Interviews Questions by Career
Interviews Questions by Company
Interviews Questions by Topic
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Radiation Therapists Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated July 14th, 2020 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Job Interviews     Careers     Health    
Question 1 of 30
Describe your relationship with the last physician you worked for.
View Answers
How to Answer
Radiation therapists have close working relationships with the doctors at their practice. They will rely on you to provide the best client care during treatment and to manage client information. Trust comes with time and experience. Describe your relationship with the physician you spent the most time with during your clinicals. Or, if you have experience working directly under a doctor in a work setting, talk about how you nurtured that relationship. This question is not the time to bad mouth or criticize any past physicians. Remember - it's a very small world and you don't want to end up putting your foot in your mouth!
1000s of Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Answer Examples
1.
Describe your relationship with the last physician you worked for.
Radiation therapists have close working relationships with the doctors at their practice. They will rely on you to provide the best client care during treatment and to manage client information. Trust comes with time and experience. Describe your relationship with the physician you spent the most time with during your clinicals. Or, if you have experience working directly under a doctor in a work setting, talk about how you nurtured that relationship. This question is not the time to bad mouth or criticize any past physicians. Remember - it's a very small world and you don't want to end up putting your foot in your mouth!

Rachelle's Answer #1
"The relationship with the doctor I currently work under feels more like a partnership. She allows me to take the lead when she knows that I can, and takes control of other situations, while still taking the time to teach and train me. I appreciate a leader who takes the time to invest in my learning. The more I know, the better our clinic can run, and the better we can serve our deserving patients."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My current physician leader is a great leader with a strong personality. He knows how to get the work done right the first time, and I genuinely appreciate having learned from someone so talented and straightforward."
2.
How do you deal with stress?
Your ability to manage stress will directly influence your ability to provide optimal patient care. Before answering this question, think of some tools that have helped you handle your stress. What will you do when you can't take a break when you need it?

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I've learned some helpful breathing techniques that I can do while I'm at work. Even when I'm feeling rushed or overwhelmed by a patient situation, I can slow down my breath and remain calm. Patient care will always be my top priority, and that's why I've learned to manage my stress effectively."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Stress is part of any demanding job, and I embrace it to the fullest. I take good care of myself and prioritize my workload to maintain a healthy balance in my stress levels."
3.
How do you handle a larger than average workload?
Time management is a skill that takes experience and fine-tuning. As you learn to prioritize your daily tasks and start using tools and tricks to help focus your attention, you become more effective with your time. It helps to understand your weaknesses and what types of environments aid in your productivity. Some people work better late at night while others prefer early morning shifts.

The interviewer wants to know that you can handle the workload required of you in this position and that you will not become overwhelmed when workloads increase. When workloads increase, stress levels do too. How do you react?

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I make sure that I am clear on expectations and required tasks, asking questions to clarify and prevent misunderstandings. I am thorough with patients, making detailed assessments before treatment and keeping track of time during visits. When I am more calculated with my time, while still ensuring complete thoroughness, I can keep on track during any busy day."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"When I have a large workload on my plate, I do not stress over the tasks that are in front of me. Rather, I make a simple plan of which tasks are a high priority and which tasks are a lower priority. The higher priority tasks, I complete first. Through this system, I can focus on my tasks individually, rather than stress out by the multitude of tasks ahead of me."
Anonymous Answer
"In my current job, I frequently encounter a larger than average workload. Possessing excellent time management skills is essential to success. Honestly, I'm not sure that that is something that can be taught. My mind sees ten moves ahead, and I quickly prioritize tasks in the order that makes sense and keeps the workday moving efficiently."
Rachelle's Answer
It seems you are quick and able to process needs very quickly. If you had to help a new coworker who couldn't keep up, what methodology would you recommend to them?
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
4.
How would your coworkers describe you?
When you think about descriptive words for yourself, consider qualities that are relevant to this position. Think about your personality traits and how they correspond with some of the responsibilities of the job description. Reflect on some of the positive comments you have received from coworkers in the past. Pick 2-3 traits that show off some of the strengths that will make you a fantastic asset to this clinic or hospital. Don't be afraid to brag a little, but avoid sounding pompous or over-confident.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I often hear from my coworkers that they are energized by being around me. I try to stay positive, even in the most discouraging situations. Maintaining an upbeat work environment is important when working with patients who are fighting to beat cancer."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"If asked, I believe my coworkers would describe me as a 'glass half full' kind of person. I am always learning something new, and like to share that information with my team. I am willing to help, and exercise compassion in everything that I do."
5.
When did you realize you wanted to be a radiation therapist?
Share your personal experience and passion for helping others. Perhaps there was a significant event, like losing a family member to cancer or undergoing treatment yourself. If so, share how these experiences affected you and influenced your decision to pursue this career. The interviewer is interested in getting to know you, your background and your motivation.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"When my mother was going through breast cancer for the second time, I knew there could never be enough professionals who offered care for these people fighting for their lives. I was already toying with the idea of a career in medicine, but this particular event made my decision for me. Thankfully, since then, my mom has been in remission. A huge part of that was the knowledge and support she received from her radiation therapists."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I was in my first year of nursing when I decided that I wanted to change my major to be in radiography. I appreciated how technical the job was. Also, anatomy and physiology was always a strong suit for me, which made pursuing a career as a radiation therapist feel like a good fit for me."
6.
How would you describe your overall academic performance?
When an interviewer asks about your education, speak confidently about the work you have accomplished! Becoming a radiation therapist is no easy task, as you know. Talk about what you learned, and share some of the highlights of your training and experience from your clinical rotations. What lessons did you gain that have influenced your approach to healthcare? Explain how hard you worked and some of the challenges you encountered.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"When I graduated with my bachelor's degree in radiation therapy three years ago, I could have never imagined how much discipline would be required to get me through. I did very well, graduating in the top three of my class, but it was not an easy task. I would describe my academic performance as focused, exciting, and eye-opening. I now feel well prepared for a career in compassionate healthcare."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I could not have loved school more than I did - truly! I took part in a good amount of university activities, playing a role on the student council while also tutoring other radiography students. My experience was well rounded, and I graduated with a 3.86 GPA."
7.
Tell me about your experience training others.
Coaching and training others is always a great experience to add to your resume and can also be fun! For this role, you may have an opportunity to train new staff on equipment and treatments you perform. You may even have a chance to do a presentation on a new form of technology used to treat cancer.

The medical field is always changing as new research brings improvements and inventions. Share how you have led teams, coached new employees or trained a team on a new technology or an improved practice. If you are new to your career, with little career-related training experience, you could discuss how you coached someone while obtaining your degree, or helped another intern during rotations.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I recently trained three of our team members on the new Cobalt machine we received in our clinic last month. It felt great to be seen as a subject matter expert, considering all the years' experience that I have with this type of equipment. Since the training, I have remained a go-to resource for my team members whenever a question comes up."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"While attending University, I was a volunteer tutor for the radiation program. Primarily, I assisted first and second-year students on topics such as principles of oncology, patient care, and dose calculations. It feels nice to teach what you know, and I look forward to being in a position where I can train others, once again."
8.
What are your salary expectations?
In many states, it is now illegal for hiring authorities to ask about your current earnings. A question like this will give the interviewer a solid idea of what you are hoping to earn. When you change positions, you want to see an increase in wage.

Most interviewees will typically aim for a 7-15% increase for each time they change jobs. This range offers room for negotiations with the new company. This percentage increase reflects economic inflation, unique skills you bring to the table from the last time you joined an organization, and an increase in responsibilities.

The best way to discuss your salary expectations is to use your current earnings as an example if you are comfortable doing so. If this makes you uncomfortable, do give as many indicators as you can. Be open, and honest. Transparency is the best choice when salary based questions arise.

If you are newer to your career, or the area, and are unsure of what a fair ask may be, there are many reliable salary calculators available online.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I can share with you what I am currently earning, and where I would like to be in my next position. Currently, I am earning a base salary of $78K plus full health benefits. This year, I would like to earn around $85K, to reflect the new training I recently acquired."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I would like to earn slightly above where I am now. Currently, I earn $30/hour plus benefits. My target income for the coming year is $75,000."
9.
What qualities should a radiation therapist have?
Working with patients, doctors and other medical staff requires a lot of dedication and a fantastic attitude. Think of some of the biggest challenges you have faced in the past or anticipate for the future, and which qualities will help you navigate those challenges. Perhaps its most important that a radiation therapist stays calm in the face of illness and stress. Many traits will serve you on your quest to treat and support patient health. Discuss 3 or 4 which do you think are the most important.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Some of the best radiation therapists I have worked with are highly knowledgeable, ready to answer any patient question. They are also incredibly empathetic and kind. I try to emulate these therapists as much as possible since I admire their approach to patient care."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"A radiation therapist should command a room so that the patient knows they are in good hands. At the same time, a talented therapist will also be warm and welcoming, to make patients who are stressed out feel like they are safe. An interest in continued education is crucial as well. I do possess these qualities, and try my best every day, to become even better at my job."
Anonymous Answer
"I think it is extremely important for a therapist to be warm and empathetic. We are seeing our patients in their worst moments, where they are feeling very scared, vulnerable, and exposed. Being knowledgeable about the treatments at hand, while being a shoulder to cry on and a hand to hold are essential qualities in cancer management. Radiation therapists also have to be quick to adapt. No working day is ever the same, and no patient is ever the same. Being quick on your feet and ready for anything thrown your way is very important."
Rachelle's Answer
These are important qualities and characteristics, indeed. Be sure to also express to the interviewer the ways in which you show empathy and warmth, showing them that you possess these qualities yourself.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
10.
Why is it important that the patient remain in the same position during each treatment?
As you know, the way you position a patient's body during treatment is one of the most vital parts of successful radiation therapy. Display to the interviewer that you understand how important it is to have precise positioning.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"It is essential for a patient to have the same positioning for each treatment so we can ensure that the area of the body requiring treatment is receiving the full impact of the radiation. I have experience assisting patients on immobilization tables, and am sure to explain to them before treatment starts, how important it is that they remain still throughout the procedure."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I understand positioning to be very important since the radiation needs to be hyper-targeted. The area of the body requiring treatment should be exposed, and areas that do not need treatment need protection. I have experience positioning patients in treatment chairs and immobilization tables. In my current role, I often use positioning accessories such as foam products, hand grips, and magnetic sandbags."
11.
What questions do you have for me?
It's always a great idea to have questions ready for the interviewer. Review the company website and other online resources to ensure the queries you have are not mundane, or redundant. The last thing an interviewer wants to hear is a list of items you could have found the answers for from merely watching a video on their company site!

Here are some sample questions:

- When would you like to have this position filled?
- How long has this role been vacant?
- Is this a replacement search or a newly created role?
- What is your favorite part about working here?
- What is the clinic's primary goal for this position in the next 12 months?
- Is there anything from my background and experience that I can clarify for you?
- What do you see as the most significant change in this industry over the past three years?
- Is there any reason why you would not hire me?

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Thank you for asking - I do have a few questions. What is top of mind when it comes to filling this role? Also, what types of career growth opportunities would follow this position? And lastly, do you have internal candidates who are also interviewing for this senior radiation therapist position?"
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I would like to ask if there is anything in my background on which you need clarification? Also, after discussing everything today, is there any particular reason why I would not be the best fit for this radiation therapist role?"
12.
How does radiation therapy affect cancer patients, from your experience?
As you know, the effects of radiation may vary from patient to patient. Share examples from patients you have seen throughout your career as a radiation therapist. If you want to elevate your answer, you can talk about what is happening inside the patient's body. If the cancer cells shrink or resist treatment, explain your perspective.

The advantages of radiation therapy include:

- Controls or stops the growth and division of cancer cells
- Treatments are fast and usually does not require a hospital stay
- Many patients feel well enough to continue their everyday life during treatment

The disadvantages of radiation therapy include:

- If cancer is advanced, you may need multiple treatments per week
- Side effects can include fatigue and nausea
- Skin reactions can occur, such as burning and itching

Rachelle's Answer #1
"From the patients that I have seen, radiation gives them a lot of hope that their cancel cells will be staved off for good. I do see some patients who are very fatigued during their treatment, which is understandable considering how hard their bodies are working, internally, to reproduce healthy cells."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Radiation therapy affects patients in a multitude of ways, and everyone will react differently. I have seen patients feel just fine, others with mild side effects such as a loss of appetite for a few hours post-treatment. Then, others who are impacted by chronic fatigue during their treatment cycle. Overall, I believe radiation therapy to be a very targeted and impactful way of fighting cancer cells."
13.
How do you show your co-workers the importance of communication in the workplace?
The interviewer would like to know that you lead by example when it comes to communication in the workplace. Breakdown of communication in a medical setting can have dire effects on the level of care your patients receive. This effect is why it is essential, as a radiation therapist, to understand that 'telling' and 'showing' are two very different things when it comes to proper communication. Give examples of how you put dialogue into action in the workplace.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I show my co-workers the importance of communication through my willingness to ask questions if I do not understand the first time. I do not pretend to know something to save face. By creating an environment where questions are encouraged, we have increased communication greatly, and have seen better results for our patients as a result."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I show my co-workers the importance of communication in the workplace simply from leading by example. I set the tone and expectations for how we should communicate by utilizing all forms of written, verbal and interpersonal communications to a tee."
Anonymous Answer
"I show my co-workers the importance of communication through my willingness to ask questions if I do not understand the first time. I do not pretend to know something to save face. By creating an environment where questions are encouraged, we have increased communication greatly, and have seen better results for our patients as a result."
Rachelle's Answer
This humble approach is very necessary, and it would be great if more people embraced it! Unique answer, and one that the interviewer should appreciate.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
14.
Tell me about a time when you had to be very careful in communicating delicate information.
Due to the nature of your job, you will need to exercise sensitive communication with your patients. Even if they seem calm and confident, understand that they may be dealing with severe forms of cancer. It might not take much to upset or worry them as they struggle to cope with a potentially life-threatening illness. Discuss how you would communicate with a patient who was about to receive disappointing news or test results.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I performed a radiation treatment on a woman with breast cancer. We noticed that as she continued with her treatment over some time, she was not showing signs of improvement. She asked me, 'How does everything look?' I didn't want to scare her with my response. So, I told her, 'Things look stable, but you may want to talk more with the oncologist to get the details. Right now we think it's a good idea to continue radiation.' It's vital that I am sensitive with my approach and delivery, at all times."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I am conscious of watching my tone, the words I use, and even mind my facial expressions while working in a patient-facing situation. Last week I had a patient who was very optimistic about her treatment. Her cancer had spread rapidly, and the prognosis was not as positive as anyone hoped - yet, she remained positive. When she asked me if I had seen a case like hers before, and what the outcome was, I said, 'I am unable to discuss other patient cases, but I can tell you that your positive attitude through your treatment is very inspiring to see. Please continue with this amazing outlook!' This way, I was able to encourage her without directing my words to her prognosis."
15.
If a patient could not sit still during treatment, what would you do?
Patients may have trouble remaining still for various reasons. Shakiness, irritability or anxiety may be a symptom of their condition or medications they may be taking. You may need to adjust them physically. You also may need to know how to talk them down if they are feeling excessively anxious or nervous. Discuss with the interviewer how you work hard to ensure patients are comfortable and still enough to proceed with their treatment.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Helping my patients to remain calm by setting a tone of warmth and care tends to make a big difference if they are nervous or fidgeting. I speak in a soothing voice when my patients are nervous, and I remind them that I'm here to help and happy to answer questions."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"If a patient could not sit still during treatment I would take the time to explain to them how vital it is that they relax and remain still. I would utilize any positioning or immobilization equipment when necessary. There have been more severe occasions where I had to put the treatment on pause and stop to talk the patient off the ledge. These situations happen more often with first-time patients."
More Interview Q&As
Explore expert tips and resources to be more confident in your next interview.
Behavioral
Common
Phone
Tough
Leadership
All Interview Topics
All Career Q&As
Suggested Career
Interview Q&As
Continue practicing by visiting these similar question sets
Dental Hygienist
Nursing
Physical Therapist
XRay Technician
30 Radiation Therapists Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Interview Questions
  1. Describe your relationship with the last physician you worked for.
  2. How do you deal with stress?
  3. How do you handle a larger than average workload?
  4. How would your coworkers describe you?
  5. When did you realize you wanted to be a radiation therapist?
  6. How would you describe your overall academic performance?
  7. Tell me about your experience training others.
  8. What are your salary expectations?
  9. What qualities should a radiation therapist have?
  10. Why is it important that the patient remain in the same position during each treatment?
  11. What questions do you have for me?
  12. How does radiation therapy affect cancer patients, from your experience?
  13. How do you show your co-workers the importance of communication in the workplace?
  14. Tell me about a time when you had to be very careful in communicating delicate information.
  15. If a patient could not sit still during treatment, what would you do?
  16. How do you deal with patients who are especially weak or run down due to chemotherapy?
  17. What does palliative treatment mean?
  18. Can you explain to me, in layman's terms, how radiation therapy kills cancer cells?
  19. If your superior incorrectly prepped and set up a patient, what would you do?
  20. How would you react if a senior therapist disagreed with your judgement or analysis of a film?
  21. What is the difference between a CT and an MRI?
  22. What do you know about our healthcare facility?
  23. What type of work environment allows you to be the most productive?
  24. If a patient isn't safely protected, what are some of the harmful effects of radiation?
  25. Cancer treatment can be complicated and confusing. How do you explain complicated concepts to those who may not understand?
  26. What would you do if the linear accelerator was not working correctly?
  27. Do you prefer to work on your own, or as a part of a team?
  28. Tell me about your experience working with radiology equipment.
  29. Have you ever dealt with a crisis on your shift? How did you react?
  30. How do you know if a patient is experiencing negative side-effects of radiation?
Disclaimer
Our interview questions and answers are created by experienced recruiters and interviewers. These questions and answers do not represent any organization, school, or company on our site. Interview questions and answer examples and any other content may be used else where on the site. We do not claim our questions will be asked in any interview you may have. Our goal is to create interview questions and answers that will best prepare you for your interview, and that means we do not want you to memorize our answers. You must create your own answers, and be prepared for any interview question in any interview.
Learn more about what we believe >
Read our Terms of Use for more information >