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Top 25 Athletic Trainer Interview Questions

Being an athletic trainer can be a stressful position. How do you handle stress and pressure?
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Question 2 of 28
Why should we hire you to be our athletic trainer?
Professional Answers Preview
"I am the best athletic trainer for you because I come with the exact experience that you are looking for in your job posting. I have exposure being an athletic trainer to elite athletes and have additional experience working side by side with physicians."
The interviewer would like to know what makes you a stand-out candidate. Why should they choose you? Tell the interviewer all of the star qualities that make you an unforgettable candidate. If you can't think of ways that you are unique, ask a few friends or family members what they feel sets you apart from other people. Their observations may help you understand how you are perceived. Perhaps you already know what sets you apart! These stand-out qualities could include any industry accolades, exceptional achievements, additional industry related training, a second language, or how involved you are in the community. Don't be afraid to brag about yourself a bit. In an interview, you are your most influential advocate.
More Answer Examples
Entry Level Example
"I'm qualified and passionate about helping people to move and stay active. I am excited about the idea of delivering health to your athletes and will hustle for the opportunity to go above and beyond for your facility."
Experienced Example
"You should hire me because I am unlike anyone else you have interviewed before. When I started my current company, I was the youngest athletic trainer they had ever hired. That didn't stop me from becoming the #1 trainer in the company within six months. I am dedicated to my craft and engaged in this industry to the point where I commit myself to taking at least one professional development or leadership related workshop every business quarter. I am a competitive achiever. You won't be disappointed when you hire me."
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Question 3 of 28
What types of work environments are you used to?
Professional Answers Preview
"I have worked with diverse groups of people most of my career, including my time in University. I am most comfortable, and happy, in this type of environment because it offers a great learning opportunity."
As an athletic trainer, you will meet a large variety of people every day. The interviewer wants to see that you can handle working in a diverse environment. Assure the interviewer that you are capable of getting along with a variety of personalities, that you can adapt to change, and that you can make yourself comfortable in any situation.
More Answer Examples
Entry Level Example
"I would say that pretty much every company I have worked for has valued diversity. Working with people from all walks of life help shed different perspectives and identify potential problems faster."
Experienced Example
"In my career, I have treated plenty of people that range from all ages and personalities. I can easily adapt from one conversation to another. I'm a good conversationalist and comfortable enough with myself that I can easily adapt to new situations."
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Question 4 of 28
What are the general assessment steps that you take with a new patient?
Professional Answers Preview
"In my current clinic we have a detailed form that I ask all new patients to fill out, in full. It includes their details such as height, weight, and birthdate. We collect their health care details as well. Then, the form dives into medical history, allergies, current exercise levels, and previous diagnoses. Each of my new patients will then sit with me for a 30-minute consultation. All of this happens before I begin treatment."
The interviewer would like to know that you understand how to intake a new patient correctly. As an athletic trainer, you need to understand the importance of proper intake with new patients. Assure the interviewer that you are capable of following appropriate protocol and documentation.
More Answer Examples
Entry Level Example
"When I first meet a new patient, I will ensure that their paperwork is complete. I take the time to speak with them about any previous injuries and discuss their expectations surrounding my treatment plan."
Experienced Example
"I have an intake team who follows the protocols that I have set forth for them. Our intake process includes a full health questionnaire, a conversation surrounding their dietary habits, sleep habits, as well as their current exercise plan."
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Question 5 of 28
How do you respond to sudden changes in your schedule?
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Question 6 of 28
What three words would you use to describe yourself?
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Question 7 of 28
As an Athletic Trainer, what do you believe is your best asset?
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Question 8 of 28
What is your top diet or nutrition recommendation to your patients?
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Question 9 of 28
Why do you want a career as an athletic trainer?
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Question 10 of 28
What are your salary expectations?
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Question 11 of 28
When you suffer a setback with a client, how does that emotionally affect you and your work?
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Question 12 of 28
What type of physical therapy equipment are you best versed in?
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Question 13 of 28
What type of training program do you use for yourself?
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Question 14 of 28
How do you evaluate if an athlete is ready to be back in the game?
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Question 15 of 28
While attending university, what was your most challenging course, and why?
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Question 16 of 28
While attending university/college, what was your favorite course, and why?
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Question 17 of 28
In your career as an athletic trainer, have you ever come across an injury that made you queasy?
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Question 18 of 28
As an athletic trainer are you able to recognize the signs of steroid or other performance enhancement drug use?
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Question 19 of 28
Have you ever worked as part of a team with a head coach or another trainer?
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Question 20 of 28
Give me a time when you went above and beyond the basic requirements for a patient.
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Question 21 of 28
Do you prefer to work on your own, or as a part of a rehabilitation team?
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Question 22 of 28
Tell me about the most severe injury you have come across in your career as an athletic trainer.
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Question 23 of 28
Tell me about your post-secondary education and how it prepared you for a career as an athletic trainer.
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Question 24 of 28
Are you experienced in collaborating with physicians and other healthcare practitioners?
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Question 25 of 28
Have you ever developed a client training program from scratch?
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Question 26 of 28
Have you ever worked with patients who have disabilities or unique challenges?
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Question 27 of 28
Are you keen on documentation and report writing?
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Question 28 of 28
Would you say you are a better verbal or written communicator?
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User-Submitted Interview Answers

Question 1 of 28
Being an athletic trainer can be a stressful position. How do you handle stress and pressure?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I would let the stress of a situation cool down before I approached it because sometimes people say things they do not mean when under stress.
2.
I have always worked better under pressure but I have found that the best way to dealing with a stressful situation in the field of athletic training especially when it comes to dealing with an athlete is to take a step back and analysis the situation before acting.
3.
My goal is to find the best plan possible to.
4.
I would say I react to those very well due to my calm attitude. I tend to think before I react and thats a great quality to imply on the job. Reacting towards an emergency in a hasty way can end bad both ways.
5.
I can deal with it because I m really calm person.
6.
I take a second and step away from the situation to catch my breathe and use this time to stop and think about what is most urgent that can be handled quickly and efficiently.
7.
Before handling the situation, I take a mental step back and catch my breath while trying to look at the whole situation. I first ask myself what is most urgent that can be done in a timely matter? If there is something I can do immediately I do it. I sort of make a mental list of what is urgent and important but can also be done efficiently. It's always important to remain cool, calm, and collected in stressful situations.
8.
I don't really get stressed.
9.
I like to exercise to relieve stress, I also have the mental toughness to assess the situation and calm down.
10.
I handle them very well. You have to in this profession. The important thing is to always remain calm so that you can make wise decisions.
11.
Breathe, go for a walk, and deal with it immediately.
12.
I think about the outcome I want to happen and concentrate on that. I communicate with other staff members and do not hesitate to delegate help where it is needed. Keeping my cool can be difficult at times if there is an emergency or if a staff member or parent is upset about an athlete being injured, but as long as I remember my training and what steps to take, I am confident that I can handle the pressure.
13.
I work out, yoga and receive massages when I can.
14.
I react very calmly and take care of the situation as calmly as possible.
15.
I find that I tend to work better under pressure.
Question 2 of 28
Why should we hire you to be our athletic trainer?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
You should hire me because as a former athlete, I understand the risks and injuries our bodies go through on a day to day practice basis. I know how I learned how to reduce injury and get stronger every day.
2.
I get so committed to something almost nothing else matters. When I became and Athletic trainer I learned this is what I want to do. So I ended up spending everyday in the ATR not but force but by choice. And Chosing to help people is a commitment I want to make. And I feel like committing to this position feels right. When I picture my self working here I see a future a way to grow and I also see something I love to do and do daily. I see my self commiting my life to this job.
3.
I think that I possess some skills that make me a good fit for this position. I am able to adapt to my environment or situations I may encounter quickly. I am a team player, I like to think that I am generally good at establishing rapport with everyone that I may come in contact with throughout a work day, I am a good listener and motivator. I am open-minded. I am always willing to learn new skills and techniques. I am also always looking to find way to do things better and more effectively.
4.
You should hire me because I can bring a high quality of rehabilitation care to the athletes of this school to get them back to sport and keep them healthy.
5.
You should hire me because of my work ethics. I strive to be the best and one way I do this is by getting everything done and not procrastinating.
6.
You guys should hire me because I already know about athletic trainer and how it works.
7.
I am a motivated individual who has just graduated from a good kinesiology program, and I am looking to help anyone that could use my assistance whether it be physical or mental. I am hard working, I like to see that projects get done efficiently and are done as best to my ability. I also have a wide variety of experience in the field of injury prevention/assessment and treatment. Most importantly, I want to be able to help athletes reach their utmost potential, and athletic trainers help preserve athletes to do this.
8.
Because my clinical placements were with diverse teams from different divisions giving me a well-rounded experience.
9.
I think that I will work well with the other Trainer, I have a strong work ethic and am not afraid to put in hours. I am professional, yet personal.
10.
I am the best fit for the position.
11.
I was lucky enough to find a career I'm passionate about at a young age. When I work, I don't have the miserable feeling of 'ugh I'm going to work'. I'll be working and I find myself needing to remind myself that I'm working, due to how much I enjoy it. Puzzles have always been a source of fun for me, so evaluating injuries is a giant puzzle and I don't only want to solve the puzzle, I want to look at the whole picture. People enjoy being around me, and I enjoy people. I work great with others and alone. I'd make an excellent addition to your athletic training team.
12.
I'm passionate about athletic training and excited to learn new things and I can bring that everyday to the athletic training room to help my athletes stay in good help and get better when they need to.
13.
I go find something to laugh at, laughter is a great destresser.
14.
I'm driven, passionate and motivated. I love sports and helping people.
15.
I strive in pressure and I have worked in many different collegiate surrounding.
Question 3 of 28
What types of work environments are you used to?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Every semester I had to change placements and get acquainted with new people, situations and environments.
2.
I grew up in a small town with 200 students in a graduating class to a college like Penn State where I knew no one and learned to make new friends easily. I've been to many summer camps in my youth where I would be alone and have to adapt to make the best of it. I had to make a bad living situation my sophomore year into a decent one by eventually just having to move out but we tried to work it out.
3.
I have worked in a very diverse school system and have spoken to athletes and parents whose first language was not English. I worked with my home university and a university where many of the athletes were from South America and did not speak much English, so I did their treatment each day in Spanish. I feel that it helped them comply with treatment and feel more confident that they could overcome their injuries. I have also had football games where the field turned to mush and all the players were slipping and falling and becoming injured. I was able to encourage them, saying that it would only be another hour until we headed home, and that because we were ahead something good would come of the rainy, miserable night.
Question 4 of 28
What are the general assessment steps that you take with a new patient?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I like to look at the problem from different points of view and figure out what the possible outcomes could be before making a final decision.
2.
The steps I would follow are to first try and understand how the problem arose, such as a communication issue, injury mechanism, etc. Then take the necessary actions to calm the situation down and take care of what needs to be taken care of.
3.
I stay calm and think of all the possible scenarios before making a decision.
4.
Investigate, so I do my research, I ask other individuals with the same education as I do as to how they would handle it, find someone who I know has had a similar problem and ask how they solved it. Then I apply the information I have gathered and apply it to my own beliefs and make a decision about what would most benefit the program or individuals.
5.
I try to see all sides of the situation or problem first to try to make the best decision possible. I'm not afraid to ask for help if I think I need it and I think getting advice can greatly help solve a problem that I might think is impossible.
6.
Breath, assess emergency situations, weigh options.
7.
Eliminate dangers to the patient, Recognize the goal of my decision making, Think about past experiences and outcomes, Decide which approach is most appropriate and who is the most appropriate person to contact in regards to the problem.
Question 5 of 28
How do you respond to sudden changes in your schedule?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Just over a year ago I was finishing my second year working as an athletic trainer at a college, with volleyball and softball specifically. We had a team of 5 and I knew my athletes well. I did all my own rehabs and treatments with my athletes. When I got my current job at a high school, I had to quickly adapt to taking care of a wide range of athletes, learning how to talk to parents, and learning how to refer injuries out for physical therapy.
2.
Within my clinical education I have had to adapt many times. Whether it was switching to a new clinical site or changes made within the practices of athletic trainers from what I learned one year to the next. Also, having to adapt to practice location changes due to inclement weather or a game getting cancelled so now the team was going to have practice.
3.
The most prominant situation I can think of was an injury (broken leg) that I had to take care of in an environment where I had none of the tools I needed to work with. I was able to act quickly and think outside the box to make sure that person was as safe and as comfortable as possible while I splinted the leg and transported them to the hospital.
4.
There's been a lot of times when practice times or fields changed from what was scheduled so I had to be flexible.
5.
At a party a dude overdosed on oxy and I had to give him water.
6.
Weather changed schedule.
7.
Starting in the undergraduate program was a tough transition but I quickly learned to adapt to the new lifestyle of balancing school and training room and my social life.
8.
When I was working with a baseball team I had to.
9.
In my first clinical rotation, I was used to shadowing at the university with the same team every day and only shadowed home games. My second rotation was at another college, but the home games required a 15 minute drive to an off-campus field location and swim meet locations. I was responsible for providing treatment to the home team and the visiting team at all games and extracurricular events such as 5k runs, as well as practicing counseling for athletes with my preceptor. My last 3 rotations were at high schools. I had to treat a variety of athletes and communicate with their parents as well as coaches. Schedules changed a lot more often, games were postponed or cancelled, giving me more or less time to tend to injured athletes, and at times I was required to accompany athletes to physical therapy, shadowing the physical therapist to observe all aspects of the athlete's recovery. I have also been in situations where my preceptor's modalities were damaged at the beginning of the season, so I had to ask my professor to let me loan an ultrasound/estim unit for the semester so I could have hands-on practice and benefit my athletes at the same time.
Question 6 of 28
What three words would you use to describe yourself?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Professional dedicated responsible.
Question 7 of 28
As an Athletic Trainer, what do you believe is your best asset?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I always act professional and stay calm.
2.
I think my best asset as an athletic trainer is how quickly I learn new techniques and how eager I am to learn and try new things.
3.
My ability to think quickly on my feet about how to preserve my athlete's well being.
Question 8 of 28
What is your top diet or nutrition recommendation to your patients?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I covered a high school rugby game where there were a lot of pretty serious injuries. First, I had an obviously broken ankle on the opposing team; fortunately family friends were there that were able to take him right to the hospital. Then, I had two kids collide and both sustain concussions. One lost consciousness so I had to triage; I called an ambulance for the kid that lost consciousness and then evaluated the other kid when the first was taken care of.
2.
When I was born I had to decide wether to breath or just die.
3.
At a summer soccer camp we had a girl go down after getting kicked in the back of the neck and we made the decision to spine board her and call 911. It all happened in less than 2 minutes.
4.
At a college lacrosse tournament, a player was tackled in front of me close to the sideline. He lay on the ground clutching his shoulder. My preceptor was on the other side of the field helping someone else. I helped the athlete onto the bench and immediately noted a gross deformity medial to his shoulder. I asked the athlete if he could lift his arm and he could not. I called my preceptor and told her I suspected a clavicular fracture and that I had gotten the sling and ace bandage ready for her to stabilize the athlete's arm, while instructing the athlete to keep the position of his arm close to his body. After my preceptor put the sling on and had returned to her task across the field, the athlete's arm slipped down out of the bandage that was holding it, causing him more pain. I had to re-stabilize the athlete's arm and wrap it more securely myself. I then talked to the coach, suggesting that the athlete go to the nearest hospital immediately. The coach argued that since the team was out of state, he wanted to wait two days to go back to their home state before taking the athlete to the hospital. I told the athlete and the coach that they should go to the hospital as soon as possible to rule out complications and get an x-ray, because we wanted to get him better as soon as possible. Finally, because I was assertive, the coach made the decision for someone to drive him to the hospital.
Question 9 of 28
Why do you want a career as an athletic trainer?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I knew that I never wanted a 9-5 career where I was stuck at a desk all day with little interaction with people. I love being outside and I love sports, and I knew I wanted a job where I had the chance to help and better someone every day.
2.
I find working with athletes rewarding because they want to do what they do. They put their minds and bodies through so much for their sport and I think working with them and helping them achieve that goal is so satisfying. I always knew a career in the health field was something I wanted to pursue and working around sports is a great combination of my passions.
3.
I want to provide prophylactic and rehabilitative care for athletes to help them become stronger as they overcome their injuries, but moreover, I want to make a difference in the lives of the young people I help by showing them that there can be a reliable and caring person who is always there for them, no matter what their personal situation may be. I value the athletic training career as a way of life, a way to help others and be part of a team and a family while broadening my knowledge of orthopedics at the same time.
Question 10 of 28
What are your salary expectations?
Question 11 of 28
When you suffer a setback with a client, how does that emotionally affect you and your work?
Question 12 of 28
What type of physical therapy equipment are you best versed in?
Question 13 of 28
What type of training program do you use for yourself?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I do not exercise as much as I should, but when I do, I begin with a light aerobic warmup before strength-power exercises, choosing full body exercises and keeping the weight light but performing 20 or more repetitions to achieve hypertrophy. For my aerobic workouts, I find a quiet park with running trails and run 2 miles at a steady pace, walk to the soccer field, and complete 8 laps of interval training by running half a lap at a sprinting pace and then walking the other half. I cool down by doing walking lunges up the steep hill to where I park my car.
Question 14 of 28
How do you evaluate if an athlete is ready to be back in the game?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
In my state, ATCs are not allowed to make the return to play decision. I will first ask the advice of the team physician and communicate the athlete's symptoms and my findings to come to a concensus, so that I understand the additional rehabilitation that my athlete must undertake before the physician gives me permission to allow the athlete to return to play.
Question 15 of 28
While attending university, what was your most challenging course, and why?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Biomechanics was the most challenging course because I had not taken physics or calculus and it contained a lot of those elements. Whereas all of the other course curriculums contained a practicum section, Biomechanics was situational and mathematical. There was a disconnect for me between the actual application of the forces of the body we were learning about and the way I would imagine an athlete going through the motions described in the math problems. I also did not understand why calculating how fast a boat will travel across a river was so important. Many of the math problems did not pertain to real-world examples in sports medicine. The teacher lost me, talking way over my head even during help sessions, and I believe I could have done better if I had found a way to apply each problem to sports medicine and rehab principles. This is why I feel that I should study Biomechanics in greater detail if I go on to complete a Master's degree.
Question 16 of 28
While attending university/college, what was your favorite course, and why?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
General Medical Conditions of the Athlete. I love medicine, and differential diagnosis of non-orthopedic illnesses comes easily to me. I also love orthopedic and osteopathic medicine, but I had to study a lot harder in those classes than in Gen Med because it is like second nature.
Question 17 of 28
In your career as an athletic trainer, have you ever come across an injury that made you queasy?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
When a male athlete was hit in the groin area during a wrestling match, although I am familiar with injuries to male anatomy, I decided to have the male coach accompany the athlete to the locker room, telling the coach to ask the athlete specific questions about his injury and that the athlete should perform a self-examination and report back to the coach. I then asked if everything was ok, and the coach reported that the athlete was ok, just sore. He was able to walk it off and get back in the match. It did not make me queasy, as it is just anatomy, but I am female, so I did not want the male student to feel uncomfortable with a female handling the questions. There was an athlete who was inappropriate toward me and the other females. When the athlete attempted to make physical contact with me in a way that made me uncomfortable (trying to hug me, in a way that was not innocent or appropriate), moving away from him, I immediately turned to my preceptor, and in front of the athlete, stated plainly that I would not provide treatment or taping for him unless my preceptor was in the room supervising at all times. Although the athlete did not leave me alone after that, my preceptor was able to correct him when he made me uncomfortable.
Question 18 of 28
As an athletic trainer are you able to recognize the signs of steroid or other performance enhancement drug use?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Yes. The male athlete is usually overly irritable, violent, and aggressive toward others while withdrawing from the group and becoming more introverted. Hair loss, voice deepening, gynecomastia, shrinking of genitals, excessive muscle gain inconsistent with workout intensity, insomnia, and inability to fight common infections are common symptoms of steroid use.
Question 19 of 28
Have you ever worked as part of a team with a head coach or another trainer?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Yes, my preceptors and I worked sports events with a system where we would run out on the field and perform the primary assessment, and by the time the ATC arrived with the kit, we could report initial findings and tell how we would proceed. I also worked events where I was responsible for communicating with the coaches while my preceptor supervised, but I had to act on my own and then take corrections from my preceptor.
Question 20 of 28
Give me a time when you went above and beyond the basic requirements for a patient.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I made a noose and instead of just showing it, I used it ;)
2.
This girl at the high school had lower back problems and my preceptors wanted me to write up her rehab. Well I didn't really have much experience with back injuries except in class but this girl was very determined to get back and wanted to try anything so with the help of my preceptors I researched every rehab exercise we could do and other alternative ways to help her.
3.
When one of the football players who did not have many resources at home tore his ACL, I provided treatment for him after surgery to mobilize tissue and begin the range of motion phase of his rehab. When he was ready for physical therapy one week later, I accompanied him to each session, noting his progress and providing information to his guardian about how his scar should be healing and how to clean it. With proper patient education and guardian cooperation, he was able to begin football the next year stronger than he had been before.
Question 21 of 28
Do you prefer to work on your own, or as a part of a rehabilitation team?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I work very well with other people. I've been on sports teams since I could kick a soccer ball and being apart of a team is something I enjoy a lot.
2.
I can always learn new material or treatment techniques from other trainers who have more experience, and working with others is a great way to network and meet other professionals within the NATA. I enjoy being part of a team and feel that working together increases the efficiency of treatment, opportunity for delegation in handling emergency situations, and the enjoyment of the sporting event.
Question 22 of 28
Tell me about the most severe injury you have come across in your career as an athletic trainer.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
During a football game, there were 2 ATCs, 3 intern student trainers, and a team manager, who was a student, but was trained in basic level EMS services. The star running back was tackled and motionless on the ground in fencing posture. Two ATCs, one intern, and the manager ran onto the field. The manager was not supposed to but the hurt kid was her friend so she thought it was ok. The athlete was unconscious during primary assessment but responded to pain and reported painful tingling and numbness in his extremities and his neck, and could not move his extremities. I was calling 911 and reporting the incident to EMS. The kid's mom was trying to run onto the field, hysterical, and the coaches were trying to keep her back but were yelling and cussing at the referees that the kid responsible for hurting him should be suspended from play. The intern got angry at the manager, who was trying to help spine board the athlete, but she was getting in the way, and was asked to leave by one of the ATCs, so I had to step in and try to keep everyone calm while handling the athlete with care. We got him loaded on a gurney and he had to be life flighted to the hospital because the EMTs suspected cerebral edema. He was diagnosed with a severe concussion but did not require surgery. He recovered and was cleared a month later.
Question 23 of 28
Tell me about your post-secondary education and how it prepared you for a career as an athletic trainer.
Question 24 of 28
Are you experienced in collaborating with physicians and other healthcare practitioners?
Question 25 of 28
Have you ever developed a client training program from scratch?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Yes, I took an Exercise Prescription and Strength and Conditioning class, in which I learned to create workout and training programs for individual clients based on their needs and state of physical fitness.
Question 26 of 28
Have you ever worked with patients who have disabilities or unique challenges?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I have not worked with Special Olympics teams or students with intellectual disabilities, but I have worked with students who have physical disabilities, Asperger's Syndrome, and Autism. I have found that these students require more emotional support and are not comfortable sharing symptoms, often times hiding pain and discomfort until the injury becomes more severe.
Question 27 of 28
Are you keen on documentation and report writing?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Yes, I am comfortable writing daily clinical logs, gathering contact information, writing SOAP notes and referrals to the Physical Therapy clinic and team physician, and creating follow up reports on therapy and/or rehabilitation progress to send home with athletes and parents.
Question 28 of 28
Would you say you are a better verbal or written communicator?

About Athletic Trainer

January 28th, 2017

Career options for an athletic trainer are vast. An athletic trainer can work on a multitude of patients ranging from the general public in need of physical rehabilitation to amateur and professional athletes. An athletic trainer can work in a hospital setting, a rehabilitation clinic, a school/university, for a particular sports team, or for the military.

The tasks of an athletic trainer vary greatly and they include tending to minor injuries such as twists and sprains. An athletic trainer will properly fit the athlete to their athletic equipment and ensure that any physician recommended regimes are followed by the individual in their care. If the athletic trainer is working for a sports team, they are required to be present for every game, practice, and training session.

Athletic trainers should be strong and fit as they will be required to assist, and be an example to, their patients and athletes. This includes heavy lifting, supporting another persons weight from time to time and giving exercise demonstrations. This is a physically demanding career.

If an athletic trainer is working for a sports team they may be required to give presentations and training in regards to the dangers of performance enhancing drugs and other forms of drug and alcohol abuse.

An athletic trainer is considered a healthcare professional so a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in a health related field is required for most positions. In addition to a Bachelor's Degree, most states have their own licensing requirements for athletic trainers.

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