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Psychologist Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Heather Douglass
Updated August 17th, 2018 | Heather has over 20 years experience recruiting and hiring candidates,
specifically in the health care industry.
Job Interviews     Careers     Health    

Question 1 of 30

What kind of impact would you like to make here?

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Interview Questions

1.

What kind of impact would you like to make here?

This is a great question to turn the tables on the interviewer. Tell the interviewer that you'd like to tackle any projects they need someone to take the lead on if there is an inspection or accreditation coming up you want to be a part of it. This is your chance to ask the interviewer what they currently have in the queue to accomplish. This will give you an idea of what else the job entails.

2.

Why should we accept you over other equally qualified candidates?

This question is similar to 'tell us about yourself.' Answer this question with your 2-minute elevator speech that highlights your accomplishments and what sets you apart from the rest. Know what the job entails and what qualifications are needed. Confirm that you possess those qualifications and that you can offer more. Avoid 'hard working', 'reliable' or 'works well in a team' because anyone can claim that.

Heather's Answer

"I'm a motivated, confident and energetic person with the experience to positively contribute to the clinic."

3.

Describe some of the research projects you've been involved with.

This question is your chance to tell the interviewer what exciting projects you've been a part of. If you are a new graduate this is a great chance to tell the interviewer about research projects you took part of while in school. Tell the interviewer what the project was, what your role was, what information you gathered and what the outcome was.

Heather's Answer

"I'm currently working alongside student at the University of Las Vegas to determine if music positively effects patients suffering from TBI."

4.

What other hospitals have you applied to?

This question could be a way for you to practice your negotiation skills. If you are applying to other hospitals be sure to say so. Word travels fast when hiring managers are calling around to find out more about you. Be sure to tell the interviewer why you chose to apply for their position and why you would like this job over the others that you have applied to. Don't discuss who pays more but who can offer more opportunity and would be the best fit for you.

Here's a sample answer: "I have applied to two other hospitals in the area. The reason I applied to this position was that the position is a Child Psychologist. I have 10 years experience working with children and have enjoyed every minute of it."

Heather's Answer

"I have applied to two other hospitals in the area. The reason I applied to this position was that the position is a Child Psychologist. I have 10 years experience working with children and have enjoyed every minute of it."

5.

What is your experience with treating eating disorders?

As a Psychologist, you've been a part of a multi-disciplinary team to treat many disorders. Walk the interviewer through your treatment combination of psychological and nutritional counseling, along with medical and psychiatric monitoring. Be sure to tell the interviewer that treatment must address the eating disorder symptoms and medical consequences, as well as psychological, biological, interpersonal, and cultural forces that contribute to or maintain the eating disorder.

6.

What do you like most about being a Psychologist?

This question is a question similar to 'tell us about yourself.' This question is being asked because the interviewer wants to know more about you. Tell the interviewer how rewarding it is to directly work with people and their problems. You look forward to going to work each day because you often get the opportunity to see the results of your work.

Heather's Answer

"The best thing about being a Psychologist is learning something new every day from my coworkers and patients."

7.

Do you know anyone who works for us?

This question could play in your favor if one of your friends, their fellow employees, has good work ethic and will say a few nice things on your behalf. Be aware of the policy on relatives working for the organization. This can affect your answer even though they asked about friends, not relatives. Be careful to mention a friend only if they are well thought of. Asking that friend if you can name drop would be best so they aren't caught off guard by the interviewer.

8.

What is your availability in an emergency? If you are not available, what are my alternatives?

As a Psychologist, there will be times that you'll be on call as the emergency provider. If you've held this role before, tell the interviewer how you quickly you responded to the calls, if you were able to triage over the phone and if you met your patients at the emergency room if needed.

Heather's Answer

"In the past, I have rotated as an on-call provider. I keep a work cell phone specifically for that reason."

9.

Tell me about a problem you had with a supervisor.

Like a lot of working professionals, you may have worked with a horrible boss. Your interview is not the time to bring up your work horrors. This is a test to see if you will speak ill of your boss. If you fall for it and tell about a problem with a former boss, you might as well walk out of the interview right then. Stay positive and develop a poor memory about any trouble with a supervisor.

Heather's Answer

"There have been times that my supervisor and I didn't see eye to eye but that's alright. We both respect one another and listen to what each other​ has to say."

10.

What are your career goals?

This question is being asked to gain insight into your self-awareness and communication skills. Have a short term and long term goal in mind. Make all goals relevant to your career field. Be confident in your answers as they are your goals and no one else's.

Heather's Answer

"My short-term goal is to find a position that will put me in a forward-moving company with solid performance and future projections. My long-term goal will depend on where the company goes. My plan is to move into a position of responsibility where I can lead a team."

11.

Do you consider yourself an introvert, and extrovert, or both? Explain your answer.

If you enjoy recharging your batteries by spending time alone then you are an introvert. If you thrive by being around people and all the action then you are viewed as an extrovert. If you answer the question as being an introvert make sure you don't make it too awkward and end up not being able to work with a team. If you have been described as an extrovert than being the center of attention is what you need just be sure to sensor your answer.

12.

Are you a detail oriented person?

As a Psychologist, attention to detail is needed from charting to counseling patients. Explain your skills and use examples. Tell the interviewer about your patience, determination and proactive attitude.

Heather's Answer

"I am a detail oriented person. My attention to detail shows in my SOAP notes."

13.

What did you like most about your previous position?

As a Psychologist, what made you want to come to work each day? Was it the team that you were a part of or the excitement of a new case every day? Relay to the interviewer what you liked best and that you are excited about the opportunity to find it in the new position.

Here is an example: "At my last job I worked with a great team of professionals. I look forward to meeting the team here and build professional working relationships."

Heather's Answer

"At my last job I worked with a great team of professionals. I look forward to meeting the team here and build professional working relationships."

14.

What do you know about our facility?

This question is a test to see if you did your homework on the facility you are applying to. Once you get to the interview stage, you'll want to do further research about the facility. Start with the website, reviewing their mission, values, and culture. You can read employee reviews to see what their experience was like. Do your homework so that you can respond confidently. Strive to impress the interviewer with your knowledge. That shows you have vested interested in the facility and that you're thinking long-term.

15.

What is your greatest strength?

This is the most common interview question so don’t let this question surprise you, take the time to think about what you want to say. Read the job description and try to identify traits that the employer wants in their new hire. Have an example ready to back up your strength. If you are struggling to find your strength, ask a trusted friend or colleague what they think are your greatest strengths or go back to previous performance reviews and read over the positive feedback.

Heather's Answer

"My greatest strength is my ability to keep calm in stressful situations. Many times my patients come to me anxious and upset but I have a way of bringing them down and making our sessions beneficial."

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