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Taxi Drivers Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated January 3rd, 2019 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Job Interviews     Careers     Transportation    
Question 1 of 30
Do you feel that you are currently paid what you are worth?
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How to Answer
The interviewer would like to know if you feel undervalued in your current role. Many employees will look for new work if they think that they are underpaid and underappreciated. Of course, this potential new employer wants to ensure that they will make you a competitive offer that will entice you to join their organization, and stay there. Talk to the interviewer about your current compensation and whether or not you feel it is fair. Be sure to have researched your answer to back you up, versus throwing out a random number and hoping it will stick.
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Answer Examples
1.
Do you feel that you are currently paid what you are worth?
The interviewer would like to know if you feel undervalued in your current role. Many employees will look for new work if they think that they are underpaid and underappreciated. Of course, this potential new employer wants to ensure that they will make you a competitive offer that will entice you to join their organization, and stay there. Talk to the interviewer about your current compensation and whether or not you feel it is fair. Be sure to have researched your answer to back you up, versus throwing out a random number and hoping it will stick.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"According to my union leader, I am slightly underpaid compared to my industry colleagues. My current taxi company is small, and they do what they can, but this is part of why I am seeking a new position."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I feel that my current employer pays me fairly; however, I would like to see an increase in pay if given more night shifts."
2.
What do you think of Uber and other ride sharing programs?
The taxi industry and Uber have a longstanding love-hate relationship that goes as deep as Union agreements and government legislation. Regardless of what you think of ride-sharing programs, be sure to provide reasonable statements that support your opinion. Displaying to the interviewer that you've given this issue some thought shows dedication to your career as a taxi driver. Be careful not to make unsubstantiated remarks. Concentrate on the fact that you genuinely care about your job and the industry you're in, putting in the time to research and understand the issues at hand.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I understand that there have been arguments between Uber and the taxi industry. I fully believe that Uber and other rideshare programs are here to stay at this point. Passengers should be aware of the risk that comes from riding with untrained drivers. Do I believe that taking a taxi is best? Yes, I do. However, I understand that Uber can also be very convenient."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I would avoid driving with a rideshare program as I do not believe these companies protect their drivers or passengers adequately. With that said, I do understand why Millennials and Generation Z enjoy the convenience of booking through a ride-share program such as Uber."
3.
If a customer was screaming at you because you made a wrong turn, how would you handle the situation?
Your future employer is already aware that instances like this can be unavoidable. They want to know that you're level-headed enough to deal with the situation in a professional manner. Walk the hiring authority through the action you would take should you make a wrong turn, inconveniencing a passenger.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"If I took a wrong turn and angered a passenger, I'd sincerely apologize for my mistake and do my best to improve the situation. I have always been professional in my duties, and I don't take it personally when a customer takes out their frustration on me."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"To scream at me would never be acceptable; however, I would still apologize for my mistake. If my GPS were not taking the passenger the way they wanted to go, I would ask them to provide me with their preferred route. Sometimes a passenger will have a preferred route, even if it may not be the fastest, and I fully understand that. If the passenger were incessantly angry, I would offer to drop them off sooner and reimburse their ride."
4.
Have you ever been in a car accident, while on the job? If so, was the accident your fault?
If you've never been in an accident before, then that's great! If you have, then be honest about it. The interviewer is going to check your driving record, regardless; so, lying about it might cost you the job. Whether it was your fault or not, talk to the interviewer about the accident, what caused it, and the measures you take to avoid another incident like that. To end your response on a positive note, tell the interviewer that the accident has made you a more careful, attentive, and responsible driver.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I was in a fender-bender about four months ago that was deemed to be the other drivers' fault. I stopped at a red light, and he was on his phone, not paying attention, and rear-ended me. I had a passenger in the car at the time, and so I made sure to report everything as per my employers' requirements. The accident is on my employee record, but documented as not being my fault."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Thankfully, I have never been in an accident, on or off the job. I am a careful driver, always keeping my head on a swivel. I abide by distracted driving laws at all times and take the rules of the road seriously. After all, my passengers must feel safe in my car!"
5.
Why did you choose to become a taxi driver?
You can answer this question from a more personal perspective to allow the interviewer to get to know you a bit better. Perhaps you looked up to your uncle who was a skilled truck driver, or maybe you enjoy being in the driver's seat. Talk to the interviewer about your passion for a driving-related career. As the interviewer knows, most of the time, people who genuinely love their jobs are great at it and perform consistently as model employees.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Driving has always been a passion for me as it allows me to see and meet new people. I feel at ease driving passengers to their destinations. It is an enjoyable career, and I am grateful for the opportunity to be a taxi driver."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"After spending fifteen years on the road as a long-haul truck driver, I decided to look for a career that kept me closer to home but still incorporated driving for a living. Through research, I read how fulfilling a career as a taxi driver can be. This career change gives me the opportunity to dial down the amount of time I am away from my family. I can set my schedule for the most part, and still earn a good living."
6.
Do you have your own insurance?
Depending on the region which you are applying, you may be required to carry insurance on your car, and as a business operator. Be sure to check the laws and regulations in your area. Also, if your city offers a taxi union, you can go to the union and ask for information on the requirements and current legislation.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I understand that full insurance is a requirement before reporting to work as a taxi driver. I brought my required paperwork, and proof of insurance with me, today. You are welcome to take a copy of everything for your records."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Just this week I contacted the local union, and they walked me through the steps I need to take to ensure that I am fully covered and insured. I am aware of these requirements and will have everything in order before my first day of work."
7.
Which parts of your current driving position brings you the most stress?
Stress can often be a regular part of the day to day work experience. Talk to the interviewer about which areas of your career are the most stressful. Ensure that your answer does not include a factor that would make you appear unfit for the position. (IE: a taxi driver should not find driving to be the most stressful part of the job)

Rachelle's Answer #1
"The part of my career that brings me the most stress is when the schedule is running behind due to lack of hustle on my teams part, or disorganization by dispatch. I like to be on time with my schedule to ensure that my passengers are taken care of."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Overall, I do not have a lot of stress in my day; however, when I am asked to pick up belligerent or drunk customers, I do find that stressful. For that reason, I try to take shifts earlier in the day, and on weekdays. Routes to and from the airport have also been a great workaround for me."
8.
What is your greatest weakness? What are you doing to improve it?
Pick weaknesses that are not a core skill for this driving position. You can be candid in your answer; recognizing that you aren't great at something and acknowledging your need to improve. Be sure to have an action plan in place for improving on this weakness.

Perhaps you are watching TED talks to gain skills in a particular area, reading the latest-and-greatest book on the subject, or maybe you are taking a seminar at a nearby community center. We are all human with our weaknesses, so don't be afraid to share yours!

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I would say the area I need to focus on improving would be my proficiency in the Taxi Dispatch App. I can get by, and it does not hinder my ability to do my job successfully, but it's certainly something that I need to work on improving. I recently found some online video tutorials from the app's developers and have been watching those for some assistance."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Currently my weakness would be my level of knowledge of this city. I recently moved here and am studying the road systems and names diligently. I realize that the best way to learn is to get out there and learn first hand, so I have been driving around a lot in my spare time, teaching myself the roads and shortcuts."
9.
Have you ever had road rage? If so, what triggered it?
Road rage would raise a serious red flag for your interviewer. A cab company can't afford customers complaining about a driver who can't control his temper. Reassure the interviewer that this won't be a problem with you. Mention that you are quite capable of handling stressful situations and that your previous employer can attest to that.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Road rage is not my style, at all. If another driver were to cut me off or be rude to me on the road, I would rather they pass me, so that I can get on with my day. Besides, acting out of rage from behind the wheel is very dangerous."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"When I was first learning to drive, I had one incident where another driver cut me off so badly that my brake assists kicked in. Full disclosure, I did honk and give him the finger. However, as time goes on, and the more driving I do, the better I can predict the actions of others on the road, and take their infractions less personally."
10.
Is there ever an acceptable reason to not wear a seatbelt?
The interviewer is checking to see that you understand the importance of seatbelt safety for both yourself and your passengers. Discuss the importance of seatbelt safety, what it means to you, and how you ensure that your customers are wearing their seatbelts.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Seatbelts reduce the risk of death by 45%. For this reason, it's imperative to me that my passengers and I are buckled up at all times. There is no reason not to wear a seatbelt."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Before putting the car into drive, I always ensure that my passengers have their seat belts buckled. It is my responsibility, as the driver, to ensure that everyone is safe before I proceed. As far as I have seen, and I've been driving for twelve years now, there is no reason not to wear a seatbelt."
11.
How important is the cleanliness of your vehicle?
A clean car offers proof that the driver is attentive to their vehicle and committed to their job. Simply put, an unclean vehicle is an indicator of neglect. As a driver, this concept makes perfect sense to you, and you should tell your interviewer so. The standards of cleanliness you use for your personal car are the same that you apply to the company vehicle. You could even mention that it makes you happy when passengers comment on how clean your cab is!

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I take pride in my cab being clean at all times. Just as a corporate professional works best with a clean office and tidy desk, I work best when my vehicle is tidy and smells nice."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Cleanliness is essential since I like to work in a comfortable space, and I want my passengers to feel welcome. I clean my car every day after work, ensuring it's ready for the next shift. Often, I have passengers compliment me on the clean state of my vehicle, and that makes me feel great."
12.
What is the safest speed, on our main highways?
The interviewer would like to know that you always obey the posted speed limits and that you do not come up with an excuse to speed on the highway, even when it's clear. Be sure to express the fact that the speed limit should never be broken, no matter the circumstance. You might also want to point out that, despite the speed limit being a specific rate, it is not always to safe to drive that fast.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I believe that most highways in this region have a posted speed limit of 70mph. Although that's the posted speed, it doesn't mean that is always the safest speed to go. Road conditions, construction, and congestion are all factors to keep in mind when I am driving on the highway. With that said, under no circumstances is it right for me to drive over the posted limits."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Most of the highways in this area are 70mph. I do not speed, and I always obey traffic laws. It's important that I provide my passengers with a safe ride, every time. For example, many times in the winter months, I do not even reach top highway speed. I use my discretion based on road conditions."
13.
What is your greatest strength? How does it help you as a taxi driver?
If you are unsure what your greatest strengths are, think about the things you complimented on regularly. Perhaps there are positive comments you receive on your performance reviews. These traits can be great starting points for identifying your most significant strength! If possible, try to link your response with the characteristics asked for in the job posting.

Some great strengths to mention are:

- Communicative
- Loyal
- Collaborative
- Tech Savvy
- Flexible in Schedule/Availability
- Persistent and Determined
- Eager for Knowledge/New Skills
- Concerned with Safety

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Family and friends alike have always complimented me on my sharp eye, reflexes, and quick response time. As a taxi driver, these attributes would be extremely helpful in maneuvering the vehicle in tight spots and avoiding accidents."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My greatest strength is my ability to make anyone feel comfortable in my presence. I am confident that anyone can get into my cab and feel safe, well taken care of, and secure. I see in your job posting that you are looking for taxi drivers who are personable. I believe my references will say the same of me."
14.
Are you sure that you can handle the physical requirements of this role?
As a taxi driver, you will be required to perform some physically demanding tasks such as sitting for long periods and lifting luggage in and out of the back of your vehicle. You may even need to help an elderly or disabled person in and out of your car. Assure the interviewer that you can handle the physical requirements associated with being a taxi driver.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I have been driving a taxi for about two years now, and have not experienced any physical task to be an issue. I am sure to stretch my legs as often as possible. Also, I work out on my days off, to ensure I stay in good shape."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I do need to take stretches now and then so, between passengers, I may step out of my vehicle and do a couple of leg and back stretches. It's important that I keep my circulation going! These breaks also help a great deal with keeping me wide awake and energetic during my shift."
15.
Would you consider yourself a dependable driver?
Your job requires you to transport people safely from one place to another so your answer to this should be a confident 'Yes!' Besides that, it's also your responsibility to arrive at the agreed pick-up point on time, so it's best to mention that you're punctual and good at understanding directions and GPS. Don't forget to throw in positive feedback from your previous clients or employer to impress the hiring authority.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"In my three years as a driver in this city I have never had an accident. My full understanding of this city, it's quadrants, and street names help to ensure that I am prompt for my customers and that I get them where they need to go, exactly on time. I do consider myself to be highly dependable and when you call my references, they will surely agree."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"To be dependable and reliable are some of the most important characteristics of a taxi driver. My current employer has thanked me many times for being reliable, on time, and present every day. My customers have left me many compliments, so that makes me proud. When someone calls for a ride, it's up to me to get them where they need to go, safely and on time. I take that seriously!"
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30 Taxi Drivers Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Interview Questions
  1. Do you feel that you are currently paid what you are worth?
  2. What do you think of Uber and other ride sharing programs?
  3. If a customer was screaming at you because you made a wrong turn, how would you handle the situation?
  4. Have you ever been in a car accident, while on the job? If so, was the accident your fault?
  5. Why did you choose to become a taxi driver?
  6. Do you have your own insurance?
  7. Which parts of your current driving position brings you the most stress?
  8. What is your greatest weakness? What are you doing to improve it?
  9. Have you ever had road rage? If so, what triggered it?
  10. Is there ever an acceptable reason to not wear a seatbelt?
  11. How important is the cleanliness of your vehicle?
  12. What is the safest speed, on our main highways?
  13. What is your greatest strength? How does it help you as a taxi driver?
  14. Are you sure that you can handle the physical requirements of this role?
  15. Would you consider yourself a dependable driver?
  16. Would you be willing to work night shifts, or change your hours at short notice?
  17. What is your first reaction when you do something wrong at work?
  18. Do you manage your time well?
  19. How do you ensure your own safety, as a taxi driver?
  20. How well do you know this city?
  21. How have you dealt with irate customers in the past?
  22. How patient of a person are you?
  23. Have you ever missed work, for an unexcused reason?
  24. How clean is your driving record?
  25. Why is it important for you to be part of a taxi union?
  26. What would you do if a passenger began to do drugs or anything illegal in your taxi?
  27. How do you feel about having cameras set up in your cab?
  28. What would you do if your doctor prescribed drugs to you can that could impact your driving?
  29. What would you do if a passenger told you to turn off the meter and they would pay you cash for the ride?
  30. If a passenger left something of value behind, what would you do?
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