MockQuestions MockQuestions
Interviews Questions by Career
Interviews Questions by Company
Interviews Questions by Topic
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Biomedical Technician Interview
Questions

25 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated August 22nd, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Question 1 of 25
How do you feel about being on call?
View Answers
How to Answer
The interviewer would like to see what your availability is and if it will fit the needs of their organization. Being on-call as a biomedical technician may be necessary, depending on the size of your team. If a piece of equipment fails in the middle of the night, a doctor does not care what time it is. The patients' health is at stake.

Assure the interviewer that you, and your family, will be okay with you leaving to work in the middle of the night from time to time. Also, take this question as an opportunity to ask how often you would be expected to be on call. Be careful not to rule out the position entirely before finding out all of the details.
25 Biomedical Technician Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
  1. How do you feel about being on call?
  2. Working on million dollar equipment can be stressful. Are you prepared to handle this?
  3. How do you explain complicated concepts to those who may not understand?
  4. What piece of equipment do you find most challenging to repair?
  5. With advancements in technology, are you worried that remote diagnostics will replace your job?
  6. Are you certified to work on any specific types of equipment?
  7. Performing work in a timely manner is very important for our facility and its patients. How are your time management skills?
  8. What equipment do you have the most experience on?
  9. How would you handle a situation that required you to fix two pieces of equipment at the same time?
  10. What equipment did you specialize in during your training?
  11. What are your long term career goals as a Biomedical Technician?
  12. Would you be capable of writing a technician manual for all newcomers to the field?
  13. Tell me about your attendance and punctuality.
  14. Why did you choose a career as a biomedical technician?
  15. How do you determine when a piece of equipment is no longer repairable and must be replaced?
  16. If a double shift was required of you how would you handle that?
  17. Do you have experience working around patients? Are you comfortable communicating directly with them?
  18. What does the term preventative maintenance mean to you, and why is it important?
  19. What are your salary expectations?
  20. What type of manager brings out the best in you?
  21. When have you worked with a diverse group of people?
  22. In your opinion, why is it important to develop relationships with coworkers?
  23. Equipment maintenance requires great patience. How do you increase your patience level in challenging situations?
  24. How would your co-workers describe your attention to detail?
  25. What motivates you?
15 Biomedical Technician Answer Examples
1.
How do you feel about being on call?
The interviewer would like to see what your availability is and if it will fit the needs of their organization. Being on-call as a biomedical technician may be necessary, depending on the size of your team. If a piece of equipment fails in the middle of the night, a doctor does not care what time it is. The patients' health is at stake.

Assure the interviewer that you, and your family, will be okay with you leaving to work in the middle of the night from time to time. Also, take this question as an opportunity to ask how often you would be expected to be on call. Be careful not to rule out the position entirely before finding out all of the details.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My family understands the potentially late or random hours required of a biomedical technician, and we are all prepared for that. In my current position, I work on call one weekend per month. Could you share your on-call schedule with me?"
2.
Working on million dollar equipment can be stressful. Are you prepared to handle this?
As a biomedical technician, you work on expensive equipment every day. When asked this question don't show defeat but show that you are confident in your skills! Talk about how it motivates you to troubleshoot and fix the item correctly. Perhaps the satisfaction that you achieve from knowing you saved millions of dollars is what keeps you going on the most stressful of days. Let the interviewer know that the price of the item doesn't detour you from performing your job.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I give 100% of my attention to every piece of equipment that I service, regardless of the dollar value. I don't see a cost associated with the equipment. I see it as my job to fix an item to keep a patient safe."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I can imagine that working on equipment worth millions would be intimidating, especially as I just start my career. I think that focusing on the good that will come from the repair will help me to refocus on the task at hand."
3.
How do you explain complicated concepts to those who may not understand?
The interviewer wants to know that you are capable of explaining complex ideas without being condescending to your co-workers or talking over their heads. Give the interviewer an example of how you break down information to make it more easily digestible for the average person.

Think of a presentation about a complex topic, as a proposal to solve a challenging problem. The solution may seem obvious to you, but everyone else in the room is scratching their heads trying to figure out what you're talking about. When you can define key terms and phrases to make them more relevant to your audience, you have skill! Not everyone can do this.

Prepare an example that demonstrates your communication skills and your ability to convey complex information in easy to understand terms.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I abide by the KISS rule - Keep It Simple Silly! If you cannot explain a concept simply, then you do not understand it well enough. I recently rolled out a complex manual with many anomalies. I took the approach to share a broad overview and provide detail for reference. I often try to make analogies or share complex information in the form of a story."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I try to use written and verbal examples when addressing complicated concepts. If possible, I like to have hands-on examples, but that is not always feasible. I learned through a great university professor that communicating in more than one way helps those with different learning styles."
4.
What piece of equipment do you find most challenging to repair?
Turn this challenge into a positive! Sometimes we view challenging tasks as things we are not good at or an area where we lack training. If you think of a particular piece of equipment that you find challenging to repair because you haven't had a lot of experience with it, go ahead and let the interviewer know. Perhaps it was a challenging repair because it took you longer than expected to fix. Maybe you had to rely on a manual to aid you in a fix. Admitting that something was a challenge because you are unfamiliar with it is not a bad thing. The interviewer would rather hear that you face a challenge head-on versus seeing you come across as a know-it-all.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"The most challenging equipment I have worked on recently was a new model mammogram machine. It was challenging because the software system was one of which I was not familiar. I love a good challenge, though! I went to the manufacturer's website to find a downloadable manual, dove in, and got the job done in under 3 hours."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"While attending university, I found most of the coursework challenging; yet comfortable. I did have to work more diligently, and even hire a tutor when it came to the module on radiographic and fluoroscopic x-ray equipment. I ended up completing this module with a grade of 86%, so my diligence paid off. I do look forward to further exposure to this type of equipment."
5.
With advancements in technology, are you worried that remote diagnostics will replace your job?
The interviewer would like to know your thoughts regarding the advancements or remote and robotic diagnostics. As a biomedical technician, you need to show your value and that you aren't afraid that remote diagnostic will replace your job.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"That's a great question! Robotics is advancing very quickly so if that should happen; I plan to get in on the action and learn more about the actual programming of the robotic diagnostics. Manuals still need to be written, and code provided, for this to happen. My knowledge will always be valuable."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"There is always that chance that remote diagnostics will replace me. This outcome could be said for nearly any job. I prefer to focus on how I can be the best in my field, build professional relationships and show my supervisors that they have a great technician working for them. That personal effect is something remote diagnostics will never be able to replace."
6.
Are you certified to work on any specific types of equipment?
Having a specific certification could be that one thing that makes you stand apart from the rest. If you don't have any certifications just relay to the interviewer that it is something you'd like to work towards shortly. By letting the interviewer know that you have future goals related to education, it will tell them that you are a motivated person. Interviewers love motivated people!

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I do not currently hold any specific certifications, aside from my associate's degree in biomedical technology but I'm currently studying for my Laboratory Equipment Specialist Certification. I plan to test in 3 months."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I am certified to work on Laboratory Chemical Analyzers. I'd love the opportunity to become certified on the larger equipment you have in your facility. Do you recommend any particular certifications to help me be more successful in this role?"
7.
Performing work in a timely manner is very important for our facility and its patients. How are your time management skills?
The interviewer wants to know that you can handle the workload required of you in this position and that you will not become overwhelmed if/when workloads unexpectedly increase. When workloads increase, stress levels do too. How do you react?

So many pieces of equipment so little time. If you have been a team of one or 20, you've had to utilize your time management skills on a regular basis. Tell the interviewer how you've used your time by prioritizing work orders. How do you manage your day, so the work doesn't pile up and become unmanageable? Do you work best in a team where you can divide up the workload?

Rachelle's Answer #1
"In my current position we have a database that tracks the progress of each piece of equipment we are working on. I'm able to utilize this database to divide the workload and assure that the team is working effectively."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Here are some suggestions for handling your time:

- List your tasks and prioritize them
- Think of which jobs add to the company's bottom line, and start there
- Think of which pieces of equipment present the most urgency
- Organize your tasks by which ones you can complete independently and which ones you need help with
- Take sufficient breaks, so you do not exhaust yourself, thus slow down"
8.
What equipment do you have the most experience on?
The interviewer wants to know if you have a specific area of knowledge and comfort. Perhaps you were the go-to biomedical technician for a particular piece of equipment, in your most recent role. Maybe the staff in radiology ask for you by name if their equipment ever goes down. This interview question is the time for you to brag a bit about your skills and abilities.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"The equipment that I worked on the most was our laboratory equipment. The staff in our laboratory unit always knew they could call me up and I'd be there in minutes. I have built a great relationship with the professionals in our hospital, and I look forward to doing the same at your facility."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"We have a great team at the hospital which I currently intern. Because of the large ER department, I have the opportunity to maintain their equipment most often. We can send two technicians at a time to assess their equipment and have been able to cut the wait time for repairs in half."
9.
How would you handle a situation that required you to fix two pieces of equipment at the same time?
The interviewer wants to know how well you can multi-task. As we all know, you can't efficiently multitask without one of the tasks somewhat suffering. Don't fall for this trick question. If the situation comes up that you have two pieces of equipment that are both needing to be repaired, you could always troubleshoot one while the other was calibrating. You want to let the interviewer know that you give 100% attention to one piece of equipment at a time to avoid errors.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"When I repair equipment I give each piece 100% of my attention and time. I feel if I was distracted by the second piece of equipment I might make an error resulting in wasted time and money. I will troubleshoot one piece of equipment while the other is calibrating, and call a junior technician to assist me."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"If I were asked to fix two pieces of equipment, simultaneously, I would ask a few pertinent questions to determine which piece was the true front-runner for urgency. I would ask which piece of equipment affected productivity the most. Also, I would ask if there were a critical patient situation at hand. I would choose which piece to address first; once those answers were provided."
10.
What equipment did you specialize in during your training?
To prepare for this question you'll need to do some research. Make phone calls, research websites or ask employees what type of equipment the company has. Besides talking about the equipment you specialized in, take this opportunity to briefly explain how, when and where you were trained on this equipment. Why did you specialize in the particular equipment?

Rachelle's Answer #1
"When I was trained by the military I had to opportunity to specialize as an Imaging Repair Specialist. In addition to MRI machines, I am also experienced in smaller laboratory equipment."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Through my career as a biomedical technician, I've been lucky enough to work on almost all inpatient radiology equipment. I noticed in your job ad that you are looking for four years' experience working on x-ray and mammography machines. I have six years' experience in each."
11.
What are your long term career goals as a Biomedical Technician?
The interviewer would like to know if you are invested in this career for the long term. If you are working towards further education to upsell you technician career, it is important to mention. Perhaps they have a tuition reimbursement program they can share with you! Whatever your goals are, be confident and proud. They are YOUR goals.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"My long-term goal is to upgrade my associate's degree to an engineering degree, with my focus remaining in biomedical. I would be thrilled to be able to, one day, train your new biomedical technicians. I feel that I need to upgrade my education to make that goal happen."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"One of my long-term goals is to become a supervisor for a team of junior technicians. I've always been told that I'm a natural leader and I'd love to serve in that capacity with your facility."
12.
Would you be capable of writing a technician manual for all newcomers to the field?
Are you the go-to person for the technician team? Perhaps you are referred to as being a subject matter expert on particular types of equipment. Are you confident in your skills and abilities? If so, then you might be ready to write manuals for new biomedical technicians. Let the interviewer know if this task has ever interested you or how you have worked towards it already. If sitting behind a desk writing manuals is not your thing, don't worry! Just state that although you have the knowledge and skills to share with others, you prefer to do so in a hands-on teaching atmosphere.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I would love the opportunity to share my knowledge with others in the field. Although I have not yet written a manual, this is a challenge I would certainly be up for."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I'm not quite ready to write a manual but I'm confident with a few more years of experience and some further mentorship, I will be ready."
13.
Tell me about your attendance and punctuality.
The interviewer is asking you this question because they want to make sure you are reliable and dependable. Can they count on you to show up to work on time? Mention that they are more than welcome to contact your references who will vouch for your perfect or near-perfect attendance.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"In the last year I have never called in sick. I've taken minimal vacation time and am always available for various shifts. When you call my references, they will confirm this information. I am proud to be punctual and reliable."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Punctuality is important to me. I make a point always to be present 15 minutes before my shift. Being early allows me the time to get my computer up and running, pour a cup of coffee and get ready to start my day. I am a healthy individual and have only been absent in situations like vacation time or pre-approved days off."
14.
Why did you choose a career as a biomedical technician?
Answer this question with a sense of passion. Tell the interviewer the story about when you knew you wanted to work on medical equipment. Have you always liked to tinker and fix things when you were a child? Have you always been good with your hands? Did the military train you? Whatever the reason is why you chose this career field, your confidence will make the interviewer want you to be a part of their team.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"My ASVAB test scores made me eligible to be a Biomedical Technician for the Air Force. I spent ten years in the Air Force and loved it. I was ready to choose a new path and continue my career in the civilian sector, so here I am today!"
Rachelle's Answer #2
"At a young age, I've always loved to take computers apart and learn how to put them back together. There are many working parts with medical equipment. I knew I wanted to learn how to maintain medical equipment because it's a huge component of taking care of people and making a difference in the medical community."
15.
How do you determine when a piece of equipment is no longer repairable and must be replaced?
As a biomedical technician, you assess each piece of equipment after the maximum limitation time has elapsed, and the medical equipment is no longer functional or repairable. A piece of equipment should be retired when irreparable damage has occurred. Assure the interviewer that you keep logs with details of each piece of equipment. Walk the interviewer through the process of decertifying a piece of equipment, how you tag it and replace it.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"When evaluating my equipment logs, if I notice a piece of equipment that is continuously needing repairs I will evaluate it fully and present the findings to my supervisor for their final evaluation. Once they give me the go-ahead, I will put in a procurement request for a new part or product. While that is waiting, I will label the piece of machinery correctly and store it."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"From my understanding, a piece of equipment needs to be replaced if it has suffered electrical damage or has reached a particular amount of hours. I know that every facility has their specific guidelines. Could you share your guidelines with me?"
View All 25 Biomedical Technician Questions and Answers
Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Q&As,
plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
More Interview Q&As
Explore expert tips and resources to be more confident in your next interview.
Behavioral
Common
Phone
Tough
Leadership
All Interview Topics
All Career Q&As
Suggested Career
Interview Q&As
Continue practicing by visiting these similar question sets
Biochemistry Technician
Biochemists
Biological Technician
Biomechanical Engineer
Medical Device Sales
Disclaimer
Our interview questions and answers are created by experienced recruiters and interviewers. These questions and answers do not represent any organization, school, or company on our site. Interview questions and answer examples and any other content may be used else where on the site. We do not claim our questions will be asked in any interview you may have. Our goal is to create interview questions and answers that will best prepare you for your interview, and that means we do not want you to memorize our answers. You must create your own answers, and be prepared for any interview question in any interview.