Interviews Questions by Career
Interviews Questions by Company
Interviews Questions by Topic
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Youth Program Director Interview
Questions

25 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated December 2nd, 2019 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Job Interviews     Careers     Management    
Question 1 of 25
Describe a situation where you had to make a quick decision.
View Answer
How to Answer
When working with youth there are going to be unexpected emergencies that you'll need to act fast during. The interviewer wants to know about a time that you had a deal with an emergency while working.

You don't have to have a huge rescue story for the interviewer, as long as you give them an example of a time that you were under pressure and had to make a quick decision. If you don't have an example of one while working with youth, you can also talk about a time with a different emergency from your personal life.
1000s of Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Answer Examples
1.
Describe a situation where you had to make a quick decision.
When working with youth there are going to be unexpected emergencies that you'll need to act fast during. The interviewer wants to know about a time that you had a deal with an emergency while working.

You don't have to have a huge rescue story for the interviewer, as long as you give them an example of a time that you were under pressure and had to make a quick decision. If you don't have an example of one while working with youth, you can also talk about a time with a different emergency from your personal life.

Rachelle's Answer
"I was the lead for a group of children that were inside when a fire alarm went off. The other groups were all outside for recess at the time, so I had to lead my students outside to meet the rest of the students. We had no prior knowledge that a drill was going to happen, so it was the first time I had experience getting the students out by myself."
2.
How do you handle stress and pressure?
The interviewer doesn't expect you to answer this by saying that you never get stressed out or that the job isn't stressful. Working with youth can be stressful and pressure can build up on staff members- that is going to happen. The interviewer wants to know what ways you use to handle the stress.

It is important to remember as a director you'll also be handling your employee's stress alongside your own. Working with youth is all about teamwork- if the team is always stressed out that can create a negative working environment. Acknowledge that there will be stress but also explain how you'll be able to address the stress.

Rachelle's Answer
"I've been working with youth for a few years now and I understand that it can be stressful. There is always something new every single day with youth, which is part of what keeps me coming back- the youth make keep me on your toes. I believe that teamwork is the best way to help each other handle stress working. I also believe that it is important for people to work together but also not to be afraid to ask for help."
3.
Ten years from now, where do you see yourself?
The interviewer wants to know that you aren't just going to stick around for a little bit and want to make sure you have plans to stay. This isn't a trap question, no one is expecting you to say that you plan on working for their center till the end of your career. If you have hopes to grow further with the company, feel free to share that because that will show commitment. Don't lie to the interviewer if that is not what you want though.

If you don't know where you see yourself in ten years, you can talk about different opportunities for growth that you are looking into. For example, different trainings that are available for yourself- there are many different training opportunities that you can find online in your state; research a few prior to your interview.

Rachelle's Answer
"I don't see myself in a certain position per say in ten years. I see myself continuing to make a difference in the lives of children. I have looked into a few different training opportunities that would be beneficial to help myself grow."
4.
How would a past employee or coworker describe you?
The interviewer wants you to think about how your past employees or coworkers see you, if you haven't done this before it is a great way to try to see things through a different perspective. For this question think about a few qualities you want to have as a team member and then think if you believe your coworkers/employees would see you that way, if yes explain why to the interviewer- if not it would be best to pick another quality.

There is no right answer for this question as long as you back up your answer with why you believe people would describe you with those qualities. Pick one or two qualities to talk about to the interviewer.

Rachelle's Answer
"I believe my past coworkers would describe as caring and reliable. I always came to work a little bit early to make sure everything was set up and would help cover shifts when needed. I believe they would call me caring because I would always check on my coworkers when things weren't going well to see what I could do to help."
5.
What is your greatest strength? How does it help you as a Youth Program Director?
This question doesn't have one correct answer; think about a few qualities that you believe are your strengths. Once you two or three, think of an example for each of them. You don't have to talk about all of the qualities you came up with, pick the one with the best example and use that for your answer.

The interviewer wants you to brag a little about yourself here and talk about what you'll bring to the center. You don't need to go over the top, but talk about something that makes you proud.

Rachelle's Answer
"I think my greatest strength is being approachable, it is very important for youth to be comfortable going to an adult when they need help with something. Also, being approachable is important for staff and parents/guardians to feel comfortable coming to me with any issues or concerns."
6.
Have you ever had to fire anyone? How did you feel about that?
Letting people go is never an easy task. The interviewer wants to know about your experience with this, because it can be emotional and hard. It's okay if you haven't had to let someone go, but you should acknowledge the difficulties of the task to the interviewer.

As for the second part of the question, the interviewer wants to know that even if the task is difficult, you'll be able to do it if needed.

Rachelle's Answer
"I have had to fire employees before. It is never easy, but there is always evidence and prior meetings with the employee before. If someone isn't doing their job up to the standards, I sit down with them and create a plan. After time I have had to fire someone it hasn't been a surprise to the employee."
7.
How do you communicate with parents and guardians?
When working with youth you must remember that generally they won't tell their parents or guardians the information they need to know, so it is the staff's job to keep them informed. There are many different ways to communicate to parents/guardians- the most common way is verbally. It is important to remember that everyone has busy lives and you may want to have a back up to remind them of the information you need them to remember.

There are tons of different ways to communicate with families- newsletter (paper or email), texting, apps, mail, etc. The interviewer doesn't need to hear about all the different ways that you reach out, but they want to know that you have more than one way to reach the family.

Rachelle's Answer
"Even as a director, I like to see each family at least once a week to check in with them, which isn't always possible depending on the size of the center. I also have made a monthly newsletter at my past center, I would have any updates on it and also upcoming events for the month. I've also heard center using apps to keep in touch with families as well, but I haven't used it before."
8.
What techniques do you use to find the right person to hire?
As the Director of a Youth Program, you will need to insure that you are at full staff all the time. People leave jobs all the time, so you'll need to be prepared to hire a new person as soon as possible. If you haven't hired someone before, don't worry, you can talk about the different ways you've found a job before. You can also ask about the different ways that the interviewer has found people, you can state that you are open to new ideas as well.

There are so many job sites now for employees and also employers, but sometimes those are always the best way to find the right person. So, talk about face to face opportunities as well, like career fairs for example.

Rachelle's Answer
"I haven't hired anyone yet, but from my personal experience I have used job sites and gone to job fairs. Another way I've seen people hired is word of mouth from current employees, when you're employees feel they are respected and treated fair they are more likely to recommend other people to work there."
9.
How do you keep track of work so that it gets done on time?
There is going to be a lot of work to get done and a lot of people to keep track of- staff, youth, parents, etc. The interviewer wants to know what ways you have that will keep you organized. There are many different ways people keep organized to make sure work gets done on time, so there is not really a wrong answer here unless you tell the interviewer that you aren't organized.

Talk about ways that you've been organized in the past. A few different ways people stay organized are keeping lists, bullet points, an agenda, shared documents among staff, etc. Know which ways work for you and be prepared to talk about them.

Rachelle's Answer
"I think of myself of as a pretty organized person, although I use my planner all the time. It has a section to more when things are due but also a section for notes so I can make a bullet list so I can cross out what has been done. It lets me look ahead to see what is coming but also what is due that day."
10.
What is a major challenge or problem you faced at your last position?
The interviewer wants to know about different difficulties that you've experienced with work. There are always going to be challenges when working, but it is important to remember that especially working with youth that any difficulties mean handling the issue but generally also talking to the parent or guardian as well.

For your answer think about a challenge you faced that you were able to fix with problem solving. Basing your answer off a situation that happened with youth will make your answer more powerful for the interviewer. Y

Rachelle's Answer #1
"One of my major issues I face at my last job was with two youth were using racial slurs towards another student. We had a zero tolerance rule against bullying there, and I had to have conversations with the youth and their parents. One child continue the following week to use the slurs and further action was needed for that student. I had to have another difficult conversation with the parent and had to make the decision to suspend the student from the program."
Cassandra's Answer #2
"For example: "One of the challenges at my last job was a guardian was always picking up there child at least thirty minutes late every day. Generally after fifteen minutes the parent of guardian is charged extra. This guardian didn't care about the cost, so I had to have a discussion about the youth potentially not being able to the program if this were to continue. This conversation was very difficult because the child was always well behaved and almost never had to be redirected."
11.
How do you decide what gets top priority when scheduling your time?
There is a lot of work that comes into being a Director of a Youth Program. There is much more paperwork than someone would think along with judging staff and the youth. Generally as the director you'll have an assistant as well, so some of the paperwork will be shared, but the majority of the work falls on you.

You are the person people will go to when they have questions, you'll be the one parents go to when there is problems- the interviewer wants to know that you are going to be able to juggle all the tasks that will be coming your way. You are going to need to decide between what is the top priority on your list every single day, because more will be added daily. Show the interviewer that you understand being the director won't be easy and reassure with examples on how you can balance multiple things that are important.

Rachelle's Answer
"The top priority will always be the safety of the youth, so no matter what I am doing they will come first. I know that being the director will be a huge task and I am ready to handle it. Since I have been an assistant director for the past three years, I've been able to learn how my current director schedules his time. A huge thing that I believe helps him is how he schedules his time when youth aren't here, he tries to get everything done that needs no interrupts, while saving things that can have interrupts when youth are at our center."
12.
What is the most rewarding part of working with youth?
The interviewer wants to know what keeps you going in this career. There are days that are going to be difficult and the interviewer wants to you have a reason for coming back every day. You will need to find out what drives you to do what you do, it doesn't have to be a huge answer.

Take time to think about why you do what you do. Does the light in the eye of a child finally learning a new skill what drives you or maybe being the adult in their life that will always be there to listen? To make it easier to answer this question, think about a time where you saw the difference you were making in a child's life and talk about that time.

Rachelle's Answer
"I was working for an after school tutoring program for struggling freshmen. Last year I ran into the student at the grocery store, she graduated from high school and is off to college. Back when I was working with her, she didn't believe in herself and was only passing one class. She thanked me for my help and told me how she didn't know where she would be without the help she received. When working with youth you sometimes don't see the results right away, but later down the road they see how efforts made. The most rewarding part for me is seeing them succeed."
13.
Why should we hire you?
The interviewer wants to know why they should pick you over the other candidates for this position. If there is anything that you haven't been able to mention about yourself in the interview yet, you should bring it up now. Is there an interesting certification that would be beneficial for them to know about or an experience that's not on your resume- tell them about it.

Talk about what you will bring to the program that you believe other people won't. Talk yourself up for this question, but remember not to go into a fifteen minute conversation. The interviewer wants to know what makes you different and why you'll be an asset to their program.

Rachelle's Answer
"I will bring my whole heart to this program, I have always wanted to be a program director. I know that I am young and don't bring years of experience with me, but I bring a passion for growth for myself and the program. I want to give the youth of this center the best positive growing atmosphere possible."
14.
Think about a challenging staff you've been apart of, what improved the culture?
Not everyone on staff is going to get along and that's okay. The most important part is that the staff is able to work together to help the youth have a fun and safe place to learn. Many times there will be issues among employees, but is important to know how to handle everyone's differences.

The interviewer wants to hear about a time that you were on a challenging staff and how you handled it. You can talk about a staff you were the boss of and how you were able to resolve the issues among staff. If you haven't been the boss, that's okay- just talk about a time that you were a part of a difficult staff and how you handled it. The interviewer just wants to make sure that you'll be able to handle challenges with people.

Rachelle's Answer
"I haven't been the supervisor of a challenging staff yet, but I have been a part of a few challenging staff environments. I think the most challenging staff I have been apart of was when two of my coworkers would not even talk to each other. It may it very difficult to get work done, I was able to help by being the mediator between the two. I also brought it to the boss's attention and he was able to get involved to help resolve the situation."
15.
Have you ever been overloaded with work?
Most times during work environments people have felt overloaded with work and that's okay. You can be honest with the interviewer about a time you've felt overloaded. The interviewer is more concerned with what happened after you felt overloaded. The interviewer wants to know that you have coping skills to being overwhelmed with work.

You don't have to go into detail about how you decompress from work when you are overwhelmed, but make sure you have a few different techniques so when you feel overwhelmed you know who to turn to. For your answer, give a brief time you felt overwhelmed and than talk to the interviewer how you were able to overcome it.

Rachelle's Answer
"When I first started as a director, I felt very overloaded with paperwork and my staff keeping up required trainings and much more. I called one of my mentors who had been in a similar situation starting out years ago and she was able to walk me through ways that I would be able to organize better. I have different resources to reach out to when I feel overworked that don't affect my job."
More Interview Q&As
Explore expert tips and resources to be more confident in your next interview.
Behavioral
Common
Phone
Tough
Leadership
All Interview Topics
All Career Q&As
25 Youth Program Director Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Interview Questions
  1. Describe a situation where you had to make a quick decision.
  2. How do you handle stress and pressure?
  3. Ten years from now, where do you see yourself?
  4. How would a past employee or coworker describe you?
  5. What is your greatest strength? How does it help you as a Youth Program Director?
  6. Have you ever had to fire anyone? How did you feel about that?
  7. How do you communicate with parents and guardians?
  8. What techniques do you use to find the right person to hire?
  9. How do you keep track of work so that it gets done on time?
  10. What is a major challenge or problem you faced at your last position?
  11. How do you decide what gets top priority when scheduling your time?
  12. What is the most rewarding part of working with youth?
  13. Why should we hire you?
  14. Think about a challenging staff you've been apart of, what improved the culture?
  15. Have you ever been overloaded with work?
  16. Why do you want a career as a Youth Program Director?
  17. How do you stay motivated?
  18. What is your greatest weakness? What are you doing to improve it?
  19. What is your management style for staff?
  20. Why do you feel it is important for our organization to have active youth members?
  21. How do you get a peer or colleague to accept one of your ideas?
  22. How do you evaluate success?
  23. What do you know about our organization?
  24. How many years of experience do you have working with youth?
  25. Tell me about an accomplishment related to a past program you are most proud of.
Disclaimer
Our interview questions and answers are created by experienced recruiters and interviewers. These questions and answers do not represent any organization, school, or company on our site. Interview questions and answer examples and any other content may be used else where on the site. We do not claim our questions will be asked in any interview you may have. Our goal is to create interview questions and answers that will best prepare you for your interview, and that means we do not want you to memorize our answers. You must create your own answers, and be prepared for any interview question in any interview.
Learn more about what we believe >
Read our Terms of Use for more information >