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Veterinarian School Interview
Questions

52 Questions and Answers by Ryan Brown

Updated August 22nd, 2018
Job Interviews     Careers     Health    
Question 1 of 52
In your opinion should people be allowed to own exotic species? Justify your answer.
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How to Answer
This question has no wrong or right answer, as the interviewer is looking for your personal opinion on the question, and for you to explain your reasoning behind your answer. With this sort of question, you need to fully consider your response, alongside the role you are applying for.
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Answer Examples
1.
In your opinion should people be allowed to own exotic species? Justify your answer.
This question has no wrong or right answer, as the interviewer is looking for your personal opinion on the question, and for you to explain your reasoning behind your answer. With this sort of question, you need to fully consider your response, alongside the role you are applying for.

Ryan's Answer
"In my opinion, no, people should not have exotic pets. Exotic animals belong in the wild. They should not be captured, they should not be constrained. They are wild and beautiful and they should live and thrive in their own habitat. People don't want exotic animals to love and cuddle. They want them to show off their prestige, wealth, and position."
Anonymous Answer
"In my opinion, people should not be allowed to own exotic species. I feel this way because most exotic species are not able to be taken care of properly because of their biological needs. For example, nutritional, proper exercise, or they may need to be with individuals of the same species and environment. These animals would live more of a thriving, healthy, and happy life in the habitat they belong to."
Rachelle's Answer
You support your opinion very well with strong reasoning. Good answer!
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Anonymous Answer
"I feel that unlike common pets, dogs, and cats, exotic animals are not designed to be companion animals. They aren’t meant to live in a human habitat the way dogs and cats can, so they should be allowed to live in the wild. Their natural habitat cant be simulated easily, usually resulting in them residing in small cages."
Rachelle's Answer
Very strong points, indeed. You make a great case for leaving exotic animals in their natural habitats.
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2.
What is your typical way of dealing with conflict? Give me an example.
There are many other variations on this question and it is a very common interview topic. From the interviewer's perspective, the idea is to find out about the candidate's conflict management ability and general interpersonal skills.

Ryan's Answer
"When dealing with conflict, I first listen hard to the other person or people on the other side of the issue to be sure I understand what their argument is, and try to determine their open-mindedness to hear another perspective. I then lay out my case and hear their response. I either sell them on my side, get sold on their point of view, or compromise to make both sides as sanguine as possible to move forward to a mutually agreeable outcome."
Anonymous Answer
"I feel proper communication can diffuse any conflict. I am a trained, advanced peace advocate, so I regularly employ conflict resolution techniques in various situations in my school and social life. This involves listening carefully to understand the issue properly, then giving multiple solutions from which the individual can choose from and attempt. During this time, I show no facial expression to indicate my opinion and do not start talking until the person has finished."
Rachelle's Answer
Wow - this is really cool and stand-out information that any interviewer should be interested in hearing. How did you go about training as a peace advocate? A bit more background may be nice here.
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Anonymous Answer
"I do not see myself as a confrontational person. I have no trouble standing up for what is right; however, I am not one to quickly get involved with conflict. In the case of a dispute, I try to handle the situation with up-front and fair questions. I choose to listen to others and reach an agreement, even if the agreement is choosing to disagree. When I have dealt with conflict in the past, I approach another individual without blame and like to talk out disagreements and try to see eye to eye, if possible."
Rachelle's Answer
It seems your approach is professional and fair. Good answer!
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3.
In your opinion, what do you think would be the most difficult situation you could face as a Vet? Justify your answer.
Interviewers are asking this question to establish your thoughts and views on the difficult situations vets encounter within their role. There is no wrong or right answer to this question, however, it is recommended that you look into, or consider some challenging situations prior to an interview, such as death/loss of an animal, mistreatment etc.

Ryan's Answer
"For me, I think facing a situation that involved animal mistreatment or cruelty would be one of the most difficult things to encounter, purely because of my love and respect towards animals. I will find it difficult to understand how someone could mistreat animals, and am sure these types of situations can be very testing."
Anonymous Answer
"That would be facing the situation of having to put a healthy animal down because the owners cannot afford to look after it but having to respect the decisions of the owners."
Rachelle's Answer
Solid answer! I have reworked the working for you.
"The most difficult situation that I could face as a vet would be having to put a healthy animal for the convenience of the owners. This topic is a controversial one that I find difficult to understand. Unfortunately, animals are considered property so, in my region, I would have to oblige."
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Anonymous Answer
"The most challenging aspect of veterinary medicine would be the inability to treat an animal due to refusal of treatment by the owner. There are many occasions I have seen where a doctor will recommend a treatment the animal needs. Many times owners are not willing or able to spend the necessary funds on treating an animal."
Rachelle's Answer
This is a sad situation, for sure, and one that happens far too often. Do you have a recommendation for this type of situation? If you were the clinic owner, what would you do?
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4.
As a vet, do you have the right not to treat an animal? Explain the reasoning behind your answer.
This question is being asked by the interviewer to establish your knowledge of the veterinary industry. Prior to your interviewer, it is recommended to research fully so that you can confidently answer this question, with evidence to support your response.

Ryan's Answer
"My research has definitely helped me in answering this question. My understanding is that a veterinarian is under no legal duty to treat an injured animal. But once a vet agrees to treat a pet, stopping while the animal still needs attention may lead to malpractice liability"
Anonymous Answer
"A vet is under no obligation to treat an animal. However, if treatment is started and then suddenly stopped it would be extremely unethical to refuse to treat the animal. At that point, you have a duty of care to this animal. For example, if an animal was not a client of yours and belonged to another vet, then you are under no obligation to treat this animal."
Rachelle's Answer
Solid response with a good example at the end.
"A veterinarian is under no obligation to treat an animal. If a vet had started treatment and then stopped, it would be unethical not to complete the treatment as they must care for the animal. However, if an animal was not a client of the vet, and belonged to another vet, they are under no obligation to treat the animal."
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Anonymous Answer
"There are currently no laws requiring vets to provide treatments to all animals. The practicing veterinarian has the control of which animals to take in, but once treatment starts, they are obliged to complete work to the best of their ability. So the control point to not treat animals that do not fit your experience is at the door. If a patient came in that did not fit under your specialty or even outside of office hours, veterinarians have the ability to turn them away, while possibly referring to another vet."
Rachelle's Answer
You show a strong knowledge of a veterinarians' responsibility. Thorough, easy to understand the response.
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5.
What was your motivation for wanting to be a Vet? Have you always had a love of animals?
The interview is asking this question to establish your reasons for wanting to work within veterinary medicine. When answering this question it is important that you explain what influences you have had when making your decision, is it a family profession? have you always wanted to work in this industry?

Ryan's Answer
"I have always wanted to work as a vet, ever since I was a child. I, obviously, have a huge love for animals and wildlife and think that setting my career goal from a young age has kept me focused and aligned to my future employment choices. My father is also a vet and so I think following in his footsteps is a good choice"
Anonymous Answer
"I grew up around animals; my mother always made sure we took in stray cats. My desire to work with animals began with elephants. My heritage in India always seemed to follow me, and I found myself wanting to study these magnificent creatures. I was involved in research in Thailand with elephants, where I met a wildlife veterinarian who inspired me to incorporate my passion for animals with my interest in medicine."
Rachelle's Answer
This is wonderful inspiration, indeed! Nice answer.
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Anonymous Answer
"I always had a love for animals and wanted to work with them even before I knew it was work. As a kid growing up, we always had animals, went to zoos, and watched animal planet. I was also lucky enough to grow up with a veterinarian as a mother. I made every day I could take your kid to work day to get a glimpse at what she was doing. No other career option could ever compare, working with animals and helping them was my calling, and I have spent the last few years making it a reality."
Rachelle's Answer
It is terrific that you are taking on a similar career to your mother; how exciting! You give a nice overview here, bringing your passion for animals to the forefront.
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6.
If you had to choose one area of specialism to work within, what would it be?
Vets may choose to specialize in various areas of veterinary medicine, which can include small animal medicine, small animal surgery, large animal medicine, welfare ethics and law, public health, cardiology, and orthopedics. The interviewer is looking to understand your main interests and aspirations for your veterinary career, and the areas of the industry you find most appealing.

Ryan's Answer
"I would like to specialize in cardiology as I have always had a keen interest in the heart, and advances in medicine/technology and how this can benefit patients. Cardiac specialists are also able to perform operations on the heart that are particularly unusual or complex and can get involved in experimental procedures on pets that would otherwise have no chance of survival. This would be so rewarding and something I would love to explore further in the future"
Anonymous Answer
"I would specialize in large animal medicine as I thoroughly enjoyed volunteering on a range of farms, including beef, sheep, and dairy. I found the disease control methods farmers employ fascinating. I found I was most interested in the large animal aspects of veterinary medicine and enjoyed observing consultations on farms."
Rachelle's Answer
It seems you have great direction so far, which the interviewer should be happy to hear. You make a great case for the fascinating side of large animal medicine.
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Anonymous Answer
"There are so many different areas I would love to work within as a veterinarian. Although, the one that I would choose currently is to work with aquatic life. I have always had a passion and curiosity for these creatures. Working at my internship in Washington state increased my desire to learn and care for these animals. I was able to aid harbor seal pups that were in distress with Dr. Jones. Another reason I would like to choose this area is that it is more difficult to help wild animals because no one is continuously watching their behavior change or determine something is wrong as quickly with pets or agricultural animals."
Rachelle's Answer
Your reasoning is so heartfelt, and you do a fantastic job bringing your passion and desires to life for the interviewer. Good work!
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7.
Why do you feel you are the best candidate for Veterinarian School? What can you bring to the school that makes you an ideal applicant?
This question is one of the most common questions to be asked during an interview process. You MUST be prepared with a concise summary of the top reasons to choose you. Even if your interviewer doesn't ask one of these questions in so many words, you should have an answer prepared and be looking for ways to communicate your top reasons throughout the interview process. With this question, your interviewer is asking you to sell yourself and your status as the best person for the position. In answering this question make sure you explain that: You can do the work and deliver exceptional results You will fit in beautifully and be a great addition to the team You possess a combination of skills and experience that make you stand out from the crowd.

Ryan's Answer
"I have the experience and the attitude to excel in this position. I have almost two years of veterinary experience, which I have gained in collaboration with my school, where I was exposed to all aspects of Veterinary Medicine and worked so hard the first year that they invited me back for a second summer and gave me more responsibilities. I have a reputation for getting things done -- and with a smile on my face. That's because I love working in the Veterinary industry and am excited to learn and get experience in every way possible."
Anonymous Answer
"One of the things that makes me unique is my dedication to serve my community. I grew up in the Appalachian region, resources are limited. I volunteered most of my time to our school backpack program that provides dinner for students whose parents can't afford to feed them at dinner. I also volunteered at my college with the local high school tutoring children. I hope to continue community service projects into vet school."
Rachelle's Answer
Excellent response! Most decision-makers prefer applicants with a background in volunteering, and yours is very strong. You show a lot of heart, which is great. If you have any academic achievements that make you a stand-out candidate, it would be beneficial to add these in.
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Anonymous Answer
"I believe that I am a prime candidate for vet school because of my experience, drive-in academics, and passion for always learning. I want to contribute to research and discoveries throughout my career. Since I graduated from school in May, I have worked a full-time job as a veterinary assistant, and I am continuing to learn new techniques every day. Between my full-time job and experience gained in other hospitals in collaboration with school, I have had prime exposure to the veterinary world. I strive to remain calm, positive, and passionate during my work."
Rachelle's Answer
Your experiences thus far will be a very valuable addition to your application. This is a very well-rounded answer, touching on the soft and hard skills you will bring to the school.
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8.
Give me a specific example of a time when you have used good judgement and logic in solving a problem. What was the process followed, and what was the outcome?
If asked this question the interviewers are looking for more than just your command of the procedures and protocols of the job. They are also evaluating exactly what you consider good judgment to be- and what your priorities and assumptions are when you apply logic to a situation. The goal with these questions is to demonstrate how you are able to manage difficult situations and resolve them. This means that whatever the situation was that led to your use of good judgment or logic- the emphasis should be on your actions and their favorable results.

Ryan's Answer
"I had a client come into the bank where I worked and request a small personal loan to "
Anonymous Answer
"One time an emergency was brought in where a dog had been attacked, and we had a full waiting room of clients with only one vet in at the time. I had to use my good judgment to help the vet treat the injured dog as I knew that was the priority while apologizing to the waiting clients for any inconvenience."
Rachelle's Answer
And I'm sure the clients understood the emergency :) Great example of thinking on your feet.
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Anonymous Answer
"I was taking an advanced virology class in which the teacher was hard to understand, and the tests were extremely difficult. I took the initiative with my study group to form a strategy for finals. We would compare all of our lecture notes, teaching the material to each other. If we had disagreements over the material, we would have a more in-depth discussion about that material, ask the teacher about it, and share additional resources we found outside of class. We also quizzed each other on questions he could potentially ask. We all did well on the finals."
Rachelle's Answer
This is a fantastic approach to studying and collaborating with others. You show strong problem-solving capabilities as well as leadership abilities.
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9.
What experience have you had working within Veterinary Medicine? What have you most enjoyed?
Interviewers often ask this question in order to gain a better insight into your career and work history. This question is asking you to explain your previous experience, if you have any, and then explain what areas you have most enjoyed. Try to focus on skills and specifics here, and think of examples which could be transferable into your new role, as this will show you have an understanding and experience of how your past career can be utilized further.

Ryan's Answer
"I have had experience working within a local veterinary surgery as a weekend assistant. My role was to support the veterinary surgeon during local surgery, assisting with preparation and paperwork prior to and following surgery. The most enjoyable part of this role was having exposure to various surgical procedures, which allowed me to learn processes and ask questions throughout."
Anonymous Answer
"I have shadowed at both a small and mixed animal clinic, which has allowed me to observe a wide range of routine to emergency cases. I have learned about many diseases and treatments from the vets and learned how to take a heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, and breathing rates of patients during surgeries. I most enjoyed watching the surgeries as I found it fascinating to see various organs within an animal."
Rachelle's Answer
It seems that you have a broad and valuable range of experiences, which is wonderful!
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Anonymous Answer
"I have had experience with two separate equine veterinarians. One of the practices focused on breeding, and the other focused on sports medicine. I was able to assist in some surgeries as well, such as castrations and orthopedic surgeries. I was fascinated by the operations, and I tried to learn each procedure and asked questions to get a better understanding. I found myself to be comfortable with the gross aspects of surgery, and that would be a specialty I would consider."
Rachelle's Answer
It seems your experiences have been broad, exciting, and highly targeted to your desires as a veterinarian. Great answer!
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10.
What is your opinion on using live animals to practice surgery?
This question is asking for your opinion, therefore it is recommended that prior to interview you research into laws that surround the use of live animals in schools, so that you have an understanding of the subject nature and outcomes. While there is no wrong or right answer here, considering the use of animals for study no longer happens, it is recommended to answer in favor of this change.

Ryan's Answer
"I disagree with the use of live animals for study programmes and fully support the changes to the academic system to prevent this from happening. I believe that the use of synthetic materials and simulations is a far better method as it allows students to learn at their own pace with the ability to repeat a procedure as often as needed, and this eliminates the need for animals to be used"
Anonymous Answer
"I think that it is a great thing that many vet schools in the US are looking for alternatives for the use of live animals or at least reduction in terminal surgeries. I think it is important to look into other options, such as having students work alongside vets on real surgical cases and other nonanimal models such as virtual simulators. I feel it is possible to reduce animal use in practice surgery, but with current technology, we can't eliminate animal use yet."
Rachelle's Answer
Your answer provides many alternatives that are very do-able, yet you also show reason by including that we aren't 100% there yet. Good balance in your response!
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11.
Is there a specific area you wish to work in as a vet? Do you have any aspirations to work outside of a standard practice?
The interviewer is questioning your future career choices and wishes to know if there is an area of specialism, within the veterinary industry, which appeals to you. This question is often useful for an interviewer to understand your future career aspirations, and will likely assist in guiding you through this process to reach them (should you be successful).

Ryan's Answer
"I have a strong interest in specialising in Equine Health, due to my passion for horses. I believe this to be the career route for me, and I intend to study hard to fulfil this dream. Equine Studies is a tough area to specialise in, however, I feel ready for the challenge"
Anonymous Answer
"There is no one specific area that I wish to work as a vet because, over the years, my interests and curiosities have changed. I feel that as a student in veterinary school, I will learn and discover new passions that may lead to new paths. I do, however, at this current time have aspirations to work outside of standard practice and to be able to work with exotic animals, aquatic species in particular."
Rachelle's Answer
It's entirely alright to have fluid interests! Your interests are exciting, and you sound very open to new experiences.
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Anonymous Answer
"I aspire to work with farm animals since I found the farm and large animal aspects of my work experience the most fascinating. I would also like to travel and work with various breeds of farm animals all over the world. I have always dreamt of working in New Zealand. In the long term, I would like to set up a mixed practice, in a rural area, much like the practice I attend for work experience."
Rachelle's Answer
These are interesting and exciting goals! Your specifics will help the interviewer to picture your goals better.
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12.
Tell me about a time when you had to go above and beyond the call of duty in order to get a job done. What was the reason behind this, and what was the outcome?
If your interviewer asks you to give an example of a time that you felt you went above and beyond the call of duty, they are not necessarily interested in the example itself. Instead, they want to ensure that you are the type of worker that will work hard to get the job done properly, rather than just to get the job done. Additionally, they want to know what your definition of 'going above and beyond' is. Because the interviewer is most interested in ensuring that you have the quality they are looking for, your answer should focus on that quality. In this case, you should focus on dedication and hard work.

Ryan's Answer
"At my last job, I was given a project and the expectations for it, but I knew that the minimum requirements were not going to get the job done properly. I had to work weekends, but I did it how I knew it had to be done. That is how I define 'going above and beyond': doing what needs to be done and not just what is expected of me. "
Anonymous Answer
"When I was working within a group to prepare science-based lessons for primary children, the plans weren’t being made and lessons organized. So I decided to find ideas, plan the number of materials needed, create a rota, and organize group meetings to ensure the lessons would run smoothly. My group wasn’t as enthusiastic or interested as I’d hoped, and did not meet deadlines, so I took matters into my own hands."
Rachelle's Answer
The fact that you took matters into your own hands shows a lot of initiative, confidence, and leadership capabilities. All of these are critically important qualities for a Veterinarian to have as well! This was a good example to use.
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Anonymous Answer
"While working at my first job as a pizza cook/manager, I had to do what would benefit the restaurant. One day one of my coworkers did not show up to work. Since I opened the restaurant at 8 a.m., this individual would have been closing. The coworkers and I finished the dinner service, but since I was the manager, I stayed to close the restaurant because I did not think it was fair to ask them to stay. I worked a 16 hour shift that day to help the restaurant and my staff. My boss was very proud that I took responsibilities as a manager and did not try to get out of it."
Rachelle's Answer
It's very nice that you did what you felt you needed to, on behalf of your employer and staff. Your answer shows a lot of integrity!
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13.
Give an example of a time when you have had to deal with an irate customer or co-worker. How did you handle the situation, and what did you learn from it?
Handling irate customers is not a simple matter. No matter how frustrated or angry you are, you will need to show professionalism when dealing with these customers. For all you know, the customer may be having a bad day or a difficult time in his life. In any case, an interviewer will want to know how you will deal with irate customers. Answering this interview question requires confidence and preparation.

Ryan's Answer
"I would always calmly explain to them, in as simple language as possible, how the issue can be solved. To rectify the problem, I will need to evaluate their concerns and what went wrong. If the issue is beyond my control, I will not hesitate to ask those in authority to help the customer address the problem."
Anonymous Answer
"One time during high school, I was managing a toy store. A customer came in, cussing and angry. She wanted a refund on a toy, but she didn't have her receipt. I was calm and could tell she was frustrated. I told her I couldn't give her a refund, but I could offer her store credit. She ended up crying and leaving the store with a new toy without a thank you. I learned you need to stay professional no matter what, and sometimes people have bad days."
Rachelle's Answer
It's great that you can separate yourself from getting sucked into the emotions of others, and that you remain professional. How do you think this approach will help you in your role as a veterinarian? It would be good to tie this concept in with your answer at the end.
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Anonymous Answer
"There is a client who always seems irritable and angry when he comes into the clinic. He is condescending and rude to everyone, including the doctors and assistants. When I first dealt with him, I was a new worker, and I made the mistake of trying to rationalize with him. I learned that if I listened to him, even if I disagreed with what he was saying, he was much kinder and would allow me to speak without continuing to get angry. I learned that he just wanted to be listened to."
Rachelle's Answer
This person sounds like a challenge, indeed! It's great that you quickly learned how to best communicate with this client.
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14.
Give me an example of a time when you have been required to work closely with your colleagues to keep them motivated. Why was this important, and was it successful?
Employers are typically interested in assessing how well co-workers and clients would respond to you if you were hired, and how you would interact with them. This is a situational interview question, and there is no wrong or right answer. One strategy for your response is to share an anecdote to demonstrate the motivational techniques you have used in the past.

Ryan's Answer
"While at my previous company we had redundancies in the middle of an already understaffed project. The 5-person team I was in was demoralized and also needed to absorb the additional work from the departed staff. I took everyone on the team out for coffee individually. These one-on-one meetings were an opportunity to vent, but also created space for employees to share pain points. I shared all the potential roadblocks in a follow-up team meeting, and we brainstormed solutions together, including adjusting the timeline slightly.
Because the team felt that their frustrations were acknowledged, there was no simmering resentment holding people back. Instead, the team felt enthusiastic and unified in a common goal. "
Anonymous Answer
"As I was the captain of the regional senior team, I had an important job of motivating and encouraging the team during training and competitions. During a game day, our teams' morale was decreasing as we faced tough competition and struggled to play to our best ability. I led by example, giving vocal encouragement and working harder to gain possession of the ball. The team followed suit, and our performance improved. We went on to win the game."
Rachelle's Answer
You sound like a true leader! Using examples from competitive sports is always a great angle to take in a student interview. Nice work!
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Anonymous Answer
"Genetics was a tough class in undergrad. Each exam was very difficult, and I knew that to even perform averagely on the exam, I had to put in many hours of studying. I had a study group for this class, and we studied together before each exam. Before we met up the night before the exam, I would create study plans and practice tests for us to do as a group. I acted as the team leader and kept us on pace as we studied. When we lost momentum, I would lay out achievable goals. It was successful in that I felt prepared for my exams. There was another time where I took new members of my sorority to coffee mid-semester so that we could talk out how their semester was playing out, and I did this to keep them motivated and give advice if needed."
Rachelle's Answer
It seems that you take on a leadership role often, and very naturally so. Excellent examples of working hard, being detailed, and keeping focused to reach your goals. It's awesome that you work so hard to help others along the way!
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15.
What does delegation mean to you?
Delegation is an essential management skill, definitely one of the very most important. The interviewer wants to know if understand the importance of delegation and whether or not it's something you're capable of doing effectively.

Ryan's Answer
"I believe that delegation is an essential management skill. It's a manager's job to delegate and to supervise that delegation; it's not possible - or desirable - to do everything yourself single-handedly. You have to weigh up how long it will take to explain to someone else how to undertake the task by comparison to how long it would take to just do it yourself. Small one-off tasks are typically best done yourself but lengthier tasks - or tasks which are likely to need to be repeated in the future - are often best delegated."
Anonymous Answer
"Delegation is splitting up a large goal into smaller tasks in a way that people are comfortable with the role they have, and the work is split up equally among individuals. Delegation gives freedom to people to learn new roles to advance their knowledge. Also, it means having trust and confidence in other people to perform their functions without micromanaging."
Rachelle's Answer
I like this answer! You show great insight into the fact that delegation also includes allowing others to shine in their strengths and interests.
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Anonymous Answer
"To me, it means knowing your team and their strengths, knowing that one person doesn't have to take on the full responsibility of a task, and the majority of the time, its more useful to have team members assigned their personal duties."
Rachelle's Answer
This is a good explanation of delegation. Nice perspective!
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52 Veterinarian School Interview Questions
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Interview Questions
  1. In your opinion should people be allowed to own exotic species? Justify your answer.
  2. What is your typical way of dealing with conflict? Give me an example.
  3. In your opinion, what do you think would be the most difficult situation you could face as a Vet? Justify your answer.
  4. As a vet, do you have the right not to treat an animal? Explain the reasoning behind your answer.
  5. What was your motivation for wanting to be a Vet? Have you always had a love of animals?
  6. If you had to choose one area of specialism to work within, what would it be?
  7. Why do you feel you are the best candidate for Veterinarian School? What can you bring to the school that makes you an ideal applicant?
  8. Give me a specific example of a time when you have used good judgement and logic in solving a problem. What was the process followed, and what was the outcome?
  9. What experience have you had working within Veterinary Medicine? What have you most enjoyed?
  10. What is your opinion on using live animals to practice surgery?
  11. Is there a specific area you wish to work in as a vet? Do you have any aspirations to work outside of a standard practice?
  12. Tell me about a time when you had to go above and beyond the call of duty in order to get a job done. What was the reason behind this, and what was the outcome?
  13. Give an example of a time when you have had to deal with an irate customer or co-worker. How did you handle the situation, and what did you learn from it?
  14. Give me an example of a time when you have been required to work closely with your colleagues to keep them motivated. Why was this important, and was it successful?
  15. What does delegation mean to you?
  16. Veterinary school can be an intensive, stressful experience at times. Can you tell me about a time where you have had to handle a pressurised situation? What happened and what was the outcome?
  17. Studying at Veterinarian School will require dedication and commitment to your workload. How will you ensure you remain motivated to your studies?
  18. How has your education to date influenced your decision to train as a Veterinarian?
  19. Imagine the situation. You are working within your role and have a female who gave birth to 9 puppies. She can't feed them all. What would you do? How would you distinguish those that are undernourished?
  20. Give me a specific example of a time when you have had to conform to a policy with which you did not agree. What happened and what was the outcome?
  21. Tell me about a time when a colleague you have been working with has made a mistake. What happened, and what steps did you take to rectify it?
  22. Give an example of a time when you have failed to reach a target or achievement. How did you handle this, and move forward?
  23. What are your opinions on the use of animals for Veterinary School? Do you think your opinions will change if you are accepted to the study programme?
  24. What do you think are the best parts about working for a private practice? And why?
  25. Why do you think it is important to be able to use your initiative within the role of Veterinarian?
  26. Put yourself in the position of a qualified Vet. What would you do if you felt the animal you were treating may have been abused? What legal avenues would you pursue, if any?
  27. Put yourself in the position of a qualified vet. What would you do if an animal was brought into the surgery, having been hit by a car, and the owner refuses to pay for treatment? Would you still treat the animal?
  28. What are your long-term career aspirations? Where do you see yourself in 15 years?
  29. Why do you think a career in Veterinary Medicine is for you? Do you have any other career aspirations if you are not accepted into Veterinary School?
  30. How would you handle the situation if you saw one of your classmates cheating during the course? What would you say, and who would you address it to?
  31. How will you ensure you are financially stable to complete your studies at Veterinary School?
  32. How would you handle a customer who had conflicting opinions and views on the required treatment of an animal?
  33. What experience have you had, if any, working within a farm environment? What did you learn from this experience?
  34. Tell me about a difficult situation you have had to face within your career to date. How did you handle it and what was the outcome?
  35. Tell me about a time when you have had to use your persuasion skills to influence someone's opinion. Why was this needed, and what was the outcome?
  36. Being a Vet will require you to think on your feet and fact-find information if needed. How will you ensure you remain abreast of relevant information required to perform your role?
  37. What is your favourite animal, and why?
  38. Tell me about a time when you have had to use empathy to help a colleague or client through a difficult situation? Why was this important, and how did you manage the situation?
  39. What ethical dilemmas do you think you may face as a veterinarian? How would you handle these?
  40. In your opinion, what do you think is the biggest challenge the veterinary industry faces currently, and why do you think this is?
  41. What traits do you possess that make you qualified to be admitted into Veterinary School?
  42. What skills and behaviours do you feel are important in order to be a successful Vet?
  43. You will be required to provide knowledgeable answers and advice to your clients within the role of Veterinarian. How do you anticipate enhancing your knowledge and skills once qualified?
  44. What do you think are the worst parts about working for a private practice? And why?
  45. In your opinion what do you see as the least appealing part of a career within Veterinary Medicine?
  46. If I had to ask your previous employer to describe your work ethic to me, what do you think they would say, and why?
  47. Give me an example of a time when you have missed an obvious solution to a problem. How were you made aware of it, and how did you rectify it? What did you learn from this situation?
  48. In your opinion, what do you see as the most appealing part of a role in Veterinary Medicine?
  49. Looking back at your previous education, which class did you find most challenging, and why?
  50. How do Animal Rights and Animal Welfare differ?
  51. Talk me through the research you have done prior to applying for this course. How do you know this course is right for you?
  52. Talk me through any clinical experiences you have had, if any. What exactly you did, and what you learnt from it.
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