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Behavioral Nursing Interview
Questions

20 Questions and Answers by Kelly Burlison
Updated April 14th, 2019 | Kelly Burlison, MPH, is an experienced professional
with over ten years of experience interviewing in the health care field.
Job Interviews     Careers     Health    

Question 1 of 20

How would you handle a situation where you were curious about what was documented in a friend or family member's electronic health record?

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1.

How would you handle a situation where you were curious about what was documented in a friend or family member's electronic health record?

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or better known as HIPAA, is a federal privacy law that protects patients' personal and health information. Under the HIPAA rule, accessing medical records for family members or any other individuals out of curiosity is a violation, and doing so could lead to disciplinary action or even termination. Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are often audited to determine if nursing and other staff members accessed any records not related to their daily responsibilities. The interviewer is asking this question to determine if the candidate understands that this is a HIPAA violation and that it is a serious offense. To successfully answer this question, the candidate should not only express the fact that they would never violate the privacy of their loved ones or other patients but also inform the interviewer that they understand this would be a HIPAA violation.

"I would never look in a patient's medical record out of curiosity, whether the patient was someone I knew or not. This is not only a violation of HIPAA, but it is also unethical. If I were a patient, I would not want anyone looking in my record to simply snoop around, and I want to treat all the patients at my facility with the same dignity and respect. Many of my friends and family members are or have been patients at the facility in which I work, and while I have been curious about their health before, I have never considered violating their privacy by looking in their medical records. If these individuals wanted me to know about their health status or conditions, they would inform me themselves."

Kelly's Answer

"I would never look in a patient's medical record out of curiosity, whether the patient was someone I knew or not. This is not only a violation of HIPAA, but it is also unethical. If I were a patient, I would not want anyone looking in my record to simply snoop around, and I want to treat all the patients at my facility with the same dignity and respect. Many of my friends and family members are or have been patients at the facility in which I work, and while I have been curious about their health before, I have never considered violating their privacy by looking in their medical records. If these individuals wanted me to know about their health status or conditions, they would inform me themselves."

2.

Due to emerging technology, the nursing career has evolved and technology is incorporated in many aspects of modern nursing. How do you handle a situation when new technology is introduced that changes your nursing practice?

The interviewer is asking this question to determine how the candidate will respond to changes in their nursing practice due to innovations in technology. Just as technology has changed the way the general public lives, it has significantly changed the practice of medicine and nursing. From Electronic Health Records to electronic instruments, health care does not look the same as it did a few years ago, nevertheless, a few decades ago. If the candidate is unable to adapt to ever-changing technology, they will be unable to effectively care for patients in the modern health care environment. To effectively answer this question, the candidate should be honest about their technical skills, whether they are limited or advanced, and discuss the effort they will put forth to adapt to the new technology. A more successful answer to the question would include an example from the candidate's nursing career when they successfully adapted to new technology.

Kelly's Answer

"I am not the best at adapting to new technology, so new technologies are always a bit of a challenge for me. However, I am always able to eventually adapt, because I am determined to learn how to use it. For example, when my last company changed to a new EHR system, it was completely different and was extremely hard for me at first. But, instead of giving up, I took extra training, took copious notes, and made help-sheets for myself so I could remember specific shortcuts for how to use the system. This helped me adapt to the system more quickly than most nurses who were having the same challenges as me. If I can help myself get through that situation, I feel that I can get through any challenge with technology."

3.

You are caring for a pediatric patient whose parent is refusing routine vaccinations due to information she has read on the internet. How do you respond in this situation?

Due to misinformation that is widely available on the internet, many people are refusing routine vaccines for themselves and their children. While the vaccine controversy is likely the most prominent example of patients refusing medical interventions due to misinformation, this issue does not lie in vaccines alone; there are many preventative and tertiary medical procedures that patients refuse. In these cases, it is the responsibility of the nursing staff to help the patient or guardian understand the importance of the recommended medical intervention. The interviewer is asking this question to determine how the candidate would respond to this situation and to see if they would help educate the patient using scientific evidence. To effectively answer this question, the candidate should indicate that they would remain respectful but attempt to educate the patient or guardian using facts. A more successful answer would include an example of how the candidate helped change a patient or guardian's stance so they would accept the medical intervention.

Kelly's Answer

"I spent many years as a pediatric nurse, so I have dealt with this exact scenario many times. However, one instance, in particular, stands out to me. In this instance, the mother of a two-year-old patient was refusing all her child's vaccines because of something she read on the internet about vaccines causing autism. Instead of completely dismissing the parent's concerns, I told her I understood why she was concerned and talked with her about each of her concerns, where I presented facts. Then, I left the mother alone to think about it for a few minutes, and upon my return, she agreed to allow us to administer the vaccines. This is the way I would handle any patient or guardian's concerns about medical interventions, with empathy, understanding, and facts."

4.

How will you approach coming into a team of nurses who have been working together for quite some time, who have already solidified their working relationships, and who clinically, have a very specific way of doing things?

Starting a new job can be intimidating, but when a professional is joining a team that is already cohesive, it can be even more challenging. This can sometimes be even more complicated in clinical settings when joining teams of nurses or other clinical professionals, who can, at times, be difficult to break into. Members of nursing teams rely on one another in so many ways, which creates significant bonds among team members. Unfortunately, because of this, it can be difficult for new team members to feel welcome and to become a functioning member of the team. The interviewer is asking this question to first make the candidate aware of the situation, and second, determine their approach to becoming part of the team. To successfully answer this question, the candidate should indicate that they would be patient about being welcomed into the team community, but also suggest that they would strive to develop relationships with their coworkers to make an effort in becoming a part of the team. A more successful answer would include an example of how the candidate dealt with a similar situation coming into a new team during their nursing career.

Kelly's Answer

"This team sounds very similar to the team I am working on when I first joined my department. I had recently moved to the area from across the country and had come from a job as a research nurse, so my joining the team on the inpatient geriatrics unit was quite the change. The nurses on the team were not very welcoming to me, as they felt I did not belong on their team, where everyone had been there for at least two years, but most of them for more than five. It was difficult for me, but I knew it wasn't impossible to eventually become a functional member of the team, so as my colleagues did their best to ignore me at first, I didn't take it personally, but did my best to be courteous and friendly to them, and eventually, they started letting me in. Before long, I was welcomed into their group, and I immediately began trying to loosen the culture so that the team wasn't so unwelcoming to newcomers."

5.

What would you do in a situation where you need household medical supplies, such as adhesive bandages, and you are aware that there is an abundance of them in the supply room at work?

Supplies are a significant cost to medical facilities, and it is the responsibility of all staff members to protect such supplies in order to control costs. When there are supplies, such as adhesive bandages, that are not secured or regularly inventoried, it can be tempting for employees to take such supplies for use at home. However, this behavior is unacceptable as it is theft of company resources. To successfully answer this question, the candidate should make it very clear to the interviewer that they will not use or take medical supplies for personal use.

"I would not take the supplies from work, even though it may seem like the easy thing to do. If everyone who works in the unit took supplies for personal use, the cost to the facility would be extreme, and I want to do what I can to control costs. However, even with costs aside, taking supplies for personal use is stealing and unethical, and it is not something I stand for as a nurse or a person."

Kelly's Answer

"I would not take the supplies from work, even though it may seem like the easy thing to do. If everyone who works in the unit took supplies for personal use, the cost to the facility would be extreme, and I want to do what I can to control costs. However, even with costs aside, taking supplies for personal use is stealing and unethical, and it is not something I stand for as a nurse or a person."

6.

As clinical healthcare professionals, we have all been in situations where we have developed special bonds with patients and their families. Tell me how you handle such situations when these patients face difficult diagnoses or unexpectedly pass away.

Because nurses spend so much time caring for their patients and their families, many times, they develop special bonds and relationships with these individuals. The bonds that nurses form with their patients are also created due to the empathetic personality that comes naturally to nurses. Many times, when patients are facing a difficult medical diagnosis or are at the end of their lives, it can be difficult for nurses, since they have created these personal bonds with their patients. The interviewer is asking this question to determine how the candidate would react in such a situation, and the expected response would be for the nurse to offer the family their support and condolences and allow the family privacy to grieve. The candidate should avoid providing an example of when they became overly emotional in the presence of family members.

Kelly's Answer

"Working in the inpatient section of a cancer center, this is, unfortunately, something I have dealt with many times in my career. I always strive to build relationships with my patients and their family members, as I find this makes them feel more comfortable and at ease in a very difficult situation. However, because I develop these personal connections, it is often devastating for me when things do not go well for the patient and I see them and their family members upset. In these types of situations, I first give the patient and/or family, depending on the situation, a bit of time to be with one another, then I stop in and ask if they need anything and offer my condolences. I also provide information on community resources, if needed. It is my job to support the family and not make the situation harder on them, so if I find myself becoming emotional, I step into a private staff-only area and take a few seconds to compose myself."

7.

Despite our best efforts in providing care, sometimes there are family members who are unhappy with the care the patient is receiving. Tell me how you would handle such a situation.

Having a family member or loved one who is ill and/or in the hospital can be a very stressful situation, and sometimes, despite the best efforts of clinical staff, family members of patients are unhappy with the care their loved ones receive. In such situations, it is important for nurses and clinical staff to avoid becoming offensive and to express their empathy for the family member, even if they are unhappy with them. If a nurse is unable to resolve the situation with the patient's family, they should escalate the situation to their supervisor. To successfully answer this question, the candidate should tell the interviewer that they would listen to the family member's concerns and try to meet their needs, if possible. A more successful answer to this question would include an example of how the candidate successfully mitigated such a situation in their nursing career.

Kelly's Answer

"I have dealt with many situations like this in my nursing career, and I have found that usually, the family member just needs someone to listen to their concerns and reassure them. I have rarely had situations where I had to escalate the complaint to my supervisor. I actually dealt with such a situation a couple of weeks ago, when I was caring for a pediatric patient who was severely injured in an accident. The patient's family members were beside themselves with worry and grief, and after a couple of days, began to complain about the care they were receiving. I did not take offense to the complaints, but instead, I listened to the family members' concerns and then reassured them that I, and my colleagues, were doing everything we could and would continue to do so. Having this reassurance helped ease the family's concerns, but I think they really just needed to express their frustrations."

8.

You are a floor nurse in your unit and have close relationships with several of your colleagues. When your supervisor goes on vacation, she appoints you to be in charge. How do you approach supervising the nursing staff in your unit?

Oftentimes, when a nursing supervisor is out on vacation, sick, or personal leave, they will appoint someone from their staff to serve as acting supervisor in their absence. While serving as acting supervisor, it is important for a nurse to treat their colleagues fairly and put any personal relationships they have with their coworkers aside. The interviewer is asking this question to determine how the candidate would respond in this situation, to see if the candidate would treat all their colleagues equally. To effectively answer this question, the candidate should indicate that they would put all personal relationships with their coworkers aside while they are acting as supervisor and treat everyone fairly. A more successful answer to this question would include an example of how the candidate effectively served as acting supervisor of a nursing unit during their career.

Kelly's Answer

"If I was serving as acting supervisor, I would set any and all relationships I had with my peers aside and treat everyone the same. I have been in this situation before, where I have stood in for my manager while she was on vacation, and I have found that the only way to be successful and fair, is to compartmentalize everything while in charge. It can be a difficult situation to be in, as sometimes your work friends want you to make special concessions for them, but in order to be fair, you can't do that. So, in this situation, I would make it clear that I am not their friend, I am their supervisor, and I am going to follow the rules, as stated in the handbook, for everyone."

9.

You are very busy and a bit overwhelmed with your daily tasks but it is time for your morning team huddle. What do you do?

The interviewer is asking this question to assess the emphasis the candidate places on the team in which they work. While the candidate may be busy and overwhelmed, it is still important that they attend the 10-minute team huddle to debrief with their team members, unless there is an emergency and they cannot attend the huddle. During the huddle, a couple of things may happen - other team members may be able to help the candidate with their work, or, the candidate may learn that everyone on the team is extremely busy and they need to redistribute work. To effectively answer this question, the candidate should indicate that they would take time to attend the team huddle, despite being overwhelmed.

Kelly's Answer

"I would make sure all my patients were properly cared for then attend the team huddle. It is my understanding that huddle meetings are very short and are important for team updates, so I would make it a priority to attend. And, if I were so overwhelmed that I felt I was at capacity, a huddle meeting is where I could express my concerns and let it be known that I may need help. I know that nursing can be overwhelming at times, but it is important to remember that we are all part of a team, and attending daily huddle meetings are very important."

10.

Many times, we require our nurses to cross-train in other departments so they can be available to float when needed. How do you feel about the potential of cross-training and floating on short notice?

Oftentimes, in facilities with multiple medical specialties or sub-specialty departments, nurses are cross-trained so they can be available to float during staffing shortages. This allows management to fill nursing gaps when needed. Since nursing among specialties is not created equal, cross-training and floating can sometimes cause stress for nurses, if they are unable to quickly adapt to the varying requirements for caring for patients in the different specialty departments. The interviewer is asking this question to determine how adaptable the candidate would be in such situations, and how willing they would be to cross-train and float to other departments. To effectively answer this question, the candidate should indicate that they would be excited to expand their nursing skills by cross-training and that floating at a moment's notice would not be an issue for them. A more successful answer to this question would include an example of how the candidate successfully cross-trained and floated to other departments within their nursing career.

Kelly's Answer

"I would love the opportunity to cross-train and float to other departments. So far, my nursing career has been limited to geriatric care, which has been great, but I do want to expand my skills to other areas, and I think cross-training would be a great opportunity to do so. I can see how floating could be stressful if I were to be called to another department at a moment's notice, but if I took my cross-training seriously and learned as much as I could, I would be prepared to go into another department and pick up where needed. If this works out, I would hope I could cross-train in as many specialties as possible, so I can learn as much as I can."

11.

You are in a situation where you have been putting forth a lot of effort at your nursing job, but you received critical feedback from your supervisor during a bi-annual review. How do you respond to this situation?

Similar to other careers, there are times when employees put forth great efforts but still receive critical feedback from their supervisors. Because nursing is a career requires a significant amount of effort and care, many times, it takes nurses many years to master their craft. The interviewer is asking this question to determine how the candidate would respond to critical feedback, even when they have been putting forth a significant amount of effort in their work. To effectively answer this question, the candidate should indicate that they would maturely take their supervisor's advice into consideration to determine how they can improve their nursing practice. A more successful answer to this question would include a real-life example of how the candidate has taken constructive criticism given by a superior to advance their nursing skills when they already felt they were working at their capacity.

Kelly's Answer

"I would respond to this situation like a similar situation from one of my past jobs. When I first started working as a nurse supervisor in OB/GYN, I was a bit overwhelmed but was giving it my best effort and thought I was doing a great job. However, when it was time for my annual review with my manager, I received a lot of negative feedback, which was quite surprising. Rather than getting upset, I took a step back and thought about why I was receiving the feedback and came up with an improvement plan for myself. By doing this, I was able to further improve my nursing practice and my skills as a supervisor. It turns out, my manager was giving me advice on how to improve, and if I hadn't responded the way I did, it wouldn't have turned out to be such a positive outcome."

12.

You have had a friendly relationship with one of your nursing colleagues for quite some time, but recently, she has been demonstrating passive-aggressive behavior and has been unwilling to cooperate with you. Tell me how you respond to this situation.

Nursing is a career that requires teamwork and cooperation among members of the nursing staff. However, because nursing can be a very stressful occupation and because it requires so much collaboration among team members, conflicts among coworkers often occur. As with many other career settings, these conflicts are not resolved appropriately and employees cope by using passive-aggressive behaviors. The interviewer is asking this question to understand how the candidate would respond in a situation in which a coworker is demonstrating passive-aggressive behavior. To effectively answer this question, the candidate should indicate that they would calmly and maturely approach their coworker to resolve any underlying conflicts. A more successful answer to this question would include the candidate's own experience in resolving a conflict with a colleague.

Kelly's Answer

"I have been a nurse for over ten years, and unfortunately, I have dealt with similar situations many times. I find that it is difficult to avoid conflicts when you spend so much time with your colleagues in such a high-stress situation. I would handle this situation similar to the way I responded to the passive-aggressive attitude that I was getting from my co-worker, Vivian, a couple of years ago. Vivian and I had worked together for a couple of years and had a relatively close working relationship. Each morning, she and I would chit-chat about our personal lives before we clocked-in. However, one morning, Vivian's attitude suddenly changed and she would not engage in conversation. While I didn't think much about it the first day, but when she continued to ignore me both in the mornings and while we were on shift, I decided to approach her about it. Instead of being accusatory about her behavior, I approached Vivian and asked her if everything was okay between us. By doing this, I learned that Vivian was upset with me over something that had happened on the floor, and we were able to work it out peacefully."

13.

Workplace violence is a common issue for nurses. We have protocols in place to prevent workplace violence, but sometimes patients and family members still become violent. Tell me how you would handle such a situation.

Unfortunately, nurses and other clinicians are often subjected to violent acts, committed by patients and/or family members. Many times, when patients become violent, it is unintentional and a result of confusion, pain, mental health issues, or other ailments. However, whether the violence is intentional or a result of a medical issue, these situations put nurses in a stressful and dangerous situation. In such situations, it is important for nurses to stay calm and follow protocols, such as alerting colleagues and security of the situation. Primarily, it is important that the nurse not attempt to mitigate the situation themselves and/or become defensive and retaliate against the aggressor. To successfully answer this question, the candidate should ensure the interviewer that they would stay calm, follow protocol, and not retaliate against the patient or family member. A more successful answer to this question would include an example of how the candidate followed protocol and effectively dealt with a violent or threatening situation.

Kelly's Answer

"In my nursing career, I have been in situations where patients have become violent, but all were due to dementia or confusion, as I have spent a significant amount of time caring for elderly patients. In these situations, I have always followed protocol for de-escalating the situation or using restraints, if appropriate. If I were ever in a situation where a patient or guest was intentionally violent or threatening, I would attempt to de-escalate the situation, and if I were unable to, I would follow protocol, which I hope would include involving management and/or security. Never would I retaliate against a patient or family member, and I would be sure to follow the policy of the company."

14.

Tell me how you would handle a situation where you feel a patient is suicidal or a danger to themselves, but they deny these feelings.

Suicide, unfortunately, is very common and, many times, signs that a person is suicidal are missed by family members, friends, and even healthcare professionals. Even if a nurse is not working in a behavioral health environment, they must always be cognizant of a patient's mental well-being and stay alert for signs of suicidal behavior. Even if a patient denies being suicidal or does not score high on a mental health screening, if a nurse feels strongly that a patient may be a risk to themselves, they must alert the patient's physician. To successfully answer this question, the candidate should indicate that they would alert the patient's physician or the attending physician of their concerns, so a full mental health evaluation can be conducted. A more successful answer would include a specific example of how the candidate successfully helped a suicidal patient get help.

Kelly's Answer

"I have never experienced this type of situation first hand, but if I felt strongly that a patient was a danger to themselves, I could not allow it to go unreported, even if the patient denied such suicidal feelings. As a nurse, it is my job to protect patients, and to protect a patient in such a situation, I would alert the physician I was working with and ask them to further evaluate the patient. I am always cognizant of patient's behavior and mental health, even though I work in gastroenterology because I am aware of how important it is to recognize a patient who is in a mental health crisis."

15.

Tell me about a time in your nursing career when you made a big mistake. How did you handle the situation?

This question is very important for the interviewer, not to learn about the candidate's past mistakes, but to learn if the candidate is able to recognize their mistakes and how they handle situations in which they make mistakes. Mistakes are common in the clinical environment, and it is important that nurses and other clinical professionals be able to recognize and take responsibility for their errors. The candidate should be honest in answering this question and not be afraid to share information on the mistakes they have made. To successfully answer this question, the candidate should provide an example of a mistake they have made in the past and tell the interviewer how they successfully mitigated the situation. A more successful answer to this question would include details of when the candidate took a mistake they made and spearheaded a policy change or education program to ensure the same mistake was not made by their colleagues.

"In my nursing career, I have made many mistakes, but the one that stands out to me is when I was working in an outpatient infusion clinic and accidentally administered the wrong infusion medication to a patient. There were two patients with the same first name with appointments close together, and they were both in the waiting room at the same time. When I went out and attempted to call, let's call her Jane A, I only said, 'Jane' and Jane B came back with me. My mistake got even worse when I did not verify Jane's last name. The mistake was eventually caught by my colleague, but unfortunately, I had already started her infusion. It was a terrible mistake and I wanted to be sure it never happened again, so I helped my supervisor develop new procedures for verifying patient information, and I helped train my colleagues on the new procedures."

Kelly's Answer

"In my nursing career, I have made many mistakes, but the one that stands out to me is when I was working in an outpatient infusion clinic and accidentally administered the wrong infusion medication to a patient. There were two patients with the same first name with appointments close together, and they were both in the waiting room at the same time. When I went out and attempted to call, let's call her Jane A, I only said, 'Jane' and Jane B came back with me. My mistake got even worse when I did not verify Jane's last name. The mistake was eventually caught by my colleague, but unfortunately, I had already started her infusion. It was a terrible mistake and I wanted to be sure it never happened again, so I helped my supervisor develop new procedures for verifying patient information, and I helped train my colleagues on the new procedures."

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Interview Questions

  1. How would you handle a situation where you were curious about what was documented in a friend or family member's electronic health record?
  2. Due to emerging technology, the nursing career has evolved and technology is incorporated in many aspects of modern nursing. How do you handle a situation when new technology is introduced that changes your nursing practice?
  3. You are caring for a pediatric patient whose parent is refusing routine vaccinations due to information she has read on the internet. How do you respond in this situation?
  4. How will you approach coming into a team of nurses who have been working together for quite some time, who have already solidified their working relationships, and who clinically, have a very specific way of doing things?
  5. What would you do in a situation where you need household medical supplies, such as adhesive bandages, and you are aware that there is an abundance of them in the supply room at work?
  6. As clinical healthcare professionals, we have all been in situations where we have developed special bonds with patients and their families. Tell me how you handle such situations when these patients face difficult diagnoses or unexpectedly pass away.
  7. Despite our best efforts in providing care, sometimes there are family members who are unhappy with the care the patient is receiving. Tell me how you would handle such a situation.
  8. You are a floor nurse in your unit and have close relationships with several of your colleagues. When your supervisor goes on vacation, she appoints you to be in charge. How do you approach supervising the nursing staff in your unit?
  9. You are very busy and a bit overwhelmed with your daily tasks but it is time for your morning team huddle. What do you do?
  10. Many times, we require our nurses to cross-train in other departments so they can be available to float when needed. How do you feel about the potential of cross-training and floating on short notice?
  11. You are in a situation where you have been putting forth a lot of effort at your nursing job, but you received critical feedback from your supervisor during a bi-annual review. How do you respond to this situation?
  12. You have had a friendly relationship with one of your nursing colleagues for quite some time, but recently, she has been demonstrating passive-aggressive behavior and has been unwilling to cooperate with you. Tell me how you respond to this situation.
  13. Workplace violence is a common issue for nurses. We have protocols in place to prevent workplace violence, but sometimes patients and family members still become violent. Tell me how you would handle such a situation.
  14. Tell me how you would handle a situation where you feel a patient is suicidal or a danger to themselves, but they deny these feelings.
  15. Tell me about a time in your nursing career when you made a big mistake. How did you handle the situation?
  16. Many times, in Electronic Health Records, generic drug names are used in lieu of brand-names. Tell me how you would handle a situation where you know the brand-name of a drug you need to place an order for, but you are unsure of its generic name.
  17. How would you handle a situation where a new manager or supervisor starts on your unit and immediately starts changing everything about the way the unit has operated for the past few years?
  18. Tell me how you would handle a situation in which you are pressed for time and it would be easier for you to provide care to your patients if you do not follow established procedures and protocols.
  19. You are caring for a patient nearing the end of their life who has a clear Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order in their advanced directive, but when the patient codes, their family member who is present begs you to take action. How do you respond?
  20. Tell me how you would handle a situation where you thought you saw one of your nursing colleagues pocketing a dose of medication that was supposed to be given to a patient.
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