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Addiction Counselor Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated December 22nd, 2018 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Question 1 of 30
What are some addictions that you have worked with previously and can you share something about one addiction with me?
View Answers
How to Answer
When addictions are mentioned, many people automatically think of illegal drugs. However, there are many different addictions that addiction counselors must address. The interviewer wants to know that you are prepared to work with a variety of people who suffer from addiction. If you have a personal story, this is a good time to share it. Remember, do not use any information in your reference that may cause you to compromise patient confidentiality.
30 Addiction Counselor Interview Questions
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  1. What are some addictions that you have worked with previously and can you share something about one addiction with me?
  2. What would an ideal work schedule be like for you?
  3. How would your coworkers describe you?
  4. What makes you feel you will be a good fit for our organization?
  5. What made you choose a career as an Addiction Counselor?
  6. If a client began to be physically aggressive toward you, how would you handle the situation?
  7. What is something that is rewarding to you about being an addiction counselor?
  8. If you had a client who told you he was only coming to counseling because he was ordered to by a judge and that he had no intention of quitting drugs, how would you handle the situation?
  9. Have you or a loved one ever been directly affected by an addiction?
  10. Do you anticipate any changes in your life within the next 2-3 years that may prevent you from continuing employment here?
  11. Have you ever considered choosing a different specialty?
  12. What are your thoughts about inpatient treatment facilities, and what do you think could make the chances of staying in recovery better for clients after they have been discharged from inpatient care?
  13. Has there ever been a time that you had a disagreement with a coworker, and if so, how was it resolved?
  14. What characteristics do you think are important for an addiction counselor to possess?
  15. Under what circumstances would you feel that you need to turn the care of a client over to another counselor?
  16. Have you ever done any volunteer work or public education related to substance abuse or addiction disorders?
  17. If a client was under the care of another counselor at your place of employment, but that client came to you and suggested that his current counselor had made inappropriate advances toward him, how would you respond?
  18. If you were to teach a counseling intern regarding signs to observe for that may indicate signs of drug abuse, what would you tell them?
  19. Have you ever worked with clients with gambling addictions, and if so, what therapies do you find helpful?
  20. What sets you apart from other counselors and makes you the best choice of candidates for this position?
  21. If you had a client who consistently lied to you regarding his continued substance abuse, how would you handle that situation?
  22. What are you thoughts regarding involving a client's family in their treatment, and how do you go about doing that?
  23. Is there a type of patient or specific diagnosis that you find it more difficult to treat?
  24. Tell me about a time you were trusted with confidential information regarding a patient's care.
  25. If you were the person responsible for hiring new employees, what qualities would you look for in a candidate, and do you think you possess those qualities?
  26. What are some major factors that may cause a patient to relapse, and how do you approach preparing clients to cope with or avoid these risk factors?
  27. Other than individual counseling, what are some other services you have provided to clients and/or their families?
  28. Do you have experience doing group counseling sessions, and if so, what are your thoughts?
  29. If a client has a food addiction, what are some things that you like to do with them as part of their counseling?
  30. What is something that is difficult for you to deal with being an addiction counselor?
15 Addiction Counselor Answer Examples with User Answers
1.
What are some addictions that you have worked with previously and can you share something about one addiction with me?
When addictions are mentioned, many people automatically think of illegal drugs. However, there are many different addictions that addiction counselors must address. The interviewer wants to know that you are prepared to work with a variety of people who suffer from addiction. If you have a personal story, this is a good time to share it. Remember, do not use any information in your reference that may cause you to compromise patient confidentiality.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I have worked with people who have battled several different addictions. One common addiction that many people are not familiar with is food addiction. Unfortunately, it is almost as difficult to overcome that addiction is it is to overcome substances such as meth. Additionally, many people who are overcoming substance addictions often develop food addiction as a way of coping with their cravings."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I have actually spent some time working with clients with gambling addictions. It is really quite devastating to see the effect that lack of control over this addiction can bring to the lives of those who are addicted. I once had a client who lost his family's home because he used the deed for the home to fund his gambling addiction and he lost it all."
Anonymous Answer
"I've worked with people with a variety of addictions, including Methamphetamine, Opiates, Alcohol, Marijuana, and Phencyclidine (PCP). I learned a lot about alcoholism because my father was a functioning alcoholic. I've seen firsthand from a very young age, how alcoholism can ruin the lives of not only the one with the disease, but the people who care for and love them who feel helpless because they don't know how to help."
Kristine's Answer
Excellent response! Your answer will convince the interviewer you have experience with a broad range of addictions.
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2.
What would an ideal work schedule be like for you?
While you may not always be able to set your own schedule, the interviewer is offering an opportunity for you to share what would fit best for you. When you are asked a question like this, it is best to say what your favorite or most preferred schedule would be, but also remember to add that you are eager to begin work and are willing to compromise for an opportunity to become part of the team.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I am pretty open with regard to what kind of schedule I can work. I do have children and would like to spend some after school time with them. However, my spouse and I work well together to make sure that one of us is home when the other is not. Also, we have additional family resources if the children need to be supervised and neither of us is able to be home at a specific time."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My ideal work schedule would be any time on the night shift. I am not opposed to working other shifts or schedules, but I am a bit of a night owl. I also find that many people prefer to work days and my willingness to take often less favorable schedule works out for everyone. Either way, I am very excited about the possibility of becoming part of a team and would entertain any offer of employment."
Anonymous Answer
"Ideally I'd like a work schedule that starts in the mid to late morning and goes into the evening, but it is by far more important to me to begin a career in alcohol and substance abuse counseling so I'm willing to compromise in order to get that started."
Kristine's Answer
Great response! I assisted with the wording a bit to help with clarity.
"Ideally, I'd like a work schedule that starts in the mid to late morning and goes into the evening, but beginning a career in alcohol and substance abuse counseling is by far more important to me, so I'm willing to compromise to get my career started."
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3.
How would your coworkers describe you?
Questions such as this one are asked with the aim of getting you to discuss some of your qualities, perhaps hidden, that you wouldn't have mentioned if you weren't asked. Remember to share positives, but not sound conceited.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"My colleagues will tell you that I am a team player and that I am
someone they feel comfortable coming to when they need an extra hand or someone to talk to."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My supervisory experience is somewhat limited. However, I do believe those that have worked with me would say that I am approachable and that I am willing to work hard to make teamwork effective."
Anonymous Answer
"I believe my coworkers would describe me as someone who goes out of their way to help the team, someone who's a little meticulous (especially about medication) and someone who genuinely cares about all the clients individually."
Kristine's Answer
Great answer! Adding " a little" before meticulous weakens your response, so I removed that part. Otherwise, impressive response!
"I believe my coworkers would describe me as someone who goes out of their way to help the team, someone who's meticulous (especially about medication) and someone who genuinely cares about all the clients individually."
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4.
What makes you feel you will be a good fit for our organization?
Rather than just sharing how you have gone above and beyond expectations in the past, focus on how your qualities will help you meet and exceed expectations with their organization. Discuss the reasons why will you be great at this job. Talk about your qualifications and skills that will help you to do this job well. If you can, match your strengths to the requirements outlined in the job description.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I know I will be successful in this role because I have been working in this industry for five years with great training and mentorship. I have a solid understanding of X, Y, and Z (skills listed in the job description). Also, I have all of my updated certifications as outlined in your job description. I am well-prepared for this next step in my career."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I feel I have the education and skills necessary to become an asset to your organization and I believe, given the opportunity, I can prove that."
Anonymous Answer
"I feel I'd be a good fit for your organization because I care deeply about and want to help those with the disease of addiction, I take my job very seriously, but I'm not afraid to have fun when it's appropriate and most importantly I do my best to make sure I'm relating to clients on the same level and not talking down to them as I've seen other staff members do."
Kristine's Answer
Good start. You do a nice job of outlining your strengths. Be sure to mention your qualifications here as well, such as any prior work or training experiences you have with assisting those with addictions. It seems you missed a word after "care deeply about..."
"I feel I'd be a good fit for your organization because I care deeply about ___, and I want to help those with the disease of addiction. I take my job very seriously, but I'm not afraid to have fun when it's appropriate. Most importantly, I do my best to make sure I'm relating to clients on the same level and not talking down to them as I've seen other staff members do."
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5.
What made you choose a career as an Addiction Counselor?
In almost all interviews, the employer will ask why you chose this specific career. Everybody has his own story to tell, and the interviewer wants to hear yours. If you had some experience that led you to this career choice, this is a good time to share that. Remember, though, this is an interview, not a conference where you are a guest speaker. Tell your 'why' and tell it with passion, but be conscientious of the time that you are being given.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"If someone had told me many years ago that I would have chosen a career dealing with addiction, I would never have believed them. I love psychology and have always wanted to help people. It wasn't until I really began to research the different types of counseling that are available that I realized the critical role that many addiction counselors have in the lives of those who are struggling with addictions. The more I researched, the more I felt like this is what I was meant to do."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I wanted to find a career that would challenge me to grow and become a better person by giving back to others. When I started seriously thinking about my future and what possibilities there are, I really felt like if I could make a difference in just one person's life and help them overcome the stronghold of addiction, that it would be worth it all."
Anonymous Answer
"I've always been very motivated to help others, but in what capacity has never been clear until a few years ago when a college friend of mine decided to seek help for her opiate addiction. I feel like I was helpful and supportive of her as she was estranged from most of her family and other friends. In 2015, not long after she got clean, it became clear to me that I wanted to pursue addiction counseling as a career."
Kristine's Answer
Excellent response! The interviewer will see your genuine interest in pursuing the profession.
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6.
If a client began to be physically aggressive toward you, how would you handle the situation?
One of the things that people who deal with direct care, such as counselors, are faced with is the potential for a client to become angry or aggressive. It is important to understand what cues to look for that may be a precursor to aggression and know how to approach the situation before it gets out of hand. Being able to be vigilant as far as providing a safe environment for yourself and your clients and having an idea of how you will handle a possibly uncertain situation is very important. If you have ever had to deal with an angry or aggressive client, share that experience and how you dealt with it with the interviewer.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I had an experience with a client who became aggressive during a counseling session before. It can be a frightening situation, but the important thing is to remember to stay as calm as possible. Most aggression comes from fear and anxiety. If we can learn to identify signs that a patient's anxiety is increasing, we can then engage efforts to decrease those feelings and try to prevent the patient from escalating to an aggressive state."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"If a patient becomes aggressive, I always try to diffuse the situation by speaking calmly and asking them to take a moment and try to explain why they feel angry. Many times, reacting with a softer tone and giving a client an opportunity to calm down will help calm the situation before it gets out of hand."
Anonymous Answer
"You do not engage them. For example, I had one client yell at me very close to my face because I'd asked him to please bring his voice down while he was using a phone that all residents had to share usage of and some were becoming upset and anxious because of the language he was using and the volume of his voice. I didn't yell back or attempt to quiet him, I told him to please bring his voice down and to use more appropriate language in the common area then I turned around and went back behind the main desk. This resident later apologized for his behavior towards me. The main thing is to keep yourself calm as best you can in this type of situation because nothing gets solved by two people yelling (or physically fighting) at each other while becoming more and more agitated. I have seen staff argue with residents and it's very non-productive and unprofessional."
Kristine's Answer
Excellent answer! You will convince the interviewer you know how to deescalate a situation where a client begins to get aggressive. When telling a story, you want to say it way with a beginning, middle, and end. The STAR method can help with that, where S = Situation, T = Task, A = Action, and R = Result. I rearranged your response a bit so that it follows the STAR storytelling method.
"I would not engage a client who began to be physically aggressive toward me. For example, I had a client who was using a phone that all residents shared, and the language he was using and the volume of his voice was making some people upset and anxious. I asked him to please bring his voice down while he was using the phone in the common area, and he yelled at me very close to my face. I didn't yell back or attempt to quiet him. I turned around and went back behind the main desk. This resident later apologized for his behavior towards me. The main thing is to keep yourself calm as best you can in this type of situation because nothing gets solved by two people yelling at each other or physically fighting while becoming more and more agitated. I have seen staff argue with residents, and it's very non-productive and unprofessional."
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7.
What is something that is rewarding to you about being an addiction counselor?
Working a field where addictions is the focus can often have days that feel very difficult, even heartbreaking. However, there are times that something happens that can give you a feeling of assurance that all that you do is not in vain. Sharing how you feel about your job and something that makes you happy or makes you feel rewarded shows the interviewer that, despite the difficulties the job brings, you can still find the positive in what you do.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"This job is rewarding to me in so many ways. More than anything, I am happy and thankful when I see someone who has been my client who actually goes through rehab and begins counseling and then chooses to stay in a life of sobriety free from drugs and alcohol. There have been times when some of my previous clients have stopped by or called just to tell me that they are ok and that they are living a clean life and how their lives have changed. This is one of the most rewarding feelings I have ever experienced."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I love being an addiction counselor. I don't love the fact that we are needed, but because we are, I pour everything into my job. One of the most rewarding things for me is seeing someone who graduates from rehab and decides to initiate counseling for himself. Taking personal initiative to continue with therapy and make a conscious effort to get sober and clean and to stay that way takes a lot of effort for the addict, and seeing that is more rewarding than I can even explain."
Anonymous Answer
"Watching current and former clients struggle through the initial rehabilitation process and not get dissuaded by the difficulty and come out of it with a strong desire to stay clean is extremely rewarding to watch. Knowing I played a part within a team of people who are dedicated to helping people with the disease of addiction is satisfying beyond words."
Kristine's Answer
Excellent response! You will convince the interviewer this profession is highly rewarding for you.
"Watching current and former clients struggle through the initial rehabilitation process and not get dissuaded by the difficulty and come out of it with a strong desire to stay clean is extremely rewarding to watch. Knowing I played a part within a team of people dedicated to helping people with the disease of addiction is satisfying beyond words."
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8.
If you had a client who told you he was only coming to counseling because he was ordered to by a judge and that he had no intention of quitting drugs, how would you handle the situation?
Unfortunately, there are a number of people who are addicted to illegal substances who only attend rehab and counseling because it is court-ordered, rather than choosing to do so on their own. This is not to say that when someone is ordered to go to counseling, rather than choosing it for themselves, that it will not be effective. However, with those cases, many addiction counselors are faced with the task of not only battling the addiction but the addict's opposition to treatment. The interviewer wants to know that you are able to address a situation like this professionally.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Being understanding is key to working with any client. With someone fighting addiction, it is especially important. When someone with a substance abuse addiction comes for treatment, it is not always because they want to. Whether it is court-ordered or the family gives an ultimatum, many of them come in unwilling. However, there are times that, even if they come to us with some resistance, with support and encouragement, they begin to see some hope of what life can be like if they are drug free. Knowing this information, I always try to be sympathetic to their fears, but also offer them a look at what they can accomplish if they overcome their addictions. Confrontation never works; so, if someone tells me they are not going to stop using, I tell them it is their right, but while they are with me, we still have to address what could result with continued use and the possibility of what life could be like without drugs."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Despite my personal feelings, it is the client's right to do what he wants when he has finished treatment. However, while the client is in my care, I will attempt to address as many things as I can with regard to his feelings of needing to use drugs rather than live independent of them. Many times, people with addictions to drugs get to a point that their body needs the drug so much that they can't seem to imagine life without it. I will spend what time I am allowed with the client offering alternatives to drug use and encouraging him to use resources available with the hope that, although he may initially be there because the court ordered him, perhaps he will begin to see the importance of living a drug free life and opt to continue with rehabilitation efforts."
Anonymous Answer
"I would start by asking questions in an effort to help them gain insight into the importance of getting and staying clean, inform them that I can't stop them if that's what they want to do, but that we're here when they decide they're ready to take the rehabilitation serious. I'd also explain the future consequences of continued use including declining health, estrangement from family and friends, homelessness, legal problems and possibly death."
Kristine's Answer
Great answer! Your answer shows you know how to communicate with a client who is only seeing you because of a court order. When responding to your interviewer's question, try to use their words at the beginning of your response like I did in your revised response.
"If I were working with someone who was only there because it was court-ordered, I would start by asking questions to help them gain insight into the importance of getting and staying clean. I would also inform them that I can't stop them if that's what they want to do and that we're here when they decide they're ready to take the rehabilitation seriously. I'd also explain the potential future consequences of continued use, including declining health, estrangement from family and friends, homelessness, legal problems, and death."
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9.
Have you or a loved one ever been directly affected by an addiction?
Many times an interviewer will ask a question related to your career choice like this. Having been affected by an addiction is not a disqualifier for employment, so don't be alarmed if you have a personal history of addiction. The rationale behind this kind of question is to see how well you relate to someone who is suffering from a condition for which you are providing treatment. If you've never been affected, that's fine. You have the qualifications to help those who are, or you wouldn't be in this interview. If you have, however, this would be a good opportunity for you to share your thoughts and to display an attitude of true empathy for those who are struggling. Either way, just be honest and show a true desire to help others.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"While I have never personally been affected by addiction, I do have loved ones who have been. In fact, my brother is part of the reason I decided to become an addiction counselor. He has battled with addictions of one kind or another for years. From alcohol to methamphetamine, the effects that these addictions have had have been far reaching."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I can work with people one on one as well as in groups. I think active listening is so important as an addiction counselor. It shows the patient that you are taking the time to listen to them. The same goes for my colleagues!"
Anonymous Answer
"Yes. I developed an addiction to opioid pain medicine after a car accident in 2001."
Kristine's Answer
The interviewer will appreciate your honesty! If you feel comfortable, you may tie your experience to your choice to pursue the profession or explain how your experiences have helped you empathize with clients.
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10.
Do you anticipate any changes in your life within the next 2-3 years that may prevent you from continuing employment here?
Knowing what goals you have and any changes you anticipate in your life will give the interviewer an opportunity to evaluate two things: 1. what positions are available that won't disrupt your plans and, 2. are you interested in having a long-term relationship within the company? Either way, being upfront and honest is always appreciated.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I recently became engaged. Although we have not set a date yet, we have agreed to wait twelve months before the marriage. My fiance' just passed the Bar exam here and has been offered an opportunity to join an existing law firm. Presently, our plans are to stay where we are and build a career, not just work a job. Also, we do not plan on having children for at least two years after our marriage. We both feel that being able to become established in our careers and save for our future would be the responsible thing to do before starting a family."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My boss would describe me as a motivated individual. Motivated to help my patients, motivated to lead in a positive work environment as well as better myself as a clinician and person."
Anonymous Answer
"No, I do not anticipate any changes in my personal life in the next 2-3 years. Pursuing and achieving my goal of becoming an Addiction Counselor is too important to have plans to work somewhere for only a short period of time."
Kristine's Answer
Great response! You will reassure your interviewer you are committed to working in the role for the company in the foreseeable future.
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11.
Have you ever considered choosing a different specialty?
Many employee candidates are unsure of how to answer this question. Most feel that if they say they may have other interests that the interviewer will not recommend them for employment. This is not necessarily the case. This is simply an opportunity for the interviewer to get to know your interests.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I have never considered any career other than addiction counseling. I am happy to take classes and continue my education, perhaps for an advanced degree that may go hand in hand with my current role, but I am not interested in changing my specialty."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Actually, I had initially thought that I would become a pediatrician. Something about counseling and helping those with addictions was just very intriguing to me and I knew I wanted to make a career in this specialty area."
Anonymous Answer
"I used to want to become a certified medical coder. This was back in the late '90s."
Kristine's Answer
Good start. Try to elaborate a bit so that the interviewer can understand more about your interests. Why were you considering becoming a certified medical coder? What was appealing about it? Why did you ultimately choose the path to become an addiction counselor?
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12.
What are your thoughts about inpatient treatment facilities, and what do you think could make the chances of staying in recovery better for clients after they have been discharged from inpatient care?
Because of insurance restrictions, most inpatient rehabilitation facility stays are usually only 28-30 days. While there are options for counseling and continued care after discharge from these facilities, not everyone participates. This question gives you an opportunity to tell the interviewer things that you think are important in helping clients to establish a pattern that promotes recovery long after the client has been discharged from a treatment facility. Share your thoughts.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I believe the care provided in inpatient facilities is crucial, especially during the initial detoxification process. These facilities offer medically supervised detox and symptom management. They are also introduced to counselors and social workers who begin to make care plans and preparations for discharge to a longer term therapy in an effort to promote sobriety among clients. While not everyone is willing to continue with outpatient therapy or private counseling, I do feel if a strong foundation of counseling and stress management can begin during the inpatient phase, many clients will opt for continued care. 30 days is a drop in the bucket with regard to the amount of time that it takes to truly become strong enough to fight addiction and any support that can be offered outside of the initial inpatient treatment is always a step toward a stronger client."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I feel that inpatient facilities provide a great foundation for those suffering from addiction to begin recovery. It's important to remember, though, that living free from addiction is a daily battle that an addict must fight. Therefore, I truly feel that it is my job as a counselor to encourage clients to participate in after-care programs such as IOP (Intensive Outpatient Program), personal counseling and family counseling. Any support that can be provided to a client to help reduce the triggers that he is subjected to is one more step toward us helping them live a life free of addiction."
Anonymous Answer
"Setting realistic goals for the next hour, day, week or year. I believe it's important in the first 1-2 years of recovery for people to keep busy. Some things clients can do to increase the odds of staying in recovery include: Get a job (maybe 2 jobs), starting an exercise routine, volunteering, consistently going to AA or NA meetings, establishing a new network of friends who are supportive, understanding and are a positive influence in your life."
Kristine's Answer
Great response! The interviewer will be impressed by your knowledge and expertise in recovery. I assisted a bit with wording to ensure clarity.
"Patients can increase their chances of recovery by setting realistic goals for the next hour, day, week, or year. I believe it's essential in the first 1-2 years of recovery for people to keep busy. Some things clients can do to increase the odds of staying in recovery include: Getting a job, or possibly two jobs, starting an exercise routine, volunteering, consistently going to AA or NA meetings, and establishing a new network of friends who are supportive, understanding, and a positive influence in your life."
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13.
Has there ever been a time that you had a disagreement with a coworker, and if so, how was it resolved?
Any time you work with someone else, there is a chance of having a disagreement about something at one time or another. The interviewer knows this. It's human nature for people to have their own opinions. What is important to the interviewer in this question is whether or not you are willing to compromise and work through difficult situations with your co-workers. Being unwilling to compromise or find alternative solutions to a dispute can affect everyone on the team, even if it is indirectly. Sharing a personal experience is OK, but do not embellish it to 'be the hero.'

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I believe if we think about it, each of us could remember at least one disagreement with a friend or co-worker. Although I consider myself to be pretty easy-going, I am also very passionate about my patients and the care that they receive. I have been aware of disagreements between other co-workers, but really like to think of myself as more of a peacekeeper. I feel like professional people should be able to discuss things logically and come to an agreement that is satisfactory for everyone involved."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I am usually a very soft-spoken person and strive to be the 'peacekeeper.' I can't recall any specific incident of a disagreement."
Anonymous Answer
"Once we were looking for a co-worker who happened to be Med RA that night, and I found him hiding in a darkened office that had no cameras in it. I just confronted him about it and asked him to please make himself more available when not doing medication-related tasks because we needed his help at the main desk when it wasn't med time."
Kristine's Answer
Great start. It's possible the interviewer will not know what Med RA means, so go ahead and define it. The word "confronted" may have a bit of a hostile or aggressive undertone, so you may want to choose different wording. Since you're telling a story here, use the STAR response method, and elaborate on the result. How did your co-worker respond? Did you repeat the same behavior in the future?
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14.
What characteristics do you think are important for an addiction counselor to possess?
There is more than one reason for asking this question. First, the interviewer wants to know what qualities you think are important to perform this job. Second, and most importantly, your answer will tell the interviewer if you hold yourself to the same standard as you do others. If you want to see certain characteristics in your peers, you should be able to tell the interviewer with confidence that you possess those traits, as well. This question is one that interviewers often use to distinguish sincerity on the part of the candidate.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I believe that honesty is important no matter what job title a person holds. I have found that being honest with people creates an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. Those qualities, I feel, are essential when building rapport with patients and co-workers."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Confidence is one thing I think is important. It's hard to believe in someone who doesn't believe in themselves. I believe if a patient is comfortable with a provider's ability to perform it will make following a plan of care easier."
Anonymous Answer
"Being assertive, willingness to learn and the ability to adapt quickly to new and different situations daily."
Kristine's Answer
Great response! You outline three specific characteristics an addiction counselor needs. I assisted with the wording a bit to help with clarity.
"I think a successful addiction counselor must be assertive, be willing to learn, and be able to adapt quickly to new situations."
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15.
Under what circumstances would you feel that you need to turn the care of a client over to another counselor?
Treating clients with addiction disorders can become a very personal task. These clients come to you during very vulnerable times. Building trust and establishing a solid counselor/client relationship is important. However, there are instances when circumstances arise that may lead you to refer the client to another counselor or doctor for continued care. The interviewer wants to know that you can identify these times and that you are capable of handling the transition professionally.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"There are a few reasons I can think of that would make it necessary to turn the care of a client over to another counselor. One that is common is when a client begins to form an attachment to me that appears to be close to the line of being inappropriate. I don't believe that this is ever truly intentional for a client. Nevertheless, when one addiction is being addressed, clients often tend to replace those addictions and 'needs' with other things that satisfy that longing. For many addicts, the emotional support that we, as counselors, offer is often something that drives the client to feel an increased need to be with us. Therefore, when I feel that a client is beginning to develop an unhealthy attachment to me, I always refer to the attending psychiatrist on staff and ask for his input and recommendation for transfer of care."
Ryan's Answer #2
"Personally, I thrive in a team environment. I see team projects as an opportunity to learn new skills!"
Anonymous Answer
"For example, if it's determined that the client needs a higher level of care than the counselor is not adequately trained for. Also, if a dual relationship exists such as the client is a family member, friend or business associate."
Kristine's Answer
Great response! The interviewer will see there are clear situations where you would welcome others to care for a client. I assisted with wording in a few places to help with clarity.
"I would be willing to turn a client over to the care of someone else if we determined the client needed a higher level of care, and I did not have adequate training to serve their needs. Also, I would reveal if a dual relationship existed with a client, such as if the client was a family member, friend, or business associate. That way, they could be assigned to someone else without a conflicting interest."
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