MockQuestions MockQuestions
Interviews Questions by Career
Interviews Questions by Company
Interviews Questions by Topic
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

FBI Interview
Questions

25 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated December 2nd, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Question 1 of 25
What are your top 3 strengths, and how will they benefit the FBI?
View Answers
How to Answer
The FBI reportedly receives over 10,000 Special Agent applications every year, but they hire only 500-750. The FBI indeed picks just the cream of the crop. Being the best includes having a record of excellence in your professional, and personal life. Extra-curricular and volunteer work is always a stand-out factor to bring to your application while showing a history of success and positivity is also favored. The FBI is also known for seeking out 'Type A' individuals who are characteristically ambitious, decisive, driven and highly competitive. A great response to this question will include a balance of all these factors.
1000s of Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
Top 25 FBI Interview Questions with Full Content
1.
What are your top 3 strengths, and how will they benefit the FBI?
The FBI reportedly receives over 10,000 Special Agent applications every year, but they hire only 500-750. The FBI indeed picks just the cream of the crop. Being the best includes having a record of excellence in your professional, and personal life. Extra-curricular and volunteer work is always a stand-out factor to bring to your application while showing a history of success and positivity is also favored. The FBI is also known for seeking out 'Type A' individuals who are characteristically ambitious, decisive, driven and highly competitive. A great response to this question will include a balance of all these factors.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"My greatest strengths include my tenacity, my generous nature, and the fact that I am decisive. I have a real passion for helping others, meaning I will provide the human empathy that is needed to be an incredible Special Agent. At the same time, I will never give up or stop, until the job is done."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I recently asked my friends and family why they felt I would be successful in the FBI. They responded that my desire for justice, my competitive nature, as well as my ability to remain pragmatic are what make me a perfect choice for the FBI. I can find a great balance between helping others and keeping sound judgment based on facts, for instance."
Anonymous Answer
"I am passionate, ambitious, and dependable. I am always taking the initiative to go the extra length, whether it is expected/requested or not. My passion for the field provides me with a continuous daily motivation that I, in turn, apply to every aspect of each day and furthermore, the task at hand. Coworkers have said that I am very loyal, reliable, and dependable."
Rachelle's Answer
The FBI certainly looks for people with integrity, which it sounds like you have! Try to focus your answer more specifically on how these strengths will benefit the FBI. Successfully answering this question means ensuring that the interviewer can picture you in this role.
"My top three strengths include my ambition, loyalty, and dependability. The FBI needs a team member they can count on to do the right thing and to show up 100% every day. My ambitious nature ensures that I will be quick to train, eager to learn, and ready for any challenge that comes my way."
Was this answer helpful? Yes (1) or No (0)
Anonymous Answer
"My greatest strengths include a strong desire for justice, integrity, dependability, and the ability to work with people from diverse backgrounds. The FBI needs team-oriented agents, who are trustworthy because the agency counts on them to do the right thing and show up 100% every day. My ambitious nature and eagerness to learn ensures that I will be coachable and quick to train, which will put me in a position to be ready to tackle the challenges that come with being an FBI Special Agent."
Rachelle's Answer
Excellent answer! Not only do you highlight your top strengths, but you also make a great case for how they will benefit the FBI, should you be hired.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
2.
What is your greatest weakness?
Preparing for this question requires self-awareness and strategy. Focus on a weakness that you could turn into a strength or share something you are taking action to improve. Pick weaknesses that are not a core skill for this position. You can be candid in your answer; recognizing that you aren't great at something and acknowledging your need to improve. Be sure to have an action plan in place for improving on this weakness.

Perhaps you are watching TED talks to gain skills in a particular area, reading the latest-and-greatest book on the subject, or maybe you are taking a seminar. We are all human with our weaknesses, so don't be afraid to share yours!

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I believe I could improve on some technical skills including Excel and PowerPoint. Currently I am at a beginner to intermediate level; however, I would be more comfortable at an advanced level. I have enrolled myself in an evening workshop for the next six weeks. We will see how stellar my skills are after I complete that course."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I know this will come off as cliche, but it's truthful. My weakness is not delegating. I know what needs doing and how I want it done, so it's often easier to do it myself. However, it can inhibit my ability to grow. I cannot take on every step of a project; I need to be able to give the task or a portion of it to another office, if possible. I've spoken with my commanding officer about it, and we've developed a system where he can call me out on the behavior since often I'm not aware of it. By bringing awareness to it at the moment, I find my propensity to hold onto control has decreased, so I'm certainly moving in the right direction."
Anonymous Answer
"At times I tend to take on too many tasks, especially if someone close to me asks for my assistance. I won't bite off more than I can chew, but I can stretch myself thin at times. I work on overcoming this by sometimes having to tell people I am not available to assist but will point them in the right direction."
Rachelle's Answer
It's a very difficult thing to learn to say no. Great that you recognize this in yourself and that you are working to improve. Have you used any resources to learn how to draw healthy boundaries? (i.e., podcasts, books) If so, you could include in your answer, also.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
Anonymous Answer
"When working on an individual project that doesn’t require collaboration with others, at times, I tend to be hesitant to ask for help when I need it. I have learned that it is much more beneficial both for me and the organization to reach out when I do not understand something or feel burned out with my workload. I now also understand that many experts around me have specific knowledge and skills that can make my work better. While I am still working on it, I have been able to produce more high-quality work as a result of getting help from those around me."
Rachelle's Answer
This is a tough lesson to learn for many of us, but it sounds like you are making stride, which is great! Good response.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
3.
How will you handle the inevitable stress and pressure that comes with working for the FBI?
The FBI releases a report, every year, that directly addresses the toll that violence, physical, and psychological events have on their enforcement officers. This stress and trauma factor is so real that the FBI has begun to implement post-trauma treatment programs for their officers who need to cope with the circumstances they have faced on the job.

Before your interview, ensure that you have read the most recent report, and be ready to address the ways that you plan to remain ahead of the inevitable stress that comes with working for the FBI. Some coping mechanisms recommended by current and former agents include:

- Training themselves to reinterpret negative events and turn them into positive solutions
- Remaining fit physically, and committing to personal health initiatives
- Looking at more seasoned FBI agents as mentors and role models
-Talking about events and stories that are bothering them, rather than dwelling on them or bottling them up

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I am quite resilient to stress and believe this is because of my eight-plus years' experience being in an enforcement officer role. Under times of extreme stress, I make sure to share my experience with a colleague, asking for their input on how to move forward, or see the positive in the situation. In extreme circumstances, I am not afraid to book a therapy session to work through my thoughts."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I plan to handle the stress and pressure of this job by looking to more seasoned agents, and taking their advice when it comes to getting through especially tough situations. I am lucky to have a solid network of supportive family and friends who I can lean on. Also, I keep my mind clear by starting every day with a one-hour meditation and workout session."
Anonymous Answer
"Nobody can prepare for or say how they will handle a situation of which they have not yet experienced first hand; so it is hard to say at this point, however through patience, self-reflection and the support of others as constant positive aspects of your life, any reliable and successful professional is able to work through it in their ways, whichever those may be, while keeping in mind and being open to continuous growth and new lessons learned/new insights and constructive criticism."
Rachelle's Answer
This answer is not really personal or targeted to you. It reads as more of a lesson, and less of a direct response. Remember, with the FBI, if you answer anything indirectly they will pick up on it immediately. I have reworded, below.
"I plan to handle the stress and pressure by exercising patience with myself and others, taking time for self-reflection, and leaning on the support of my family. I have many positives in my life that I can focus on when times get tough."
Was this answer helpful? Yes (1) or No (0)
Anonymous Answer
"I will not be intimidated to look up to my senior agents for guidance and to seek advice on how they manage their stress. Also, I would not be afraid to seek assistance when necessary if I feel like the caseload requires additional support. Furthermore, I would make sure that I am eating properly, exercising, and try to get sufficient rest; being physically and mentally fit is important for this position."
Rachelle's Answer
Your answer shows an excellent, well-rounded approach. It's great that you will ask for help when needed, refer to your senior agents, and also take care of yourself physically and mentally.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
4.
The FBI hires less than 5% of our applicants. Why should we choose you?
Competition is incredibly tight when it comes to gaining a coveted spot in the FBI. Once you finish your law enforcement related degree, you will need to complete at least three years of relevant work experience.

From there, your FBI application process will include extensive background checks with a polygraph, drug test, credit check, and interviews with family and friends, as well as former employers. After acceptance, you can then enter the FBI training academy which provides you with 20 + weeks of training.

Considering the significant leaps that you passed to get here; you must have a very compelling answer prepared for this question. If possible, pull from your personnel file, your volunteer work, and your education history, to create an excellent and well-rounded response.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"You will see from my files that I have held exemplary status through my entire training, as well as during the work experience before applying to the FBI. I have a consistent history of doing the right thing, being tenacious through the toughest situations, and remaining loyal under all circumstances. I graduated with a Bachelors' Degree in Law, with honors, while also working part-time and giving back to a variety of community initiatives including the homeless shelter, and food bank. With me, you are receiving a high achiever who understands the importance of delivering the best in everything that I do."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I believe the FBI should choose me because I have a record which shows consistency, excellence, and a passion for this career path. From my top-of-the-class grades to passing my background checks with flying colors, it is clear that I am a candidate you can take a chance on."
Anonymous Answer
"I am not looking for just a paycheck; I am passionate about wanting to make a difference. I have many years in law enforcement, which gives me a great foundation towards being an agent. I also have experience and education in cybersecurity, specifically digital forensics investigations, which would make me be a great candidate for the Cyber Crime Unit. I am continually seeking opportunities to improve myself and my knowledge and skillsets. Moreover, I am great at managing and balancing my personal and work life events."
Rachelle's Answer
You make an airtight case for hiring you. This is a strong answer because it's diverse, factual, and based on specific ways you can benefit the FBI.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
Anonymous Answer
"I have a strong sense of justice and doing what is right. I am very analytical and approach problems systematically and efficiently. My career background in the biological sciences is very different than probably most candidates. Still, I think that makes my application diverse and gives me a different perspective on potential problems."
Rachelle's Answer
Your background in biological sciences is a unique factor! Please dig into that further, being more descriptive in exactly how this would benefit you in this role with the FBI.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
5.
When have you gone above and beyond the call of duty for another individual?
The interviewer wants to know that you are not the type of person to do the bare minimum. As an agent, you will work in a team, whether doing research or investigations. You need to prove that you have a sense of responsibility towards your teammates. In your past roles, how have you stepped up to support coworkers?

Rachelle's Answer #1
"When I worked in law enforcement in my hometown I was committed to supporting my partner, the people on my team, as well as the people of the community. I got a call that two little kids in a low-income neighborhood had their bikes stolen just days apart from each other. I bought them new bikes and delivered them myself. I did not tell anyone that I did this, as I did not want recognition for the act."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I have covered shifts for fellow officers many times, as they have been sick, had family emergencies, or needed personal health days. It's important that my team can rely on me, even when it isn't mandatory that I support them with time off."
Anonymous Answer
"As a police officer, you are expected to report to work, even if there is inclement weather. There was a time we had a huge snowstorm, which made it impossible for some to report to work. I volunteered to stay at work and picked up other duties. I slept at the job for four days straight before I was able to go home."
Rachelle's Answer
Wow, that is a serious example of dedication. This is the type of answer the interviewer(s) will be looking for. You went above and beyond for your unit, your colleagues, and your community.
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
Anonymous Answer
"When I was in the Army, I was patrolling the barracks from 12 to 2 a.m., and as my shift was about to end, I noticed that my replacement was not showing up because he was probably sleeping. I knew that he was exhausted because he hadn't had a day off for four days because we were short on people in that period. I decided to continue and do his shift as well for two extra hours and not complain to my superior."
Rachelle's Answer
This is a very nice example! Good work! I have reworded it slightly for the sake of flow.
"While in the army, I was patrolling the barracks from 12:00 to 2:00 am. As my shift was about to end, I noticed that my replacement had not yet arrived. I figured he had slept in out of exhaustion, due to working four days in a row. Rather than reporting the situation to my superior, I continued to do his shift for two hours, allowing him to get the rest he needed."
Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
View All 25 FBI Questions and Answers
Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Q&As,
plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
More Interview Q&As
Explore expert tips and resources to be more confident in your next interview.
Behavioral
Common
Phone
Tough
Leadership
All Interview Topics
All Career Q&As
About Our Interview Q&As
Our interview questions and answers are created by experienced recruiters and interviewers. These questions and answers do not represent any organization, school, or company on our site. We do not claim they will be asked in any interview you may have. Our goal is to create interview questions and answers that will best prepare you for your interview, and that means we do not want you to memorize our answers. You must create your own answers, and be prepared for any interview question in any interview.