Careers
Companies
Topics
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Property Manager Interview
Questions

43 Questions and Answers by Ryan Brown

Question 1 of 43

Tell me about a time when you experienced a major change to your normal work practices. How did you handle it?

1000s of Interview Questions

Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.

Property Manager Interview Questions

  1. 1.

    Tell me about a time when you experienced a major change to your normal work practices. How did you handle it?

      Changes in the workplace happen all the time! The key here is sharing that you are supportive of change and happily adapt to the changes. Think back to a major change that you happily welcomed in the past two years. Describe the change to the interviewer, outlining the previous process, the requested change, and your reaction to the change. Next, share that you recognized why the company was making this change, and tell the interviewer that you were excited about the change and welcomed it openly.

      Ryan's Answer

      "I think most people would find major changes to routine procedures they conduct on a daily basis to be somewhat annoying. To be completely honest, I'd initially be a little bit annoyed, like most people. But then, I remind myself that these decisions are made in what upper management believes to be best for the company. And since I'm a team player, and I recognize that the company's best interests are also my own best interests, I just look for ways to learn the new procedures as quickly as I can. The change is going to happen anyway, so I may as well make the transition as smooth as possible.
      Last year, the management at my previous company decided to upgrade the system tenants used to report maintenance issues. The current system was easy to navigate, and I had a lot of information saved on that system from previous situations I had dealt with. Ultimately, I knew the upgraded system would provide a better, more timely service for the tenants, so I quickly adjusted to the new system and even committed to training other employees on how to manage work orders that came through."

      Ryan's Answer

      "I think most people would find major changes to routine procedures that they conduct on a daily basis to be somewhat annoying. To be completely honest, I'd initially be a little bit annoyed like most people. But then I just remind myself that these decisions are made in what upper management believes to be best for the company. And since I'm a team player, and I recognize that the company's best interests are also my own best interests, I just look for ways to learn the new procedures as quickly as I can. The change is going to happen anyway, so I may as well make the transition as smooth as possible."

  2. 2.

    Tell me about your greatest strength or skill that makes you a great property manager?

      Talking about ourselves in this way can be challenging. We recommend reaching out to a few colleagues, family members, and friends. Ask them for their opinion. You'll probably be surprised at the consistency in their responses! Their answers will give you insight into how to answer this question. Tell the interviewer what sets you apart, and explain how your co-workers, family members, and friends have encouraged you with your gift in this area.

      Ryan's Answer

      "My greatest strength in my work is probably my ability to listen. I listen closely to try to understand people's needs and I do my best to meet them. My ability to listen and understand helps me to build strong relationships with people and this allows others come to trust me. I also listen closely whenever I have the opportunity to learn, whether it be from a continuing education course, a colleague, a tenant, or a book I'm reading. I consider myself a lifelong learner and always do what I can to perform at my very best."

  3. 3.

    Tell me about a time when you were particularly effective in prioritizing tasks and completing a project on schedule.

      In response to this question, think about a project you completed or led that was a success. Reflect on exactly what it was that made the project go so well. Maybe it was your ability to plan ahead to have all of the materials in advance, or your ability to set aside everything else for a short period of time to get the project done. Maybe it was your ability to prepare a set of detailed step-by-step plans to ensure you knew exactly when your deadlines were. Tell the interviewer what project you were working on, as well as your role with the project. Next, share the outcome of the project, and express why the project went so well, focusing on how your effective planning and organization skills allowed you to achieve success.

      Ryan's Answer

      "In my previous role, the owner of the commercial property I managed wanted to give the shopping center a facelift. They wanted to completely renovate all storefronts and signage to make the building appear more modern. I knew this project would take careful planning, with all of the contractors and workers to coordinate and manage. I assembled a trusted team including an architect, a designer, a structural engineer, and a construction crew. During the course of this project, I set deadlines and held all parties accountable for their work. I communicated regularly with tenants and with the owners so there were no surprises or unexpected issues. I spearheaded the project and received great feedback that it was well organized and everything was communicated very clearly. I am still very proud of taking on this project and seeing it through to completion, on schedule and under budget."

  4. 4.

    Why are you looking for a new job?

      Be candid with the interviewer and share why you are pursuing other companies. Do your best to only talk about your previous employer in a positive manner, and focus on how you would like to better yourself with a new opportunity! If you are not a fan of your current manager, simply tell the interviewer that you are hoping to find a manager who can mentor you and help you grow as a property manager. If you dislike your current working hours, tell the interviewer that you are seeking a work schedule that allows you to have more time with your friends and family. Translate your reason for leaving into how you will benefit from the transition!

      Ryan's Answer

      "I've really enjoyed working for my previous company, but I am ready to move on and take on more responsibility. I want to develop professionally and advance my career. I am hopeful to work under someone who can mentor me and share different perspectives of the industry. I have also previously managed small commercial properties, and I'm hoping to take on larger properties with more potential to attract and sign tenants. I am very excited about this new opportunity."

  5. 5.

    Describe a scenario where you had to balance competing customer demands with project constraints. How did you ensure customer satisfaction while maintaining the goals of the project?

      Think about the constraints you have encountered with projects. Weather, contractor availability, employee availability, city regulations (permits/zoning permits/inspections/environmental compliance), and budget are all possible constraints you may have encountered. Next, think about how these constraints affected your customers. Consider the feedback you received, questions customers were asking, and fears about not being able to provide customers with what they want. Providing examples of similar things will make for a solid response to this question. Start by telling the interviewer what project you were working on, the constraint you had, and the customer demand that you were competing with. Next, share what steps you took to ensure customer satisfaction during this time.
      In a rental industry, perhaps you focused on the customer relationship by offering guests at your property a free nights stay. If your restaurant was shut down, maybe you set up a discount with another local establishment for your guests. In a corporate or commercial property management setting, perhaps you acted as an advocate for tenants encouraging the city to keep the process for inspections on schedule. Maybe you opened the door for the city representatives to meet with tenants to allow them to have all of their questions answered about regulations before the project began. It's all about maintaining the positive customer relationship, so whatever action you took in your industry, explain the positive outcome your efforts had!

      Ryan's Answer

      "In my previous role, the owner of the commercial property I managed wanted to give the shopping center a facelift. They wanted to completely renovate all storefronts and signage to make the building appear more modern. I was nervous to present this to the tenants, as there would be a few days throughout the course of the project that construction would be completely blocking the entrances to their storefronts. In order to soften the blow and make up for a potential loss in revenue on those few days of construction, I spoke with the owner about a 5% rent reduction that month. The owner agreed and the news went over well with the tenants. I was able to communicate information about the project well ahead of time and the rent reduction helped the tenants agree to the renovations. In the end, everything went off without a hitch!"

  6. 6.

    How would you handle a situation in which the direction from above was unclear and circumstances were changing?

      Interviewers like hearing that you are willing to accept change with a positive attitude, and you will happily work through any challenges that come with change. Tell the interviewer that you understand change happens in companies, and you realize it is your responsibility to ensure you have clarity about the changes and implement them professionally. State that you would reach out to your manager to gain clarity on the direction you are supposed to take to ensure you are proceeding in the manner the leadership team intended. As a bonus, share that you understand the leadership team has good intentions with the changes, and you just want to ensure you are supporting the changes properly.

      Ryan's Answer

      "Change is inevitable, although it is often accompanied by growing pains and learning curves. If I was unclear as to a new process or any change implemented by management, I would be sure to reach out directly to manager to gain clarity. I would be sure to approach them with a list of questions, so that I could gain a better understanding of the change and how it directly affects me and my role. I understand that leadership teams make decisions, as they see fit, in order to benefit the company in the long run. I am able to quickly adjust and adapt to change and am comfortable asking for help, if need be."

  7. 7.

    Rate your management skills on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 representing excellent management skills. Provide three examples from your past work experiences that support your reasoning.

      If you are after a managerial position, chances are you already have experiencing being a great manager or you have some ideas as to what makes a great manager, but there is always room to learn and improve! If you have management experience, share what makes you an excellent manager. If you don't, share what you have learned and appreciated from former managers. After rating yourself, be sure to tell the interviewer that there is always room to grow and improve. Next, share your three examples. Pick three examples that show positive instances of great management. Some examples include a positive conversation you recently had with an employee, a recent innovative idea you implemented, a great ways to motivate your staff, etc.

      Ryan's Answer

      "I would rate myself at an 8 out of 10. Management ability is based on leadership and organizational skills and I have developed in both of these areas over the course of my career.
      The ability to leading others effectively is very important. I had an employee who was very upset and told me that she was going to quit the job. I talked to her for several hours to figure out what was going on in her life and determined what she wasn't getting out of the job. After our talk, she came back to work on Monday, thanked me, and told me that having me as a manager was truly a blessing. It was one of the most rewarding moments in my career.
      Then there's a desire for continuous improvement. In my last management position, I saw many opportunities to improve the way things were being done, so I continually made small changes. For instance, the signs that we were posting were not very clear or visible, so I changed them. I also improved the efficiency of upkeep and the response time of repairs, which resulted in much happier tenants. I seek regularly feedback from employees to improve processes and systems.
      Finally, the ability to lead well and make positive changes requires organizational skills. In my most recent management position, I created more structure for employees, so they can rely on a regularly schedule. For example, I organized a weekly recurring meeting on Monday afternoons and biannual review and feedback conferences. This structure allows employees to stay informed, be held accountable, and have a voice.
      As you can see, I can retain and motivate employees to do a good job, and I can lead them to implement changes that result in an improved reputation for the building, which leads to higher value and increased rent."

      Ryan's Answer

      "I would rate myself at an 8 out of 10. Management ability is based on leadership and organizational skills.

      Leading others is very important. I had an employee who was very upset and told me that she was going to quit the job. I talked to her for several hours to figure out what's going on in her life and what she isn't getting out of the job. After our talk, she came back to work on Monday and thanked me, telling me that having me as a manager was truly a blessing. It was one of the most rewarding moments in my career.

      Then there's continuous improvement. In my last management position, I saw many opportunities to improve the way things were being done at that moment, so I continually made small changes. For instance, the signs that we were posting were not very clear or visible, so I changed it. I also improved the efficiency of upkeep and the response time of repairs, which resulted in much happier tenants.

      As you can see, I can retain and motivate employees to do a good job, and I can lead them to implement improvements that result in an improved reputation for the building, which leads to higher value and increased rent."

  8. 8.

    What action would you take if you joined the company?

      Interviewers have a fear of hiring a manager who is going to come in and change everything right away. They want to hear that you will improve their company without completely rocking the boat. Tell the interviewer that you would begin by simply observing until you gained a good understanding of how the company operates, what is currently working well, and what is not working so well. Next, share that you would make any urgent changes that you identify right away, and you would wait until you had a solid understanding of the company needs before making any additional changes.

      Ryan's Answer

      "The first thing I need to accomplish as a manager is understanding how the company works. I need to observe the way things are set up, listen to employees who know the processes, and get a feel for day-to-day operations. Once I understand that, I need to learn the needs of the company: are we attracting the right tenants? Are we attracting enough of them? Then I'd develop a plan to make the right improvements, with an eye for continuous and incremental improvements."

      Ryan's Answer

      "The first thing I need to accomplish as a manager is to understand how the company works. I need to observe the way things are set up. Once I understand that, I need to learn the needs of the company: are we attracting the right tenants? Are we attracting enough of them? Then I'd develop a plan to make the right improvements, with an eye for continuous and incremental improvements."

  9. 9.

    Tell me about a time when you had to deal with conflict on the job.

      Think about the last time you experienced conflict at work. Maybe your neighbors disliked that your snow removal person dropped a pile of snow in their parking lot or you had a tenant who was upset about something. Or, maybe you had a manager who didn't like the new lights you installed in the entryway. The key to this question is showing the interviewer that you worked through the problem without losing your professionalism or positive attitude. Begin by providing the interviewer with a summary of the conflict, expressing how you learned about the problem. Next, share that you apologized for the issue, and discuss how you resolved the conflict. Be sure to mention how happy the other person was when all was said and done!

      Ryan's Answer

      "The latest conflict I've had to deal with at work was between two tenants in a commercial building. Their spaces were right next to each other in the building and one complained to me that the other always had his radio on too loud. Apparently, the one tenant had already gone directly to the other and asked him to turn down his radio, as it was noisy and distracting to her and her employees. The other tenant agreed to her request, but the tenant was still unhappy with the noise level. I headed over to the building soon after to see if I could hear the music from the hallway. I could barely hear the music, but I still politely asked the tenant to keep the volume of his radio at an appropriate level. Days later, I got another call from the tenant complaining about the radio. I drove over to the building and stood in her space to listen. Come to find out, it was not his radio that she was hearing, but a loud piece of equipment he had in his space and used regularly. To ease the tension and work out the conflict, I recommended that the tenant move this large piece of equipment into a vacant space down the hall to keep the noise level to a minimum. The tenant agreed to it and both tenants left that meeting feeling heard."

  10. 10.

    What process have you used to screen potential tenants in the past? Walk me through the process.

      When screening potential tenants, regardless of the property type, describe your process. Be sure to demonstrate your organization and efficiency as you explain your process. Consider how you've gone about reviewing applications, if you have collected and checked references, completed background or credit checks, and/or verified employment to find quality tenants. Simply share which of these things you have utilized.

      Ryan's Answer

      "I follow standard industry practice, such as verifying employment, background and credit checks, and references.
      I take it one step further though. I take the time to really get to know the tenant. I really consider their likes, dislikes, and lifestyle. I need to try to predict what their complaints might be and whether they'll be a high or low maintenance tenant. I document and file each step of the process to keep current records."

      Ryan's Answer

      "I follow standard industry practice, such as verifying employment, background and credit checks, and references.

      I take it one step further though. I take the time to really get to know the tenant. What are his or her likes and dislikes, what's her lifestyle like? I need to know what his complaints might be, and whether they'll be a high or low maintenance tenant."

  11. 11.

    If I were to interview the people who have reported to you in the past, how would they describe your management style?

      Think about previous roles you've held, and consider if the people who reported to you had ever thanked you or complimented you for something. Any kind of positive feedback you can remember from a coworker under you would make for a great examples for this question. Tell the interviewer two or three things that your direct reports have thanked you for or given you positive recognition for. When in doubt, think back to your past performance reviews. Share the positive feedback you received about your leadership style. Be sure to tell the interviewer that your direct reports or past managers have told you they liked these things about you and your leadership; it will surely impress!

      Ryan's Answer

      "My direct reports would tell you that I'm a very positive and encouraging leader who knows how to keep them motivated. I insist on building positive relationships with people I'm responsible for. I do this by showing them respect and acknowledging and rewarding the good work they do. In a previous role, after holding a mid-year review with a team member, she mentioned to me that she appreciated how approachable I was and that my openness to feedback made her feel comfortable to share ideas that may improve our systems.
      On the other hand, if they're not performing to standards, I make sure they know what the standards are, and I help them improve to meet those standards."

      Ryan's Answer

      "My direct reports would tell you that I'm a very positive and encouraging leader who knows how to keep them motivated. I insist on building good relationships with the people who I'm responsible for. I do that by showing them respect and acknowledging and rewarding the good work that they do. On the same token, if they're not performing to standards, I make sure that they know what the standards are and I help them improve to meet those standards."

      Anonymous Answer

      "In terms of what makes me unique, I go out of my way to make sure the needs of the property are met. That means follow up with board members, supers, and shareholders."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Good start! Can you further describe how this approach will set you apart from other candidates? Perhaps a story example of your property management style in action :)

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  12. 12.

    Describe a time when you had to balance quality management with a challenging project schedule.

      Interviewers like hearing that you have thought ahead before diving into your project workload to ensure quality is thought about from the get-go. Think about a time when you had a hectic project schedule and you chose to build quality into the process before you ever started the project. You might have ensured you selected the appropriate personnel/contractors/team members. You may have built in essential project communication. You likely created in-depth project plans with deadlines for each part of your project schedule. Begin by telling the interviewer a little about your project schedule. Next, share that you recognized the complexity of this schedule right away, and share what steps you took to build quality into the schedule before moving forward. Explain that thinking ahead and building in quality measures early on allowed you to focus on the project schedule without having to worry about quality being compromised.

      Ryan's Answer

      "In my previous role, I built great relationships with trusted contractors and service providers I knew I could count on. I knew they would be direct, honest, and straightforward with me, regardless of the task or project at hand. It took awhile to find contractors and service providers I could always call on for help, but it makes a world of difference to have people in your corner who are trustworthy, dependable, and care about quality. This became very clear to me when I took on managing the project of renovating the storefronts of the shopping center I managed. Because I had built a relationship with the contractors and service providers I was working with over many years, they were able to provide me with honest quotes, design advice, and brought up potential road blocks. Investing in quality, mutually beneficial relationships over the years really saved the owners of the building money in the long run and helped the project run smoothly."

  13. 13.

    What is the salary that you expect?

      We all have different financial situations, and that is okay. If there is a specific dollar amount that you need to make, share that with the interviewer, but understand that you might eliminate yourself from the candidate pool if the amount you require is higher than they can offer you. It's better to find this out sooner rather than later!
      If you do not have a specific dollar amount that you need, tell the interviewer that you would like to receive an offer that is equitable for the amount of experience and qualifications that you offer. This leaves the table open for negotiations, come job offer time!

      Ryan's Answer

      "I have faith that your company will extend an offer that's an accurate reflection of how much value I bring to your organization."

      Ryan's Answer

      "I have faith that your company will extend an offer that's an accurate reflection of how much value I bring to your organization."

  14. 14.

    What factors are crucial within an organization and must be present for you to work most effectively?

      Consider previous roles and what you've appreciated most about the environment, leadership, values, and growth/development. Think about things that are crucial for you to remain loyal, motivated, work hard, want to contribute, develop as a leader, continue learning, etc. Some common responses might include an ethical leadership team, trust, being a part of something bigger than yourself, making an impact, a sense of having more than a job, the employee benefits package, positive professional relationships, stability, opportunities for engagement and growth, being able to be involved, etc.
      Simply share what things are very important to you, and your passion will automatically come through!

      Ryan's Answer

      "Trust is absolutely important to me. I need my superiors to trust me to deliver the results they want. I also value positive relationships at work. Teamwork is very important to me and I hope to work with people who are committed to serving others and working together towards a common goal. Opportunities for growth and continued development are also things that keep me motivated to always be improving."

      Ryan's Answer

      "Trust is absolutely important to me. I need my superiors to trust me to deliver the results that they want. If they don't trust me, then they'll end up getting in the way of daily operations, which jeopardizes my ability to deliver the results they're asking for."

  15. 15.

    How have you improved as a property manager over the years?

      Interviewers don't expect us to be perfect! Instead, they want to hear how we have grown from our experiences. Think about key lessons you have learned during your career. Think about how you have changed your approach as a property manager over time. These make great examples for this question. Share two or three ways you have improved as a property manager during your career, and be sure to mention that there is always more learning to do!

      Ryan's Answer

      "I have definitely come a long way since the early days of my career. These days, I am much more focused on finding the right tenant for each space. I am less concerned about simply filling the space and more concerned about the long term. For commercial spaces, I consider how the potential business might fit in with businesses in the area and whether my space is a good fit for it. My job is much less stressful when there is less turnover. Because of my established relationships with contractors and service providers, I am much more efficient in hiring people and solving problems. I've learned who I can trust and to spend money on quality over quantity. I'm always looking to work smarter, fine tune my strategy and processes, and learn more about property management."

  16. 16.

    Describe how you would motivate a group of people to do something they did not want to do.

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  17. 17.

    We currently have 10 percent vacancy. How will you try to fill those spots?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  18. 18.

    When have you had contractor disputes? How do you handle them?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  19. 19.

    When you believe an unethical issue is occurring, how do you react?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  20. 20.

    Describe to me the last property you managed. What did you find to be successful during that time, and what could have been done better?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  21. 21.

    Has there been an occasion when you refused to bow to a customer's pressure to 'bend the rules'?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  22. 22.

    What was the most challenging space you've had to lease in the past? What made it a challenge?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  23. 23.

    What is the most challenging aspect of being a manager?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  24. 24.

    What methods have you found successful in determining the priorities when you start in a new facility?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  25. 25.

    What is your definition of empowerment?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  26. 26.

    Describe a recent project where you were responsible for managing multiple people or teams. What were some of the key challenges and how did you handle those challenges?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  27. 27.

    Describe the work environment or culture and the management style in which you have experienced the most success.

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  28. 28.

    What do you know about our organization?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  29. 29.

    Tell me about a time when you influenced the outcome of a project by taking a leadership role.

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  30. 30.

    Tell us about an innovative idea or change that you implemented. Was it successful? Why or why not?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  31. 31.

    Describe a time when you implemented a new idea without being asked or pursued a new opportunity that could improve the building.

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  32. 32.

    How do you perform when others need your guidance in a building crisis?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  33. 33.

    What is the largest building or space that you have managed?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  34. 34.

    Describe a situation when you were able to have a positive influence on the actions of others.

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  35. 35.

    Have you ever discontinued service with a vendor or contractor? How did it go?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  36. 36.

    How long would it take you to make a meaningful contribution to our property?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  37. 37.

    What job duties would you like to avoid, if at all possible?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  38. 38.

    What do you do when priorities change quickly? Provide an example of a time to had to respond to change.

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  39. 39.

    How do you reward employees?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  40. 40.

    What experience do you have handling tenants?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  41. 41.

    What is your definition of Quality Assurance (QA), and who should be responsible for QA?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  42. 42.

    Why do you want to become property manager of this building?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  43. 43.

    What sort of marketing objectives did your past property employ? Which marketing initiatives did you create and start? Were they successful?

      View All 43 Property Manager Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.