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Urologists Interview
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29 Questions and Answers by Darby Faubion
Updated November 19th, 2018 | Darby Faubion has been a Nurse and Allied Health Educator for over twenty years. She has clinical experience in several specialty areas including pediatrics, medical-surgical, critical care, and hospice.
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Question 1 of 29

Do you have experience working with peers from diverse backgrounds?

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1.

Do you have experience working with peers from diverse backgrounds?

In an industry as large as healthcare, diversity among peers is inevitable. To be successful, it is crucial to learn how to work with a diverse group of people. Some people are intimidated when faced with learning new cultures and beliefs, but in the healthcare industry, it is crucial to provide effective care. The interviewer wants to know that you are open to meeting and learning about new people and becoming an integral part of the team. Be positive with your response.

Darby's Answer #1

"The diversity of specialty areas is something I love about the healthcare field. I like the idea of being in a career that challenges me to learn and grow. I believe we all have something that we can contribute to others and I like to embrace the diversity among those that I work with."

Darby's Answer #2

"The largest diverse group I worked with was probably when I did my clinical rotation at University Medical Center. I was afforded the opportunity to meet people from different cultures, religions, and professional backgrounds. It gave me an eye-opening experience of how many wonderful people there are!"

2.

As an urologist, you will often have to deliver discouraging news to patients and their families. How do you handle such hardsituations?

Delivering discouraging news can be difficult for any healthcare provider. The interviewer is not expecting you to react as though you are resilient to all difficult situations. Rather, he wants to know that you can get the job done while being compassionate.

Darby's Answer #1

"Delivering bad news is hard. I always try to be soft-spoken and give the patient and their families time to ask questions. It's important to me to always try to remember that one day I may be the one receiving bad news and to treat those, that I am caring for, the way I would like to be treated."

Darby's Answer #2

"I always try to schedule enough time to spend with the patient and family so that they can talk to one another and with me. Helping them process the news is often a way for me to cope, as well."

3.

Do you anticipate any significant changes in your life within the next 2-3 years that may prevent you from continuing employment here if you are offered a position here?

Knowing what goals you have and any changes you anticipate in your life will give the interviewer an opportunity to evaluate two things: 1. what positions are available that won't disrupt your plans, and 2. are you interested in having a long-term relationship within the company? Either way, being upfront and honest is always appreciated.

Darby's Answer #1

"I recently became engaged. Although we have not set a date yet, we have agreed to wait twelve months before the marriage. My fiance? just passed the Bar exam here and has been offered an opportunity to join an existing law firm. Presently, our plans are to stay where we are and build a career, not just work a job. Also, we do not plan on having children for at least two years after our marriage. We both feel that being able to become established in our careers and save for our future would be the responsible thing to do before starting a family."

Darby's Answer #2

"My goal is to find a position that will allow me to work long term. I do not anticipate any significant changes that would affect that. I have family that live nearby and close ties to the community."

4.

What would you describe as your biggest weakness?

This is probably one of the most dreaded questions in a job interview. Answering this question requires self evaluation and honesty. Remember, whatever weakness you decide to share, make sure it is not a key characteristic needed to perform your job as a phlebotomist.

Darby's Answer #1

"I think one of my biggest weaknesses is that I can get sidetracked easily. I recognize that in myself and have made a conscious effort to plan my day as much as possible and to stay on target."

Darby's Answer #2

"My biggest weakness has to be that I take on too many projects at once. While being involved and participating in various things is fun and can be good for a person, I tend to take on several things and then leave some projects unfinished. I have begun to limit myself to only taking on a few projects at a time so that I can devote the necessary time to staying on task."

5.

Salary is often commensurate with experience. How do you feel about someone with more experience than you having a higher salary but doing the same job?

Most employers do offer higher salary incentives to get more seasoned employees. This is not meant to devalue a person's knowledge or experience, but rather paying for more experience. It is important to note that the interviewer is not saying you will definitely make less than someone with more experience. Many times this question is to see how you respond and how badly you want a position. If an employee is willing to put in the work and earn the pay increase, employers often see them as someone worth investing in. This is a good time to ask what the beginning salary is and discuss options that are negotiable such as benefits and paid time off.

Darby's Answer #1

"I realize that salaries are often determined by the amount of experience an applicant has. I appreciate the fact that employers recognize experience as a factor in determining pay and am willing to show that I am worthy."

Darby's Answer #2

"I don't have a problem with someone who has more experience than me making a higher salary. I respect the experience that others have and know that I will have to prove myself."

6.

When did you first decide to become a physician and why?

Understanding what drove you to become a physician speaks volumes to the interviewer. The interviewer knows that you are dedicated or you wouldn't have gone to medical school and then moved on to specialty training. Share your personal thoughts with the interviewer.

Darby's Answer #1

"I came from a family of educators and was initially an education major in college. Through some friends, I joined a community service fraternity and discovered how much I enjoyed helping people. During that same time period, both of my grandparents were diagnosed with cancer and our whole family was very active in their care. My grandfather's oncologist became a close and influential role model for me during those early years. It was this combination of personal experiences, and the utility of applying science and technology to help people, which transformed my career aspirations."

Darby's Answer #2

"From the time I was in junior high school, all I could think of was growing up and becoming a doctor. My best friend's dad was a family practitioner and I remember that even at a young age I loved to talk to him. He made me feel like I could be the best doctor ever. I have always remembered him and his genuine personality and optimism."

7.

Why did you choose to specialize in urology?

The interviewer wants to get to know you as a person and what interests you. If something happened in your life that led you to a medical career, this is a good time to share that experience.

Darby's Answer #1

"The quick answer is that it is the only rotation I really enjoyed during third year. I had good experiences and good teachers on every other rotation too, but urology just felt right, in large part because of the urologists I met."

Darby's Answer #2

"Urologists have a reputation as easy going and happy people. We also have a pretty well-developed sense of humor, which is helpful when addressing sensitive issues like sexual function and urination."

8.

Has there ever been a time that you had a disagreement with a co-worker, and if so, how was it resolved?

Any time you work with someone else, there is a chance of having a disagreement about something at one time or another. The interviewer knows this. It's human nature for people to have their own opinions. What is important to the interviewer in this question is whether or not you are willing to compromise and work through difficult situations with your co-workers. Being unwilling to compromise or find alternative solutions to a dispute can affect everyone on the team, even if it is indirectly. Sharing a personal experience is OK, but do not embellish it to 'be the hero.'

Darby's Answer #1

"I believe if we think about it, each of us could remember at least one disagreement with a friend or co-worker. Although I consider myself to be pretty easy-going, I am also very passionate about my patients and the care that they receive. I have been aware of disagreements between other co-workers, but really like to think of myself as more of a peacekeeper. I feel like professional people should be able to discuss things logically and come to an agreement that is satisfactory for everyone involved."

Darby's Answer #2

"I am usually a very soft-spoken person and strive to be the 'peacekeeper.' I can't recall any specific incident of a disagreement."

9.

What can you tell me about bladder cancer?

Urologists are expected to understand and identity many disorders of the urinary system. One of the hardest diagnosis to have to tell a patient is bladder cancer. When sharing your knowledge with the interviewer, tell facts, but also feel free to give an example of a patient you had with this disease.

Darby's Answer #1

"Bladder cancer begins in the cells that line the inside of the bladder. Although it typically affects older adults, it can occur at any age. Smoking is the #1 risk factor for the development of bladder cancer."

Darby's Answer #2

"Bladder cancer often causes painless hematuria. This can present as bright red or cola colored urine but can also appear on a microscopic examination of the urine."

10.

What education would you provide to a patient regarding urinary tract infections?

Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common. However, many times they can easily be prevented with proper education. Identifying risk factors for infection, instructing on preventive measures, and quick treatment can help ease the symptoms of and help resolve UTIs.

Darby's Answer #1

"Urinary tract infections don't always cause signs and symptoms, but when they do they may include a strong, persistent urge to urinate, or a burning sensation when urinating. Fever may be present along with abdominal pain."

Darby's Answer #2

"Urinary tract infections are more common in women and girls than in males. Teaching female patients proper cleaning techniques, such as wiping from front to back after urination, helps reduce the risk of spreading bacteria from the rectum or vagina into the urethra which can then enter the bladder and cause infection. Drinking plenty of water and avoiding carbonated drinks is also helpful to flush the kidneys and bladder of waste products."

11.

If you were the person responsible for hiring new employees, what qualities would you look for in a candidate, and do you think you possess those qualities?

There is more than one reason for asking this question. First, the interviewer wants to know what qualities you think are important to perform this job. Second, and most importantly, your answer will tell the interviewer if you hold yourself to the same standard as you do others. If you want to see certain characteristics in your peers, you should be able to tell the interviewer with confidence that you possess those traits, as well. This question is one that interviewers often use to distinguish sincerity on the part of the candidate.

Darby's Answer #1

"I believe that honesty is important no matter what job title a person holds. I have found that being honest with people creates an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. Those qualities, I feel, are essential when building rapport with patients and co-workers."

Darby's Answer #2

"If I were hiring someone, I would look for someone who is passionate about the job and about patient care. I also feel that being approachable and willing to learn is very important."

12.

What is your greatest fear about being a doctor?

We all have things that make us feel afraid from time to time. Recognizing them is the first step in overcoming them. This question is an opportunity for the interviewer to get to know you on a personal level. Being willing to talk openly to someone about things like this shows your softer side, which is important when you are trying to build a good rapport during an interview.

Darby's Answer #1

"My greatest fear about being a doctor is that I am not learning and
Growing fast enough to save more people. I know that we can't heal or save everyone, but as a doctor, I want to give everything that I can to those who trust me with their care."

Darby's Answer #2

"I think we all fear something on one level or another. For me, I fear that I may miss something when I am treating a patient. We all have a main objective to find the source of a problem and treat our patients with care. I always want to go home at the end of my day knowing that I gave everything I could to improve the life of someone else."

13.

What characteristics do you think are important for healthcare professional?

There is more than one reason for asking this question. First, the interviewer wants to know what qualities you think are important to perform this job. Second, and most importantly, your answer will tell the interviewer if you hold yourself to the same standard as you do others. If you want to see certain characteristics in your peers, you should be able to tell the interviewer with confidence that you possess those traits, as well. This question is one that interviewers often use to distinguish sincerity on the part of the candidate.

Darby's Answer #1

"I believe that honesty is important no matter what job title a person holds. I have found that being honest with people creates an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. Those qualities, I feel, are essential when building rapport with patients and co-workers."

Darby's Answer #2

"Confidence is one thing I think is important. It's hard to believe in someone who doesn't believe in themselves. I believe if a patient is comfortable with a provider's ability to perform it will make following a plan of care easier."

14.

Are you comfortable giving presentations in front of large groups of people?

While you may not be asked to give presentations to large groups of people, there may be an opportunity to speak at seminars. Also, being comfortable with large groups or speaking could give you an opportunity to lecture or mentor others.

Darby's Answer #1

"I am comfortable with speaking to large groups. I am a people person and enjoy getting to know others. I have participated in a few urology seminars and have been a guest speaker at my former medical school."

Darby's Answer #2

"I believe I would be comfortable speaking to large groups. I have not spoken to large groups professionally, but I would enjoy the opportunity."

15.

Have you ever considered choosing a different specialty?

Many employee candidates are unsure of how to answer this question. Most feel that if they say they may have other interests that the interviewer will not recommend them for employment. This is not necessarily the case. This is simply an opportunity for the interviewer to get to know your interests.

Darby's Answer #1

"I have never considered any specialty other than urology. From the time I decided to go to medical school I knew I wanted to be a Urologist. I am happy to take classes and continue my education, perhaps for an advanced degree that may go hand in hand with current role, but I am not interested in changing my specialty."

Darby's Answer #2

"Actually, I had initially thought that I would become a gynecologist. Something about urology was just very intriguing to me and I knew I wanted to make a career in this specialty area."

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29 Urologists Interview Questions
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Interview Questions

  1. Do you have experience working with peers from diverse backgrounds?
  2. As an urologist, you will often have to deliver discouraging news to patients and their families. How do you handle such hardsituations?
  3. Do you anticipate any significant changes in your life within the next 2-3 years that may prevent you from continuing employment here if you are offered a position here?
  4. What would you describe as your biggest weakness?
  5. Salary is often commensurate with experience. How do you feel about someone with more experience than you having a higher salary but doing the same job?
  6. When did you first decide to become a physician and why?
  7. Why did you choose to specialize in urology?
  8. Has there ever been a time that you had a disagreement with a co-worker, and if so, how was it resolved?
  9. What can you tell me about bladder cancer?
  10. What education would you provide to a patient regarding urinary tract infections?
  11. If you were the person responsible for hiring new employees, what qualities would you look for in a candidate, and do you think you possess those qualities?
  12. What is your greatest fear about being a doctor?
  13. What characteristics do you think are important for healthcare professional?
  14. Are you comfortable giving presentations in front of large groups of people?
  15. Have you ever considered choosing a different specialty?
  16. Tell me about a time you were trusted with confidential information regarding a patient's care.
  17. What is a rather common urinary problem that men experience?
  18. Tell me a problem with a patient where you may have been misinformed about the patient's symptoms and had to re-evaluate a care plan or a time that a patient was afraid of treatment and had to be educated further before following through with care.
  19. What makes you feel you will be a good fit for our organization?
  20. What is a possible downside to getting a penile implant?
  21. Do you feel like you have strong relationship building skills?
  22. How would your subordinates describe you?
  23. What advice would you give students who are considering pursuing a career in urology?
  24. Urologists at our facility often work on rotation. Are you willing to work, nights, weekends, holidays, or overtime if needed?
  25. What do you like most about being a urologist?
  26. Have you ever been accused of malpractice?
  27. Do you participate in any outreach or volunteer work?
  28. In your opinion, what are some of the biggest problems in healthcare today?
  29. In your position now, knowing what you do, what would you say to someone who is just now starting a medical career?
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