensation structure is a significant award to our loyal, trustworthy employees and has consistently given return value to the organization. The program launched ten years ago with incredible success. I believe this is because people love to see financial rewards while also feeling like they are a part of something big."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I have worked for a company that offered year-end cash bonus' which seemed to be a significant performance driver. Employees would often check where they were on the leaderboard, and if they were in the top 20, they knew they would receive a bonus. This cash bonus came on a scaled rewards system which made it competitive in a healthy way. I also found this was a simple way to highlight which employees were consistently underperforming, giving me the opportunity to see where performance coaching or career training could help."

  7. 7.

    What questions do you have for me?

      As you know from your experience being on the other side of the interview table, it's always a great idea to have questions ready for the interviewer. Review the company website and other online resources to ensure the queries you have are not mundane, or redundant. The last thing an interviewer wants to hear is a list of items you could have found the answers for from merely watching a video on their company site!

      Here are some sample questions:

      - When would you like to have this position filled?
      - How long has this role been vacant?
      - Is this a replacement search or a newly created role?
      - What is your favorite part about working here?
      - What is the company's primary goal for this position in the next 12 months?
      - Is there anything from my background and experience that I can clarify for you?
      - What do you see as the most significant change in this industry over the past three years?
      - Is there any reason why you would not hire me?

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Thank you for asking - I do have a few questions. What is top of mind when it comes to filling this role? Also, what types of career growth opportunities would follow this position? And lastly, do you have internal candidates who are also interviewing for this position?"

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I would like to ask if there is anything in my background on which you need clarification? Also, after discussing everything today, is there any particular reason why I would not be the best fit for this HR Consultant role? "

      Anonymous Answer

      "What kind of cross-functional teams will this person be working in? Are there any immediate future changes coming?"

      Rachelle's Answer

      Very insightful, and important questions to ask before joining any new organization.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "What is the timeline for this position to be filled? What is your feedback with regards to my candidacy for this position? What do you see as the most significant change for your company in the next 6 - 12 months? What do you enjoy most about working here? Is there any reason you would not hire me?"

      Rachelle's Answer

      These are all excellent questions and will allow you to overcome any objections or questions the interviewer may have immediately.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  8. 8.

    Think about a demanding boss, professor or coworker. How did you successfully interact with this person?

      As an HR professional, one of your most significant traits should be your ability to be diplomatic in the workplace. The interviewer wants to know how you interact with people who may have challenging personalities. Think about that one person at work who is seen as hard to please. Perhaps there is someone at work who tries to intimidate others. Show the interviewer that you work well with most personalities even though you recognize some people are quite difficult to please. Avoid speaking poorly of anyone, and be sure to end your response on a positive note.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I once worked for an executive who was very difficult in meetings and with interacting with groups of others. I took it upon myself to help this person interact better with others. When she would bark orders, I would reiterate what she was trying to say to the group more professionally. It took some time, but she learned to behave in a way that made people want to work with her."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "The most difficult person I ever worked with was my boss a few years back. She received a promotion to VP of Human Resources, from the position I had been hired to fill and was unwilling to listen to my ideas to change the department. I believe she felt personally offended that I did not think her processes were the most efficient, but it was not personal. I sat with her for a one on one meeting when there were very few people in the building, and we had a nice chat about the positive changes she made to the department and my ideas to continue to grow what she began."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I had a boss who wanted to be kept abreast of all things at all times. On occasion, this was not feasible, as it kept me from being able to do my job. So we met, and we walked through examples of information she needed to looped in on daily and others that she could be updated on weekly. I also reiterated what I needed for success and asked her if this was feasible. We came to an agreement, and things worked from there."

      Rachelle's Answer

      This must have been a challenging conversation with someone so hyper-focused on being in-the-know. It sounds as though you handled this very well, and it's great that you included the positive result.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  9. 9.

    Do you have experience in mass-layoffs or terminations? What is your view on job eliminations?

      Most HR professionals will agree that is 100% sucks to have to terminate people. Now, in mass amounts - it's even worse. However, this is a reality that you may need to face in your human resources career at some point.

      Discuss with the interviewer a time when you have had to take part in, or even lead job eliminations. Walk the hiring authority through the steps that you made. If you do not have experience with job eliminations, discuss the approach you believe you would take in such a situation. If you have the rapport with the interviewer, you may want to ask if a mass-layoff is something this company has ever experienced or is currently facing.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Job eliminations are never fun, especially regarding mass-layoffs. About ten years ago I worked for a telecommunications company that needed to lay off about 40% of its workforce. We held one-on-one meetings, and the process felt organized. We softened the blow as much as possible, offering ample severance pay and outplacement services for those losing their jobs. These factors made the task easier, but it was still a challenging circumstance. Has your organization faced the task of mass layoffs in the past?"

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Mass layoffs are new to me; however, I have led terminations in the past; approximately 20 in total. When I am having the termination conversation, I am sure to have my conversation well documented, and a clear approach set out, so the conversation remains on point. I share details of the 'why,' and am sure to provide resources and support post-termination."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I have not had to terminate people in any of my roles aside from terminating people who have abandoned their positions. However, I also went through a large layoff at my previous company, where about a quarter of the office was let go. I didn't handle it directly, but I helped gather their personal effects to assist and informed our team of those who had departed in my manager's absence. When it comes to having difficult conversations, I have had to speak with people about improving their performance at different stages of their time with us."

      Rachelle's Answer

      It sounds like you bring a strong variety of experiences related to job separations. Rather than saying, 'I have not' and 'I didn't,' I recommend focusing more on your transferable experiences. I've provided an example for you below.

      "I assisted with a large layoff at my previous company where about a quarter of the office was let go. My involvement included gathering the personal effects of those laid off. I also assisted my manager, who was absent, by informing the remainder of our team members of those who had departed. I also have experience terminating people who have abandoned their positions. When it comes to difficult conversations, I have had to speak with employees about improving their work performance."

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  10. 10.

    In your opinion, what are the core competencies of organizational effectiveness?

      The interviewer is asking what you believe to be the makeup of an effective organization. Your response will require insight. Draw upon what you have seen in your HR career regarding companies that have been highly successful and those that have not. Discuss which core competencies divide the successful organizations from those that fall flat.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "From my experience in HR, and working for successful companies in the past, the core areas of focus should be to excel in areas of employee compensation, labor relations, continuous professional development opportunities, employee safety, and systems streamlining. There are other important sub-topics within those, but these are the core competencies for organizational effectiveness, in my opinion."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "For an organization to have advantages over its competitors, it often comes down to attracting the best talent in multiple departments. A company needs to be hyper-focused on hot employee topics such as attracting and keeping millennial employees, offering professional development opportunities and regular training, as well as having a stand-out diversity and inclusion program."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Inspire and motivate others to do their best Select the best Talent at the Right Time for the Right Job Provide support to managers (so that they can empower and lead, remove obstacles so they can do their jobs) Provide training and development to your leadership team Partner within and across teams (departmental and intradepartmental) Provide support without removing responsibility (promote accountability) Communicate"

      Rachelle's Answer

      Excellent and very full answer! These are all incredibly important competencies.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  11. 11.

    Do you possess the knowledge and awareness required to communicate in a multicultural workplace?

      The interviewer wants to know more about your exposure to diversity, and a multicultural workplace. If you have ever taken part in developing a workplace culture surrounding intercultural engagement, this is the time to discuss that experience. Show that you have a full understanding of the term 'cultural diversity' and that you are sensitive to the belief systems, values, and identity of those who are different from you.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I have a great deal of exposure and experience when it comes to identifying various dimensions of differences, and the significant consequences that come to organizations who do not embrace those differences. Whether it be altering my communication style, or creating educational workplace programs which address discrimination, prejudice, and ethnocentrism; I am an active advocate and ally to all employees regardless of their background, lifestyle, or beliefs."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I believe that my university education and years of experience working in a variety of industries have helped me to form excellent skills when it comes to communicating with those different from me. Whether those differences come from a language or cultural divide, a person's core identity, or their belief systems, I am highly aware of best practices for sensitivity in the workplace when it comes to communication and more."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Yes, I have completed cultural diversity management studies and inclusion programs."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Straightforward and to the point. You sound very confident in this area.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  12. 12.

    Do you feel employees should be paid based on performance, or should they be rewarded for years of experience?

      The interviewer would like to know your thoughts on paying employees based on work performance, versus compensating them based on years of experience and loyalty. As millennial employees continue to dominate the work scene, more and more employees are requesting compensation based on delivered results. The interviewer wants to know if you feel that employees should be paid based on tenure, or results. Discuss this with the interviewer and back your answer with an example, if possible.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I feel that employees should be paid, and rewarded, based on their performance. A new employee will find motivation in being rewarded for performance, and it encourages a healthy competition with tenured employees. I have seen this to be true on many occasions in my HR career."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "As an HR Consultant, I feel that both performance and experience should be weighted when deciding compensation, pay increases, and promotions. You want to ensure that you compensate your highest performers appropriately but that their growth is stable and manageable in the long-term."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I believe they should be paid for performance. I think this drives the right behaviors to move the business forward. I don't think seniority translates to performance. I do believe seniority should be taken into a factor for some things, like job bidding."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Perfect response, and you make a great case for where seniority should be considered but also how it should not trump a high-performing employee.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "A starting salary should be a reflection on what I bring to this role, which is a combination of experience, skills, and knowledge. In terms of bonuses or incentives, this should be paid only if certain job-specific metrics are achieved that are within the control of this position."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Well said! This is a very fair compensation structure.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  13. 13.

    Have you ever led performance reviews or employee coaching sessions?

      If you are newer to your HR career, you may not have a lot of exposure to employee coaching and performance meetings. Regardless of your level of exposure to these tasks, the interviewer is looking for further knowledge of your leadership experience. Speak about your experience with coaching and motivating those on your team. If you have recently read a book on performance coaching, you could discuss it and how it has helped you.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "In my current role, I have a significant part in performance reviews for our team of 35 individuals. The executive team is also involved in these reviews, so although I am not the lead, I play an important role. I am a good coach as I love to inspire and motivate others to do their best in all aspects of their lives. I would say that I have led about 200 coaching sessions in total, throughout my HR career."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I look forward to the opportunity to lead performance reviews and coaching sessions. I believe this is an incredible leadership skill and I look forward to implementing my knowledge and helping others to succeed in the workplace. I recently read 'Leaders Eat Last' by Simon Sinek, which taught me a great deal about overcoming traditional assumptions on how great leaders effectively guide their teams. This book gave me a few excellent ideas on how to approach employee coaching, once presented with the opportunity."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I have led two full cycle performance reviews. This included the beginning of the process with re-launching SMART goals for KPI's. In my current role, I am completing coaching sessions almost daily. A coaching session I had yesterday was with a Zone Leader on the perception of his leadership style not feeling collaborative, and we brainstormed together on ways to be more inclusive with his team in conversation."

      Rachelle's Answer

      You do a great job showcasing your high-level coaching sessions. Your approach sounds structured and very clear.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes (1) or No (0)
      Anonymous Answer

      "I've had some training and performance coaching of new Recruiting interns coming in at my previous job. Additionally, it was part of my role as an HR Specialist for a few months to coach employees on performance issues such as poor attendance, use of PPE and proper protocol, and discussing complaints from clients."

      Rachelle's Answer

      It sounds like you have a great deal of experience in these areas, which is great! At the end of your answer, I recommend discussing how your experiences will ensure success in this new position. Take some time to talk about the coaching/mentoring responsibilities in this new role and show that you are confident in meeting these needs.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  14. 14.

    What type of employees do you find most challenging?

      An HR Consultant will encounter every possible personality type in their career! The interviewer would like to know more about the kinds of employees that you find difficult to manage, and how you handle them. As an HR professional, you will be required to collaborate successfully with a great variety of personality types. Discuss with the interviewer the types of personalities that you find most challenging to manage, and why.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Every employee brings their challenges and strengths to teams. It is difficult to influence associates who are disinterested or resistant to engagement with the team. Luckily I do not encounter this often. The people who I have led are motivated and hardworking, each in their unique way."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I feel as though I can adapt to most employees, but what challenges me is someone who is just looking to skate by with no real ambition. I do my best to find ways to motivate any and every employee. Even if they are not vying for the next promotion or to be the top person in their department, I feel there is some encouragement I can offer, whether it's discussing a potential growth opportunity, a different department, or what have you. This approach works about 80% of the time for unmotivated employees."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I find negative employees to be challenging. I try to find the root cause of their negativity and do everything I can to change it, but sometimes I have to be overly positive if it's just the mood they are in."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Smile through the pain, haha makes sense, and we all have to do it sometimes :) It may be a nice addition to tell a quick story about a time when you coached a negative employee, and they made a great turnaround.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "This is a great question. I would say the two most challenging types have been the conspiracy theorist and the other more mature individual where English is their second or third language, and they refuse a translator. For both types, active listening was key, along with patience and empathy. I adapted a very calm and soothing voice, closer body language, direct eye contact, and if it were highly emotional, I would ask what they needed at the time to feel heard."

      Rachelle's Answer

      These are challenging types, indeed, and it seems you handle these situations with the utmost professionalism. Very good answer!

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  15. 15.

    Tell me one valuable skill that you are currently working on.

      The interviewer wants to see your dedication to professional growth. When you are all about professional development, chances are you will pass that excitement onto the employees that you influence, as an HR Consultant. Give an example of a skill that you wish to develop. Bonus points if you can tie that skill in with a talent mentioned in the job posting!

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I am working on my assertiveness. Sometimes I have a great idea, and I fumble in asserting myself, and I believe that the team would be much better off if I were to have lobbied for my idea. Or sometimes I am too understanding to last-minute scheduling requests which results in an employee shirking their responsibility and others having to pick up the slack. I know that this is a weakness of mine and I have made it a point to work on it, including reading 'Nice Girls Never Get the Corner Office.'"

      Rachelle's Answer

      "This year I have been diligently working on my ability to create curriculum and new training programs for new hires. I hope to have my first course launched in the next month, or so, however, I still have some technical writing courses to complete before I know it will be perfect execution. I believe these resources will be beneficial to your organization and I look forward to sending them your way for review."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I am currently on my project leadership. I was recently named project leader for an A3 on overtime reduction. This is my first A3, where I am the leader, so I am excited to work with my team and the resources I have to lower overtime in our business successfully."

      Rachelle's Answer

      This must be a very exciting opportunity for you! Did you do something over and above or extraordinary to be named project leader? If so, it would be great to include a bit about how you earned the opportunity.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "I have been spending time working more on my written communications skills. I believe this skill will become more important in future HR roles as we will rely more on email for communication. In further roles, I will need to talk about more complex issues requiring more tact and clarity, and having practice now would avoid a lot of issues in the future."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Written communication skills are important, yes. When you say, 'I believe this skill will become more important in future HR roles as we will rely more on email for communication...' be sure to finish the thought by adding in the WHY (Is this because of COVID and more remote work hours?). Next, be sure to include details around the actions you are taking to improve. Saying you spend time on this is okay, but it's much more memorable/engaging when you give details on what you are doing to improve.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  16. 16.

    In which HR software tools are you best versed?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  17. 17.

    How do you develop trust among your team in a virtual, or work-from-home, setting?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  18. 18.

    Are you familiar with the term 'outplacement'? Have you ever utilized outplacement services?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  19. 19.

    What do you believe to be the most prominent human resource trend of the year? Have you yet embraced it?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  20. 20.

    Have you ever had a particular circumstance where you needed to deviate from HR policy? How did you approach the dilemma?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  21. 21.

    Discuss a time when you explored organizational gaps and created new opportunities for employees.

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  22. 22.

    What is your perspective on work-life integration?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  23. 23.

    Hiring smart is the key to an organizations' success. What interview techniques do you lean on to ensure effective new hires?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  24. 24.

    Your role will often require you to inspire excellence in others. What does greatness mean to you?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  25. 25.

    Have you ever led a workplace investigation related to discrimination, bullying, or sexual harassment?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  26. 26.

    How do you keep up with changes in legislature and human resource law?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  27. 27.

    Tell me about the most significant people issue you have encountered in your HR career.

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  28. 28.

    Which workplace culture development strategies have you explored?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  29. 29.

    Tell me your most proven strategy for motivating under-performing employees.

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  30. 30.

    How would you uncover the core competencies of a candidate?

      View All 30 HR Consultant Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.