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Top 30 Addiction Counselor Interview Questions

Question 1 of 30
In your previous counseling experience, have you ever had to enforce policies you didn't agree with?
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Question 2 of 30
As an Addiction Counselor, what do you believe is your best asset?
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"I believe that my best asset is the fact that I am a huge proponent to continued education. When I received my Masters' in Counseling, I did not stop there. On average, I take 3 additional courses or workshops per year."
This is another way of the interviewer asking why they should hire you, over any other applicant. Think about the skills and qualities that you bring, which others may not have. Perhaps its your counseling style, a transferable skill, or even the fact that you speak 3 languages! Explain the trait and how it makes a difference to your patients.
More Answer Examples
Entry Level Example
"My best asset is in my critical thinking skills. I'm able to make quick and clear decisions that make an impact in times of crisis."
Experienced Example
"In addition to being a seasoned addictions counselor who has trained other counselors, I am also fluent in 3 languages: English, French, and Spanish. My linguistic skills have allowed me to help a wider range of patients during my career."
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Question 3 of 30
What motivates you to succeed?
Professional Answers Preview
"Having a new clinician working alongside me motivates me to succeed and set a high standard for them."
In the counseling field, many people are motivated by the satisfaction that comes from helping others. If this is you, elaborate on​ how helping others keeps you focused and helps you to keep going, even when you might feel discouraged. Examples help the interviewer see your motivation in action. If you can show them how helping others has driven you towards achieving success in the past, your interviewer can get to know you that much better and feel more confident in your skills.
More Answer Examples
Entry Level Example
"I consider myself a self-motivated individual who is constantly striving to be better and do better. My motivation is also kept high by being surrounded by experienced and enthusiastic leaders. I often draw my inspiration from those leaders."
Experienced Example
"What motivates me to succeed is seeing success in others. I am a natural leader and mentor so when I see a counseling student or addictions patient excelling in an area where they may have struggled prior to my help, I feel a true sense of pride and accomplishment."
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Question 4 of 30
How do you cope with stressful situations?
Professional Answers Preview
"I have learned to stay relaxed and try not to react. I know what situations make me stressed, and I know how to respond. Typically if I am overwhelmed with too much work or a tight deadline, I prioritize tasks that need to get done each day. Ensuring that I use my time wisely and that I have realistic expectations, are very important keys to reducing my stress."
The life of an addiction counselor can be stressful! Watching patients struggle can be painful and you may often feel under pressure. Dealing with family members and managing support groups can also be a lot to handle. Show the interviewer that you are capable of coping with stress by sharing the tools or strategies that help you stay calm.
More Answer Examples
Entry Level Example
"If I'm facing a stressful situation I'll call in the reinforcements. I ask for help when appropriate to avoid situations from getting out of control."
Experienced Example
"Stress is part of any demanding job and I embrace it to the fullest. I take good care of myself personally and prioritize my workload to maintain a healthy balance in my stress levels. As a counselor, it is especially important that I have a personal lifeline and maintain appropriate boundaries with my patients and their situations."
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Question 5 of 30
Why do you want a career as an addiction counselor?
Professional Answers Preview
"I grew up in a family that had generational struggles with addiction. A big motivator for me was to learn everything I could about addictions, and the genetic link to the behavior of an addict. I wanted to break my own family's cycle of addiction, while helping others at the same time."
You most likely chose this career for a very specific reason. Consider your motivation to help people and your drive to learn new, innovative therapy techniques. Where did that motivation come from? Perhaps you struggled with addiction in your past, or have seen a loved one fight a battle with addiction. As an Addiction Counselor, you will be assisting others in​ facing difficult issues which means you need to have a solid motivator, and a strong desire to keep moving forward on the toughest days. If you have a personal story that directed you towards addiction counseling, share it!
More Answer Examples
Entry Level Example
"When majoring in Psychology, I found my substance abuse classes very interesting. I decided I wanted to learn more from patients and the effects substances have on their bodies. I am very excited to continue learning in this role as an addiction counselor."
Experienced Example
"After being sober for the last 5 years I decided to give back by helping others with the same struggles I had. When I was taking counseling for my own addiction, my coach was a significant source of strength and help all along the way. I want to be that for someone, too."
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Question 6 of 30
How often do you take work home with you?
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Question 7 of 30
What three words would you use to describe yourself?
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Question 8 of 30
What was your biggest disappointment as an addiction counselor?
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Question 9 of 30
Describe your working relationship with your previous or current colleagues.
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Question 10 of 30
How did you hear about this position?
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Question 11 of 30
What do you like to do outside of work.
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Question 12 of 30
What tools do you use to monitor your treatments?
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Question 13 of 30
Do you have any questions for us?
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Question 14 of 30
Do you have difficulty working in a team environment?
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Question 15 of 30
Do you think honesty is always the best policy?
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Question 16 of 30
How do you manage a large workload?
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Question 17 of 30
How would your boss describe you?
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Question 18 of 30
Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
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Question 19 of 30
What are your strengths?
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Question 20 of 30
What is your greatest weakness?
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Question 21 of 30
What is your greatest accomplishment as an addiction counselor?
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Question 22 of 30
What do you feel is the most important skill an addiction counselor should possess?
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Question 23 of 30
How do you handle angry patients?
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Question 24 of 30
How do you involve the patient's family during treatment?
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Question 25 of 30
Have you facilitated any outreach programs? Tell me about it.
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Question 26 of 30
What type of patient are you not comfortable being around?
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Question 27 of 30
What types of patients do you have the most difficulty treating?
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Question 28 of 30
How would your co-workers describe your attention to detail?
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Question 29 of 30
What new therapy approaches have you recently tried?
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Question 30 of 30
What is your current salary?
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User-Submitted Interview Answers

Question 1 of 30
In your previous counseling experience, have you ever had to enforce policies you didn't agree with?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
After a client missed two consecutive group counseling sessions they would be placed on case review regardless of the situation. While I agree setting boundaries are good it does not allow the clinical team to treat clients on a case by case basis. This is important to individualizing their treatment and building rapport.
2.
I struggle with informing certain referral sources of clients who have relapses, knowing they will possibly incarcerate them rather then giving them the option of a higher level of care.
3.
In my organization we were required to give all clients a diagnoses in order for them to receive services. While most of the youth did indeed have a legitimate diagnoses there were some that just needed extra transitional services (housing, edu., skills building, etc.) I dealt with this by diagnosing a lot of PSTD, since most of these youth had exp. Trauma in their lives and by being extremely clear that a diagnoses does not define a person. I worry that many young people, people in general, here their diagnoses and internalize it, which creates more harm than benefits.
4.
I tend to follow policy of the agency.
5.
Having to break confidentiality in order to report any reports of harm to themselves or others. This can be a challenging situation as it may break the clients trust with you and may impede their progress or the continuation of counselling sessions.
6.
INo cell phones on site for clients and staff.
7.
My field experience involved a lot of work with COA who had similar childhoods to my own. There were so many times where I had to hold myself back from hugging them because of course that was a policy.
8.
Eating after the meal not being able to participate in community events.
9.
At the youth assessment centre I did not agree with a policy that stated students who fell on sick program had homework after school.
10.
I do not yet have any counseling experience.
11.
I cannot say that I did not agree with any of the policies that I had to follow. These policies helped foster growth, trust, and safety for the clients.
12.
I am not comfortable when people speak other language in work place.
13.
No call no shows can be thrown out of the program, then referred elsewhere.
14.
One of the policies that I did not necessarily agree with was that we were to be vague in our correspondence with courts.
15.
Truthfully, at Serenity House, I believed each and every policy put in place was there for a purpose. The purpose of keeping our residents safe, structured and accountable for their behavior.
Question 2 of 30
As an Addiction Counselor, what do you believe is your best asset?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I am very compassionate, and non judgmental.
2.
My best asset is my ability to actively listen and provide encouragement and hope to my clients.
3.
My ability to be empathetic. I am able to listen and join with the client, even when I do not necessarily agree with his or her beliefs.
4.
I have a capacity to really listen, to absorb information well, and also to analyze. This sounds so simple, but it can be so hard to do well. I think I good at approaching people. At giving them lifelines if they want them, at offering help without smothering and overwhelming people. At the end of the day, it is the human connection that counts. I want people to feel understood, and I am good at keeping this my top priority.
5.
Active listening and knowing community resources.
6.
My genuiness and listening skills.
7.
I believe that my listening skills are key.
8.
My best asset is my caring attitude and my ability not to judge others. I believe in the importance of accepting clients for who they are, without ever judging them.
9.
As a Addiction counselor my best asset is the ability to listen and provide support and understanding to the client.
10.
I thing that my best asset is being patient and understandable person.
11.
The ability to build rapport and relate to the clients.
12.
My best asset is my ability to relate to my clients like a human being to another human being, while at the same time maintaining my professionalism, and this is why I establish rapport with clients so easily. I make it clear that I am not any better than my clients, I am simply someone who happens to be doing this type of work and is doing their job.
13.
My best asset I would say is my motivation to inspire and help people.
14.
My wiliness to work to make a change in someones life.
15.
Patience co opetation devision maker.
Question 3 of 30
What motivates you to succeed?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
The presence of the problem provides opportunity to be creative to facilitate its resolution.
2.
I did not agree with the policy that clients could not take mental health medication while in treatment. But I understand their beliefs regarding mental health medications and how they effect treatment.
3.
I am motivated by the possibility of transformation and liberation. I think that counselling is one piece of an equation that can help us do this. I want for all of us to be able to transform ourselves and our own worlds when necessary, when old structures no longer serve the functions we had hoped. This to me is exciting and renewing.
4.
Positive outcomes or any hope of success.
5.
Seeing the patients I work with change their behaviors and become successful.
6.
I am motivated by my desire to help others and to give them my best. In addition, because of my spiritual beliefs, I believe that God motivates me every day to be my best, and my goal is to serve others to the best of my abilities.
7.
I can see in clients what they cant see in themselves.
8.
To feel I have completed what I sat out to do( complete my goals)
9.
My family and my personal grow.
10.
I have an inner ability to be self motivated, but my daughter is my biggest motivation in life.
11.
The opportunity to be able to support someone who needs it. I strive to improve and be a better professional every day.
12.
My consistency to to reach my goal. I am not afraid of hard work. I put myself to the test on a daily base in order to achieve my goal.
13.
What motivates me to succeed is providing hope for people. In our world today there are so many people who struggle and I hope to be someone who can provide the support and empowerment that they need.
14.
What motivates me to succeed are the people I work with. I want to see people be the best that they can be. When a client needs some motivation, encouragement, resources or information, I want to be able to provide them with all of this.
15.
My personal life experience, my grandchildren my faith.
Question 4 of 30
How do you cope with stressful situations?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Yes I can remain calm and concise during a stressful event. I allow myself to debrief after the event.
2.
Yes, I am able to cope with a stressful situation by implementing a variety of self-coping strategies and collaborating with tothers.
3.
I able to cope with stressful situations.
4.
Yes. I have survived the stress of multiple different life situations. I have had stressful jobs, stressful degrees, stressful health stuff in my family etc. I feel stress, but have learned to find ways of channelling it through me rather than letting it build up. I have developed skills from my activism work and from my social work background which have helped me to recognize my own personal signs of stress.
5.
I believe that I am very capable of dealing with stressful situations.
6.
Yes I am able to cope with stressful situations.
7.
Yes. The fiel of addicitons is a stressful one in itself. But seeing just one succeeds make all the stress worth it.
8.
Yes, I have been in stressful situations before in the work place and I find that it is always best to remain calm and focus on priority situations first.
9.
Yes I have been in a variety of situations where quick decisive decisions must be made.
10.
I believe in the importance of stress-reduction exercises, such as deep breathing, short physical exercise (running in place), and thought-stopping, which I would use to calm clients down. In addition, it might even be necessary to move them to different environments (from one room to another, or, if possible, from indoors to outdoors) in order to calm them down. Yes, I can cope with stressful situations.
11.
Yes, The whole time I was attending college I also had a full time job which made life very stressful. However, I have great coping skills to deal with stress in a positive way.
12.
Yes I am by being calm myself in situation like this I found to be most effective.
13.
Yes, I have always been able to cope with stress and the times when I felt overwhelmed. I would utilize some stress management techniqes.
14.
Yes I am emotionally stable.
15.
Usually, I remain calm in stressful situations and focus on the issue at hand, afterwards, I take the time to process it and debrief.
Question 5 of 30
Why do you want a career as an addiction counselor?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I have a lot of background education and experience in the addiction field, I am a compassionate worker towards clients needs, I have worked in the addiction field past five years. I really like to help others.
2.
I want to be able to offer hope, and encouragement to people with addictions.
3.
To help people and give them a platform to share their story that will leadf to recovery.
4.
I have always found joy in helping others especially those who are lost to addiction.
5.
I want a career as an addiction counselor because I want to help the individual get their lives back.
6.
It is my desire and passion to bring hope and help those find thier way back from addiciton.
7.
I have always felt the desire to be of help to others.
8.
I want to help people overcome their addictions.
9.
I am a recovering addict myself and I understand how hard it is to get clean. Love nothing more than to help others in their recovery.
10.
I want to help people get better and improve their quality of life.
11.
I want to provide support to those who need it. It is esstiential for people to know they have someone they can condifdide in and uspport them through a difficult time.
12.
I am an addict myself and I believe I can help others with my own personal experience.
13.
Because I feel I can be the most help in this area because I have a good rapport with people mand genuinely want to help without looking down on the individual.
14.
Because I love work with and help people.
15.
I have been interested in this field for several years, for alcohol/drug addiction has affected my family for several years. I believe that I have the knowledge, education, as well as experience with this field.
Question 6 of 30
How often do you take work home with you?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I find it hard to make decisions where there is only an illusion of choice and it is obvious that all the options are bad ones that would all see the client in a worse situation. When there is hope for something better It is so much easier to help make decisions with clients.
2.
What I am going to wear how can I be part of the solution and not the problem.
3.
Making decisions to that will help others is easier. Difficult decisions would have to be anything dealing with my children. I want to make the best decision for them and not mess up. I want to get it right the first time.
4.
Deciding the right level of care for our clients I find the least chanllnging. Some of the most diffivutl decisons I havre hasd ot make our discharging a patieny.
5.
Every day routine decisions. The most difficult are decisions that you are faced with that you have not encountered before.
6.
I have to look at each client as an individual;therefore, I cannot make a decision that is best for the client without doing an assessment. I believe it is difficult to help clients make decisions unless I am able to look at the results of their assessments. Of course, in crisis situations, it would not always be possible to do an assessment, so I need to be prepared for any situation that comes my way. If I were to encounter any difficulty making a decision, I would seek help from my supervisor.
7.
Decisions that are made with adequate time a.
8.
The easiest decisions that I have to make are the ones that effect me directly. I find it more difficult to make a decision when it would effect others.
9.
Whether or not the client is receptive and benefiting from the disscussions. What should be done.
10.
Decisions that are easy for me to make usually when the situation will cause no problem for another person and vice versal.
11.
To refer a client to an more intensive treatment program when they need it. The most difficult is testify against my client in court for non-complain w/ tx. Recommendations.
12.
The easiest decisions are those that will directly have an affect on my immediate family. The most difficult are the ones that I have to give up on a goal that I have long awaited, due to unforeseen circumstances.
13.
The easiest: routine client stuff such as meal chores and what to cook. Difficult: figuring out how I can be a part of the solution for a client when she is facing a difficult situation, rather than part of the problem.
14.
Easiest would be the type of help/resources I would offer and the most difficult would be to tell the addict that I could not help them.
15.
The easier decision for me to make was being on time for this interview.
Question 7 of 30
What three words would you use to describe yourself?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Caring, Empathic, and Present.
2.
Determined, honest, compassionate.
3.
Empathetic, mindful and non-judgemental.
4.
Caring, strong minded, and dependable.
5.
Empathic, comitted and dependable.
6.
Goal-driven, team player, adaptable.
7.
Observant intuitive passionate.
8.
Caring, committed and tough.
9.
Hard-working, dedicated, caring.
10.
Conscientious, committed, empathetic.
11.
Helpful, Intelligent, Empathetic.
12.
Compassionate, Open-minded, Honest.
13.
Reliable, caring and Consistent.
14.
Humble, good listening, emphaty.
15.
Friendly, Compassionate and goal oriented.
Question 8 of 30
What was your biggest disappointment as an addiction counselor?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I can not say that I have had a disappointing moment in this field, just situations to learn and grow from in the future.
2.
Having young clients who have died of overdose. Nothing has bothered me more than that as a worker. It has strengthened my conviction in harm reduction approaches and in the need for people to be well educated and informed about the substances they use and ways to mitigate risk.
3.
When I found myself telling a client what to do instead of letting them make their own decision.
4.
The revolving door that is addiciton.
5.
Working hard to help a patient change their behavior and watching them continually face barriers.
6.
I have no experience in this field.
7.
Problem would be to not be able to help a client.
8.
Helping others and not helping my youngest brother who was addicted.
9.
Watching someone go back into an addiction, after working so very hard.
10.
The way our legal system and society criminalize and stigmatize addiction. I hope one day a more compassionate approach will be used and it will be seen as a health issue to be addressed through treatment, like any other health condition.
11.
Not landing a job after receiving my degree.
12.
My biggest disappointment would have to be when I saw a client relapse. Part of me felt as though I could have done more to prevent this. However with this relapse, I practiced motivational interviewing and relapse prevention with my client.
13.
My biggest disappointment was when a client relapsed. A part of me felt as though I was not doing my job. I had to remember that it was the client who made the choice. I then practiced relapse prevention with the client and provided encouragement through motivational interviewing.
14.
Watching people not even try.
15.
Losing a client to the disease.
Question 9 of 30
Describe your working relationship with your previous or current colleagues.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I work great in a team, as well as individually. I am a people person so working with others comes naturally, I can get along with all sorts of people coming from different backgrounds.
2.
Very well, I have a variety of experience working with both women and men. While volunteering at Ray of Hopes community centre I was able to build relationships with those who came in.
3.
I am a great team player understanding that it is necessary for the collaborative effort of the whole to enlist the success of the program. I seek to bring out the best in oters and their ideas.
4.
Very well. One of my passions is community organizing and creating change together. I believe in the importance of being good to other people and in the potential this can have to shift the world into a better place. I like to make a point of being honest, of working hard, and finding common vision with others.
5.
I work very well with ohter. I am a team player, and am committed to those who suffer w/addiciton, mh.
6.
I work great with people. I am a team player and I am always willing to lend a hand to my coworkers.
7.
I am a people-person, and I enjoy working with lots of different people, especially those who are from different cultural backgrounds than I am. I feel that I work equally well on my own and as part of a team.
8.
How much do I help them? I dont know but I know they help me and I enjoy working with them.
9.
I have a good rapport with people and meet people where they are.
10.
I love work with people, they respect me and follow up the rules.
11.
I am great with people and build rapport easily with 9 out of 10 individuals.
12.
I generally work well individually as well as a part of a team. I am able to take leadership when necessary. Usually I am the one who brings fresh, new ideas and approaches to the team.
13.
I consider myself as a people person.
14.
Since I am a people person, I really enjoy interacting with others and being a team player.
15.
I work very well with people. As an easy-going person I am always willing to give and take advice and suggestions from others.
Question 10 of 30
How did you hear about this position?
Question 11 of 30
What do you like to do outside of work.
Question 12 of 30
What tools do you use to monitor your treatments?
Question 13 of 30
Do you have any questions for us?
Question 14 of 30
Do you have difficulty working in a team environment?
Question 15 of 30
Do you think honesty is always the best policy?
Question 16 of 30
How do you manage a large workload?
Question 17 of 30
How would your boss describe you?
Question 18 of 30
Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
Question 19 of 30
What are your strengths?
Question 20 of 30
What is your greatest weakness?
Question 21 of 30
What is your greatest accomplishment as an addiction counselor?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Understanding the transformative power of empathy. Being able to vicariously experience life through the addict lends to a general detachment from self, deepens psychological assessment and treatment planning while providing a powerful platform for trust.
2.
Privilege of offering support to people seeking help.
3.
The trust and rapport I build with my clients.
4.
Seeing a patient through their recovery and watching them succeed.
5.
Being useful to others, sharing my experience, my struggles and victories.
6.
As a counselor, was to know that I can help to make a difference in the lives of others.
7.
Seeing a client being married and having a wonderful and stable life after being in treatment.
8.
Building Rapport and comfort.
9.
Being there for someone who needs support.
10.
That I was able to give resources to a family that accepted the help and the follow through with the family.
11.
My greatest achievement was returning to school and achieving my Doctor degree.
12.
My greatest accomplishment was when I helped a client come to a major life decision. I used motivational interviewing and had the client go through the pros and cons of this situation. At the end, she came to her decision and I saw how positive she felt about it.
13.
Achieving my Masters Degree and working towards becoming licensed.
14.
Seeing someone get their 10 year sobriety chip.
15.
My greatest accomplishment as an addiction counselor was the process I went through as I helped a shy, unhappy girl become a more lively, talkative client who wanted to see me and talk with me about her struggles but also her successes. It was humbling to look back and see all of the progress that she had made from the beginning and then to the end of our time together.
Question 22 of 30
What do you feel is the most important skill an addiction counselor should possess?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Being persistent and patient, even when/if the client relapses or is resistant to treatment.
2.
Listening and knowing therapeutic models.
3.
Genuine and attentive and trust.
4.
Great listening skills and empathy.
5.
Counselors need to be knowledgeable about drugs and alcohol and their effects, and they need to be knowledgeable in various treatment approaches. Without these basic skills, counselors cannot provide effective treatments.
6.
Being a listener and being empathetic, not looking down at the client Making them feel they are less important.
7.
Having empathy and showing compassion to help others cope with their addictions.
8.
Ability to listen nonjudgementally.
9.
Humility. Even though we may have degrees and licensure in addictions, clients still may give us new insight and allow us to learn and to grow. Having the knowledge that there is still a lot that we do not yet know about addiction can lead us to truly come alongside and understand people, and in turn, learn and be changed by talking with the client.
10.
An addictions counselor should always be a good listener.
11.
I believe the most important skill an addiction counsellor should possess is honest. To be honest with your clients means you should also be honest with yourself.
12.
The ability to listen and the ability to identify strengths in people. Addiction often has an impact on self-esteem so people sometimes do not see the strengths that they possess.
13.
I feel like the counselor needs to be disciplined.
14.
Listening, not only the words being spoken, but also what isn't said. This takes a great amount of patience and the ability to ask the right questions.
15.
Flexible with approaches as people are impacted differently. And the capability to be non judgmental.
Question 23 of 30
How do you handle angry patients?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
First of all, will not fall down to their level. Politely I will try to calm them down and try to help out with any issue I can help with.
2.
By validating their concerns and if possible providing solutions and or time out.
3.
First I work at understanding why they are angry. I want to acknowledge those feelings and give space for them. Anger can be productive and helpful. I think it is important not to be afraid of it.
4.
Let them be and not engage until the situation has de-escalated.
5.
I try to descalate the situation, or difuse it, by speaking to the patient and giving them choices, based on their behavior.
6.
I have never been in that situation, but I would try to calm them down and then attempt to see what is aggravating them.
7.
Calm and straightforward.
8.
Try to diffuse the situation, by being calm my self.
9.
I just relax, listen careful, and wait until he/she express or display their anger.
10.
By allowing them the time to deescalate and still be there for them when they are ready to open up.
11.
I try to calm them down and de-escalate the situation. Afterwards, we discuss what happened and next steps.
12.
We go through breathing excursus.
13.
By allowing them to express themselves, in helping them to speak openly in order for them to calm down.
14.
I am a rather calm person, so when a client gets angry I will hear them out. If it were to get to the point that I began the anger was geared toward myself, I would assert myself and let the client know that their behaviour is becoming inappropriate. If the client were to persist, I would remove myself from the situation by either asking the client to leave or leaving the room myself. I would alert a supervisor or anyone in the surrounding area that there is violent client in order to provide the best safety for everyone.
15.
Try to deescaluate the matter, make sure the environment around me is safe.
Question 24 of 30
How do you involve the patient's family during treatment?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Not unless the patient gives me consent to talk to their family regarding a specific issue, and that information will benefit the patients treatment.
2.
Not unless that is part of the mandated program. I do not find that this is necessary.
3.
If patient has given permission and a situation warrants it.
4.
I do if the patient wants this and I have the patient sign a release or information.
5.
General progress reports.
6.
Yes, because if one member have the problem it effects others members in the family as well.
7.
Only if the patient has signed a consent.
8.
When necessary and appropriate releases have been signed to do so.
9.
I've consulted with family only if the patient has given written consent.
10.
No I would not want to breach confidentality.
11.
Not unless the patient is under 18
12.
Only if the patient gives permission or requests that I do so.
13.
Yes when able. Think families are an important part of the recovery process.
14.
If the patient has given me consent.
15.
If the patient would like me to consult with their families and provide consent for me to do so, I would have no problem with consulting with them. Families can be a source of strentgh for patients so working with them can definitely be a strength.
Question 25 of 30
Have you facilitated any outreach programs? Tell me about it.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I was an organizer in an outreach program to the community.
2.
I have not ran an outreach program on my own, but I have taken part in coming up with ideas for my current outreach program to use to benefit the patient in our program.
3.
Yes, support groups for people with addictions and mental health issues.
4.
Yes, I ran a stress management class and an art journaling class. The patients who attended stated to me that it helped the through some difficult times.
5.
I have not been in that situation, but I think this is something I would like to do.
6.
I havedid outreach in the communities, helping families with resources to help them feel like a productive member of society.
7.
Yes, seeking and recruiting new potential customer.
8.
Yes. I currently run a support group.
9.
I have gone to neighborhoods where the drug rate is high, to offer resources to help live a sober and successful life.
10.
I have not run any outreach programs, however I was part of one while on placement. ASH is a housing-first program for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. We provided clients with case management and met with the clients every week or 2.
11.
I have been a part of an outreach program for troubled youth. We met with them once a week and did activities together. Just being present is an outreach for those who spend a lot of their time without parents present. Helping them to see that they are valued and have a bright potential is important for an outreach, which is what we sought to do.
12.
I've participated in outpatient treatment during my internship in which I was given hands-on training in the following: screening, assessments, treatment planning, composing clinical summaries, individual and group sessions, composed progress reports and conducted educational lectures on recovery and relapse prevention.
13.
Yes, Church affiliated program called ALPHA (Purpose driven)
14.
I have not personally run programs but have trained therapist for evidenced based programs.
15.
I ran an outreach program for co-dependent women. It was a weekly group session where women came together to learn about the difference between healthy and unhealthy relationships.
Question 26 of 30
What type of patient are you not comfortable being around?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
A patient that I feel May be a danger to me or souroundings.
2.
With those who have a very serious mental heath issues and are very aggressive.
3.
One that is uncooperative, disruptive, in cohesive.
4.
I am willing to work with anyone.
5.
Sex offenders, child molesters.
6.
Ones who initiate physical touch when I dont know them or without being asked.
7.
I am comfortable being around almost all people, for the most part.
8.
Physically assault criminals.
9.
Combative and Disruptive.
10.
A patient who posts a threat to the workers and clients.
11.
I am comfortable with all types of populations.
12.
I am not comfortable around patients who put sexual advances on me. Although I maintain professionalism and reiterate to my patient that our relationship is strictly counsellor/client.
13.
I don't believe I will be not comfortable around anyone. That being said, I think it would be a challenge working with people who have abused children.
14.
I find I have high tolerance and make a point to find the strengths in others. As I have not provided clinical services yet, I cannot say specifically what type of patient would make me uncomfortable.
15.
I am comfortable with all patients but those who do not seem concerned with the affects of their addiction.
Question 27 of 30
What types of patients do you have the most difficulty treating?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I find it difficult when I have little to work with, little response or engagement. In these situations I will work exclusively at building rapport. I try to sit with the discomfort and try to recognize that this is perhaps a manifestation of the discomfort this person lives with daily.
2.
I find that patients who do not want to participate in their treatment, a difficult situation sometimes.
3.
I think I would have trouble treating people who perpetrate domestic violence or child abuse, but I would not judge them.
4.
The ones that think they already have all the answers.
5.
Patient who are not serious about treatment.
6.
Patients who have been in treatment several times without making any positive changes, they die as a result of their substance abuse problem.
7.
Clients who undermine their own treatment process by being disruptive towards other clients or rude to staff. This is usually the case with clients who are not committed to treatment and are doing it to please someone else, those are usually the most difficult to work with. I try to support those clients and make their stay comfortable whether they decide to stay further or not.
8.
The ones that do not want to accept the help.
9.
I realize that everybody is different and must be approached in different ways. I do at times find it difficult to deal with a client who challenges. I have experienced this with clients, and it is important to redirect the client that they are the focus of the session, not I.
10.
Aggressive and disrespectful patients.
11.
The ones that do not talk a whole lot. It makes it difficult to truly understand them if they do not give a lot to work with.
12.
The most difficult patients I've treated were sexual offenders.
13.
I haven't treated anyone yet but I think I would have difficulty treating child abusers.
14.
Manipulative patients who harass other patients in the treatment centre.
15.
Young adult male patients.
Question 28 of 30
How would your co-workers describe your attention to detail?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Separating one's self from is imperative. Though these events are tremendously sad, they are also not something we can take personally. Adolescents often live with an air of invisibility; these thoughts can easily lead to overdoses.
2.
It has to be difficult, but I would remind myself of everything I did right rather than everything I did not do.
3.
Sometimes an overdose can be rock bottom for clients and the thing they need to make them realize they have to chose between staying out and face the strong possibility of dying or getting clean and learning to live. In the event the client does not survive the OD you grieve and recognize more than ever that you are dealing with disease none are immune from and share that experience to try and reach others.
4.
Call 911 immediatley, implent CPR it patient has stopped breathing, and if an opitate overdose, administer Narcan immediately if on site.
5.
Allow him or her to talk. Find understanding and be firm.
6.
By working to gather with a plan for a better future.
7.
Being patient and kind, and offering firm support to keep moving forward with recovery.
8.
I would first remove myself emotionally from the situation because If I let it get to me I won't think clearly and will not be able to help the patient properly. I would then remind them of the time they spent sober and try to build on positivity and their strengths.
9.
Understanding, Patience, Perseverance.
10.
As in dying? I guess it would be sad. I would debrief with my coworker and supervisor. Give myself time to mourn and grieve. Mb fall back on my spirituality and art.
11.
When I come to work provide the best services I can. If a young person overdoses, I know I did the best I could.
12.
Realize that they are sick and they are not in their right state of mind. That the drug has control. Never punishing the client for what they have done, just need to start over again.
13.
The same that I do with all patients.
14.
Help them see that they are just beginning life, or have a lot more to live for then what they are able to see at the time.
15.
Being from Chicago and working with children, its saddening for me, simply because they needed help and maybe our services was too late or I may feel something else could have prevented this, but it does happen.
Question 29 of 30
What new therapy approaches have you recently tried?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I find out what clients are good at and present them with opportunities to make their skill a habit.
2.
I have been out of the field for 5 years so I don't know what is out there now that was not available then. In my past work I found anger management to be quite useful.
3.
I work hard at sometimes having to explain why we are doing something we are doing, it does show success as it give the client the opportunity to understand the importance of a task, such as group, educaitonan, etc.
4.
Cognitive behavioral intervention for tics.
5.
I tried collages to work with a patient with obsessive compulsive disorder.
6.
I have tried to engage patients and using their skills to encourage their finishing the programs. For clients who enjoyed writing I asked them to write a story and they would often tell me about the plot and characters, and the patients who enjoyed drawing, I would encourage them to draw something positive in their life or what they would like to see in the future and they often shared it with me.
7.
Silence works well with forcing a client to think about hat ever topic is being fiscussed.
8.
During the planning process, I had clients tell me some goals and while we focused on treatment of the disease, I got them in the habit of talking about their goals, both and long term. This helped in the recovery process because it made the client feel like they were working towards something other than sobriety.
9.
Not forcing a client to have discussions with me. I let the client initiate dialogue. It was successful. End result- Client trusted me more.
10.
Motivational interviewing, I find this very effective with ambivalence, I use a variety of approaches and usually this is tailored to the client.
11.
Behavioural, humanistic Getting to know your clients.
12.
I like motivational interviewing.
13.
I have recently worked with a client who has mental health issues as well as been a polly drug user with a huge addiction to codeine, she wasn't suitable for group and we decided to use person centred therapy in one to one counselling and she is more stable noe.
14.
I have recently tried the Motivational Interviewing approach to get client's engaged, and willing to share information about their history.
15.
I have worked with reality talk and cognitive theraopy, I feel that allowing the clt to also address his/ her own behaviors and also be a part of the solution. reflective listening can also work well with ctls that are able to address current siutations.
Question 30 of 30
What is your current salary?

About Addiction Counselor

April 8th, 2017

As an Addiction Counselor you advise people who suffer from alcoholism, drug addiction, eating disorders, or other behavioral problems. You provide treatment and support to help the client recover from addiction or modify problem behaviors. As an Addiction Counselor you may work within mental health centers, community health centers, prisons, and may even support a private practice. Your day consists of evaluating your clients mental and physical health, addiction, or problem behavior and assess their readiness for treatment. You help your clients develop treatment goals and plans.

Typically a bachelor’s degree is required to be an Addiction Counselor. Depending on the employer, educational requirements can vary from a high school diploma and certification to a master’s degree. To become a licensed Addiction Counselor you'll need to research your state's requirement. Licensing requirements vary by state, but all states require a master’s degree and 2,000 to 4,000 hours of supervised clinical experience. In addition, counselors must pass a state-issued exam and complete continuing education every year. As an Addictions Counselor you work with clients individually and in group sessions so effective communication skills are vital to the job. You display compassion, patience and practice your listening skills daily with your patients.

To prepare for your interview you will want to do your homework on the facility you are interested in working with. Brush up your resume to reflect direct work history you have that will show the interviewer that you will be an asset to their team. Because your line of work as an Addiction Counselor is often stressful be prepared to have the interview team ask you in a few different ways of how you deal with the stress. Have success stories and best practices in your back pocket ready to share if appropriate.

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