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Parole Officer Interview
Questions

33 Questions and Answers by Ryan Brown
Updated August 30th, 2018
Job Interviews     Careers     Protective Services    

Question 1 of 33

In what areas do you typically have the least amount of patience at work?

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Answer Examples

1.

In what areas do you typically have the least amount of patience at work?

The interviewer wants to learn more about what motivates you and what creates barriers for you at work. Think of an area where you struggle with patience that is not a key responsibility of the role. A great answer would be saying that you have no patience for co-workers who are unethical, and you will report them immediately. This shows the interviewer that you care about the workplace environment and that you care about creating an ethical hospitable environment for everyone to work in.

Ryan's Answer

"In our line of work, patience is a must. It takes a lot to break my patience, but I do not have the patience for giving up. Quitting is too easy and I work with people to put in the hard work to overcome challenges."

2.

What kind of preparation did you do for this interview?

Be honest! Share that you practiced answering sample interview questions, read the company website, and reviewed the job description again before arriving. If you researched the agency on LinkedIn or other social media websites, be sure to mention this as well.

Ryan's Answer

"I have been very excited about this meeting as your organization is the leader in this community. I do my research and I read a lot about your organization, the mission it carries out and the people it serves, in preparation for this interview. I like how you take an approach to utilize social media, despite the industry, to educate the public about criminal statistics and mental health."

3.

What skills do you have that will benefit our agency?

The interviewer is hoping to hear that you have skills that align with the job description. Take a look at the job description. What skills are listed in the description? Pick 3-5 skills that are listed in the description that you are good at and simply list them for the interviewer.

4.

What was the most valuable thing you learned in your internship?

What is the one thing you learned during your internship that left you with a feeling of conviction? What was the one thing that really surprised you, moved you, or made you thankful you were entering this field? Now is the time to share it! Be sure to explain why you feel this was the most valuable thing you learned.

Ryan's Answer

"My internship experience taught me how to work as a team member, share knowledge and skills, accept, adapt, offer and respond to coaching on performance and skill development needs. These are invaluable skills I learned early in my career that I carry with me today."

5.

What do you consider to be your greatest achievement to date?

The interviewer wants to learn more about you.Get ready to brag about yourself! What is the one thing in your life that has been the most meaningful to you? Share this achievement with the interviewer, and explain why it meant so much to you. It can be work related or non-work related, and it should be whatever stands out most in your mind as the greatest thing you have done to date.

Ryan's Answer

"I am the first person in my family to graduate from college. Knowing that I have come this far setting an example for my younger siblings is a great feeling!"

6.

What would you most like to accomplish if you had this job?

What motivated you to become a parole officer? This makes a great answer to the question. What motivated you to apply for this specific job? This might make another great answer. Knowing that you will serve a community with a high need can be a big driver. Whatever you would most like to accomplish, share it with the interviewer.

Ryan's Answer

"You measure what you manage. For me, it is all about returning criminals to the community with a low reentry rate. I will work hard and smart to integrate criminals back into society with goals of not returning to the lifestyle that put them in the system."

7.

Why do you want to be a Parole Officer?

The interviewer wants to hear that you are passionate about a career as a parole officer. Take this opportunity to share with the interviewer if a specific life event leads you to a career as a parole officer.

Ryan's Answer

"When I was young, a good friend of mine experienced a life event because of a criminal and I saw first hand how it impacted their lives and the lives of their family. I made the decision then and am carrying it out now to take a career where I could be responsible for monitoring recently released criminal offenders to ensure they are integrating back into life after serving their time. I take great pride in my work and am proud to be interviewing for this opportunity."

8.

What kind of writing have you done?

The interviewer wants to learn more about your background.What kind of writing have you done in past parole officer jobs? In school? At other places of employment? Simply share these with the interviewer, and give a high-level overview of what the writing entailed.

Ryan's Answer

"In school, I had to write papers every semester on a variety of topics including everything from general education coursework to specific parole officer related topics. In previous roles, I was responsible for writing casework and investigative reports on criminals returning to the community."

9.

How would you rate your education?

The interviewer is hoping you will talk positively about your education just as you would talk positively about your future employer. Now is a great time to highlight the things that you really liked about your education. Start off by telling the interviewer that your education was valuable, and you recognize that you will still need additional training when you enter the field. Next, share the things that you really liked about receiving your education which you felt were valuable.

Ryan's Answer

"My formal education was extremely helpful in understanding the work I wanted to get into. Education, to me, is an ongoing process and I am constantly learning new trade strategies to be a better professional while developing personally."

10.

Do you have a specialized area?

Be open with the interviewer, and share if you have a specialized area that is already established. If you do not have a specialized area, that's okay too! Simply tell the interviewer that you do not have a specialized area. There is a possibility that you are hoping to specialize in a specific area at some point in your career. If that is the case, be sure to tell the interviewer. You may get a great interviewer who will ensure you get help being placed in this specialty, so be sure to share your hopes!

Ryan's Answer

"One of the areas of my work that I like to specialize in and want to continue to develop is the dynamics, impact, and effects of addiction. It is very rewarding to work through recovery with clients, victims, and families."

11.

What honors have you received in your life?

The interviewer wants to learn more about who you are as a person and what you have accomplished. No honor is too small to mention. Take the opportunity to boast about yourself. Start off by sharing any professional recognition or awards you have received. You may include special opportunities you have received as well such as being a part of a start-up team. Next, mention any honors you received while in school that made a positive impact on your life. Simply share the honors you received, and explain why they were meaningful to you.

Ryan's Answer

"I have had a lot of fun receiving honors in my life and professional career so far! While receiving my education, I developed a reputation in the debate club and received many honors. I have been awarded certificates of honors for investigative casework done in criminal court work and have been recognized by communities for positive transition rates of previous serving criminals into the community."

12.

Tell me about your experience in your internship?

The interviewer wants to hear that you will talk about your internship positively. Begin by telling the interviewer 3-4 things that you really liked about your internship experience, and discuss how you feel your internship experience helped prepare you for the role you are interviewing for. Be sure to mention that you understand your internship cannot teach you everything, and you look forward to learning more as you begin your career.

Ryan's Answer

"While interning at ABC Facility, I worked with a Parole Officer who I consider to be a great mentor to this day. She taught me how to follow best practices in assessing the personal needs of adult offenders and in determining treatment plans in a way that I could not have learned in a book. This internship taught me how to work as a team member, share knowledge and skills, accept, adapt, offer and respond to coaching on performance and skill development needs."

13.

Give me three examples of what would make you leave this job?

The interviewer wants to hear that you will stay with the agency for a long period of time and there are not any minor things that would result in you leaving the role. Think of significant deal breakers when it comes to employment.

Ryan's Answer

"When I commit to a role, I like to stay there as long as possible. It would take something that compromises my values to lead me to leave. Such as learning of a major ethical issue in operations that leadership was supporting. Life happens and I would consider a change if presented with a major family emergency that required my attention. Family always comes first. Lastly, perhaps if I knew that I wasn't making a difference. I want to look back on my life knowing that I spent my days well making a positive impact."

14.

What do you know about the position?

We recommend that you review the job description online before arriving for your interview. Come prepared to provide an overview of the position based on the job description by stating 5-6 key duties that the job will entail.

Ryan's Answer

"This role plays a critical part of this integration of criminal offenders after serving their conviction time. It involves interviewing, counseling and guiding clients through an important time in their lives. Our effectiveness can determine whether or not criminals reenter the system or carry on an active, contributing life in their local communities. It is something I look forward to taking part of."

15.

What did you learn about being a Parole Officer in college?

This question is designed to gain an understanding of your perspective of the job you have applied to. During your college career, you likely had a few key takeaways. What things were you told that impacted you? Did you hear any special presentations that left you with important information about the field? What things tugged at your heartstrings? These are all great things to mention when you hear this question. Be ready to share 3-4 key takeaways that you had from college that helped prepare you for this career.

Ryan's Answer

"While receiving my Bachelor's degree, I learned valuable knowledge from the corrections, criminal justice, counseling, social work or related fields. I learned theories and strategies for effective probation/parole supervision, corrections, social service counseling and case management capacity, This has equipped me with the knowledge and know how to perform this role above and beyond your expectations."

More Interview Q&As
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33 Parole Officer Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.

Interview Questions

  1. In what areas do you typically have the least amount of patience at work?
  2. What kind of preparation did you do for this interview?
  3. What skills do you have that will benefit our agency?
  4. What was the most valuable thing you learned in your internship?
  5. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement to date?
  6. What would you most like to accomplish if you had this job?
  7. Why do you want to be a Parole Officer?
  8. What kind of writing have you done?
  9. How would you rate your education?
  10. Do you have a specialized area?
  11. What honors have you received in your life?
  12. Tell me about your experience in your internship?
  13. Give me three examples of what would make you leave this job?
  14. What do you know about the position?
  15. What did you learn about being a Parole Officer in college?
  16. Have you completed any volunteer work in a juvenile facility?
  17. What have you done to improve your communication skills?
  18. How will you handle dealing with heavily convicted criminals?
  19. What do you have to offer that your competition in this position cannot?
  20. You must appear in court and speak in front of a judge, what experience do you have speaking in front of a group?
  21. You will be in constant communication with our criminals, what type of experience do you have communicating with this class of people?
  22. How well do you multi-task?
  23. Which is more important to you, money or satisfaction?
  24. Did you take any psychology courses in college?
  25. Do you think there should be education in prison to reduce prisoners from returning? Why?
  26. Have you ever been convicted of a crime?
  27. How generous of a person are you? Give me some examples?
  28. What do you know about our law enforcement agency?
  29. How do you deal with stressful situations?
  30. Do you speak a second language fluently?
  31. Do you have any role models?
  32. Will you help those with minor crimes get back on their feet?
  33. What was your most difficult decision in the last six months?
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