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Acting Interview
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25 Questions and Answers by
| Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.

Question 1 of 25

What character was the toughest for you to change into?

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Acting Interview Questions

    1.

  1. What character was the toughest for you to change into?
    • Transforming into a new character can be tough! Physical transformation is one thing, but there are some characters you will play that require skill and technique in order for you to embody them in a convincing way.

      Talk to the interviewer about how you over come the challenge of embodying a very detailed character. Talk about your techniques, talents, and strategies that helped you to get into character.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "So far, the most challenging character I have had to change into was a character much older than myself. I echoed his personality by tapping into some of the mannerisms that I saw in my own grandfather. That technique was very helpful for me."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "Here are some ways that you can get into a difficult character:

      - Perform a lot of research on them and their environment
      - Practice in real life. Try spending a whole day in that character
      - Find a real life source to mimic
      - Make a true connection with the character in any way...big or small"

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    2.

  1. Who is your favorite actor?
    • Will you ever walk the stage of the Academy Awards to accept an Oscar like Marlon Brando? Forget about it! Okay, okay, anything is possible!

      Even as you visualize those actors who have awed wide audiences and won those awards, think about the characters they have embodied. What made them believable? How did they make a significant contribution to the film?

      When you talk about your favorite actor, talk about their characters, films and the lengths they went through to take on those characters. Show your understanding of how a person's individual style can make their characters great.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "My favorite actor, since I was a child, has been Audrey Hepburn. She is classic and embodies the idea of effortless acting."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "I have many favorite actors, in a variety of categories. For comedic actors, I admire Bradley Cooper the most. When it comes to drama, I cannot get enough of Denzel Washington. When it comes to romance, well...Ryan Gosling has it all! I believe the common theme between all of these actors is that, despite their years in Hollywood, they remain level headed in a challenging industry."

    3.

  1. Can you read through a scene from the script for me?
    • The interviewer or casting director would like to be assured of your confidence! By asking this question, they get to see just how prepared you are when the pressure is on. The best way to answer this is to say yes, and offer to jump right into the scene.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "Yes, absolutely! I have memorized Scene 4 in full, because the character monologue really jumped out to me. May I read through this scene for you?"

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "The best way to prepare for an audition is to memorize the lines of the role you intend to play. You can hold the script in front of you, but don't hold it too close to your mouth! Hiding behind your script will make it difficult for you to be heard. If you are on video, they can't see the expressions on your face either.

      Learn as much as you can about the character, the story and how the director intends to portray the piece before you go into your audition. Understand the tone, dialect and style. It can be a bit nerve wracking to read in front of another professional, but take heart!

      The more you audition the more opportunities you have to practice! So, when you are asked to read through the script, be prepared to jump right into character."

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    4.

  1. Tell me about what you're working on now.
    • When you're not busy working on a new role for a production, you are spending your time working towards your goals. If you want to be an actor, you'll need to be willing to put yourself out there. Get creative and be persistent. You'll need to know how to market yourself to gain attention from talent agencies and casting directors. There is always something you can be working on, even if it's just doing research and taking time to brush up on skills you know would help you get the part next time.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "I joined an actors guild to help me network and learn from other actors. Each week we take turns presenting a topic and sharing tips to help each other out. I'm also taking a stand-up class to gain more confidence, help with my writing and comedic timing."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "I recently joined a local theatre troupe and we are currently working on a production of 'Fiddler on the Roof'. It's been incredible so far and I have learned a great deal about musical theatre. "

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    5.

  1. When you suffer a setback, how does that emotionally affect you and your craft?
    • Everyone handles the stress and disappointment of setbacks differently. Discuss with the interviewer how you typically cope with setbacks as an actor.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "Experiencing a setback is always disappointing, and can be a bit disheartening, but I understand that it happens from time to time. If I experience a major setback I will take a few moments to debrief and discuss with the director what I could have done differently. Then, I move on!"

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "Setbacks can be trying, but I find that you have to learn how to lose before you learn how to win. While I never enjoy a setback, I use them as a stepping off point to something even better."

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    6.

  1. Tell me a little about yourself.
    • Don't get caught in the trap of telling them your life story! The interviewer wants to get to know you, but most interested in how it will help you be successful in acting school or in their next production.

      Sharing your training, acting experience and a few hobbies is a great place to start. When talking about hobbies, think about the ones that could be relevant to the job. You'll need to focus, study and research, so talking about how you enjoy reading poetry or how you have played on a successful sports team is valuable information.

      You'll be working with a lot of different personalities, so talking about how much you love people and enjoy going out to concerts or other public places where you get to meet new people shows that you are outgoing and friendly.

      Try to keep this answer brief, but give the interviewer reason to want to know more about you. The way you talk about yourself is also important. Be enthusiastic and composed. Show that you are prepared.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "“I have a B.A. in Communications and Journalism from the University of Michigan. I am also a professional pianist and classically trained vocalist. I’m currently looking for a change into professional acting."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "With pleasure! I have over 10 years in experience in commercial acting and am interested in growing my career to the next level. On a more personal note, I love to read classic novels, go hiking and spend a lot of my extra time volunteering with the humane society."

    7.

  1. Tell me about your education.
    • You have worked hard to get to this point, so take pride in your training as you talk about it! There is no set educational path for an actor. Many study acting in school and continue their education under acting coaches. It doesn't really matter what your education is as long as you can talk about it with confidence.

      Your experience acting in plays and film are a part of your education as well. You may have learned more from a director than you did during acting school. Give examples of your work and talk about how your training has helped get you there.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "I am formally trained in acting through New York Film Academy where I majored in Musical Theater. Since graduating from NYFA, I have worked in small productions around the city while also taking additional coursework in film."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "I recently chose to return to school to gain formal education in Acting and Film. Currently, I am taking some evening classes at our local theater troupe."

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    8.

  1. What sort of acting roles will you be seeking in the future?
    • Now that you know your type and can talk about your style, it will be easier to identify the roles the best fit roles. As you develop a broader range, meaning ability to develop a greater depth within a wider spectrum of characters, you have more options. Practice makes perfect! You may need to challenge yourself by trying something new. Share how what you've done in the past has prepared you.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "Since I have been playing 'the girl next door' quite often, I want to challenge myself by going after more villain or temptress roles. I've been watching Betty Davis films and working with my acting coach to take on this darker style of character."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "I would really like to land my first role in a musical. I think it would be very challenging for me as an actor. I am trained in classical music and voice so I definitely see a potential fit."

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    9.

  1. Do you have any questions for me?
    • Do you remember rolling your eyes when the girl in your English class would ask a question about a character in a book that she would have known the answer to if she had just read the whole chapter? Well, that's kind of how casting directors feel when an actor asks questions that they could have found the answers to on their own.

      'Do you have any questions' is often another way of saying 'Are you ready' Be prepared to get started right away through researching the story, the character, the director and as much information you can gather about the production details.

      Sometimes a director takes a story everyone is familiar with and they put their own spin on it. Knowing that 'Romeo and Juliet' will take place in the 1970's and Juliet will be portrayed as the hippy daughter of a wealthy mobster might make a difference in how you play the role. If these kinds of questions are not answered through your prior investigation, ask! However, be prepared to change the approach you had planned to take in the way you play the character.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "Here are some sample questions:

      - When would you like to have this role filled?
      - How long has this role been vacant?
      - Is this a replacement search?
      - What is your favorite part about being a director?
      - What is your primary goal with this production?
      - Is there anything from my background and experience that I can clarify for you?
      - What do you see as the biggest change in this industry over the past 3 years?
      - Is there any reason why you would not cast me?"

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "Thank you for asking - I do have a few questions. What is top of mind when it comes to filling this role? In addition, what types of characteristics are you looking for in the actor who fills this role? And lastly, I would love to hear more about your personal vision for this project."

    10.

  1. Are you able to work long hours?
    • The filming process can be long and tedious. The same goes for play rehearsals. You will need to be flexible and eager to work whatever hours are expected. Now would be a good time to ask about expectations if you're not sure what the schedule might look like.

      Don't be surprised if there isn't a clear schedule. Decide before the audition what you are able to realistically commit and relay that to the interviewer.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "I am available any day you need me. I have a couple of small commitments I will need to tend to while we are shooting the film, but I am extremely flexible."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "I am 100% committed to this process and will make myself available any hours required for this role."

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    11.

  1. What kind of roles do you prefer?
    • Most actors don't want to be pigeon-holed into a particular role, but you have to start somewhere! It's important to know your strengths and be willing to take on new challenges.
      Having a clear sense of who you are, and what you're good at, is a great start. If you are going to offer examples of preferences for roles you haven't tried, keep them within the range of what you know you can do. This will help casting directors and agents to know what auditions to recommend.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "I would prefer playing the bad boy or the hot shot, but I am also open to trying the contender or the fall guy."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "My experience is limited; however, I have preferred playing roles that are more humorous in nature. I love comedy and find the best fit when I'm playing a character that offers comedic relief."

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    12.

  1. When was your first role as an actor?
    • Perhaps your first role was when you were in a school play at 8 years old. Or, maybe you were cast in a local commercial that you tried out for. For some, acting is in their blood. They have molded themselves into characters since early childhood. You may reflect fondly on your first role or, you may not. Your example merely gives the casting director historical context and insight into you as an actor. How have you grown and improved?

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "My very first acting role was a commercial for a local candy store when I was just 5 years old. I recall memorizing my lines in my bedroom and being really nervous for the big day. I don't even remember if I was paid for the gig! Regardless, it gave me the bug for acting and I haven't looked back since."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "I just started pursuing my acting career which means that my list of experience is short. I recently played a minor role in a community play. Not only was the experience fun, it also taught me a great deal about discipline. I am excited to get the ball rolling on my career as an actor."

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    13.

  1. If you could teach this room any acting technique, which would you choose?
    • The interviewer would like to be assured that you are knowledgeable when it comes to the technicalities associated with acting. Choose one particular method that you feel most confident in and show that you would be able to teach it to the room.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "If I could teach the room any acting technique, I would choose Stanislavski’s System. Every actor should be able to get in touch with their own human emotions by recalling their own personal experiences, drawing on intimate pain, and memory recall."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "I love the idea that I could, one day, teach a room of budding actors! I am newer to this profession so the technique I would currently choose would be a straightforward method such as Practical Aesthetics. This method focus' on script work and developing a very literal understanding of the events in the script or scene."

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    14.

  1. Tell me about a time when you had a really bad day but had to perform that night. How did you get through it?
    • As you take on new characters, you begin to learn that you have everything you need inside you. The characters are embodied through the qualities you give them in your emotions, words and body language. So, if you have a bad day, it's up to you to set it aside! Share with the interviewer how you push past a bad day and continue to perform.

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "As I get into character, I use all of the frustration from the day to energize me and motivate me. I always use the frustration to my benefit."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "If I am having a really bad day, and still need to perform, I talk myself through it. I can shift a bad day into a phenomenal performance, by setting my mind to it! If you have any techniques that you use to help you shift gears and be present on stage, I would love to hear more about them."

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    15.

  1. Describe your acting style.
    • Think about what you need as an actor to be successful. Do you need a lot of direction or can you jump in and quickly pick up on cues? Depending on your training, you may be the type of actor that does extensive research on your role and stays in character after they call "cut."

      Who are your influences? What do you do to prepare? All of these elements factor into your "style." Your style also acknowledges your shortcomings. By defining who you are, you are willing to accept who you are not. You can't be everything to everyone, and you won't be perfect for every part. Think back on your strengths. How do they contribute to the style that makes you unique?

      Rachelle's Answer #1

      "cut."

      Rachelle's Answer #2

      "Here are some ways you can describe your acting style:

      - Intentional
      - Thoughtful
      - Methodical
      - Emotional

      Here are some specific acting techniques that you may follow:

      - Stanislavski
      - Strasberg
      - Stella Adler
      - Meisner
      - Chekhov
      - Practical Aesthetics
      - Uta Hagen
      - Viola Spolin"

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