MockQuestions MockQuestions
Interviews Questions by Career
Interviews Questions by Company
Interviews Questions by Topic
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Speech Pathology Interview
Questions

28 Questions and Answers by Ryan Brunner

Updated August 17th, 2018 | Ryan has over 10 years of experience interviewing
candidates in the healthcare, public service, and private manufacturing/distribution industries.
Question 1 of 28
Can you have a patient that has an aphasia and apraxia, and if so, which one would you address first? And how?
Click to View Answers
How to Answer
Yes, you can have a patient with both! As a Speech Pathologist, you know that Aphasia and Apraxia are two major neuropsychological syndromes that, in most cases, are caused by injuries in the left cerebral hemisphere. Patients with aphasia experience difficulty in expressing nonverbal ideas and thoughts as words and grammatically correct sentences. Apraxia is characterized by loss of the ability to carry out learned purposeful movements despite having the physical ability to do so. Tell the interviewer your experience working with both types of patients and the treatment that you provided.
1000s of Interview Questions
Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.
1.
Can you have a patient that has an aphasia and apraxia, and if so, which one would you address first? And how?
Yes, you can have a patient with both! As a Speech Pathologist, you know that Aphasia and Apraxia are two major neuropsychological syndromes that, in most cases, are caused by injuries in the left cerebral hemisphere. Patients with aphasia experience difficulty in expressing nonverbal ideas and thoughts as words and grammatically correct sentences. Apraxia is characterized by loss of the ability to carry out learned purposeful movements despite having the physical ability to do so. Tell the interviewer your experience working with both types of patients and the treatment that you provided.

Ryan's Answer #1
"As a Therapist, I would address Aphasia first. Aphasia, being the inability to understand grammatical sentences and reading or writing words or sentences, working on this would at the same time work on the patients Apraxia. While working on understanding sentences, we would be able to focus on the desired speech sound of each word."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my internship, I was fortunate enough to get to work with a stroke patient that was experiencing both aphasia and apraxia. My lead therapist utilized new research to conduct a combined treatment for both conditions and it worked wonderfully with the patient. The CAAST treatment was new to my lead and watching her handle a new therapy method was invaluable to my training."
2.
Describe to me your best therapy session?
The interview wants to hear that you enjoy your job. Now is the time to get excited about sharing your passion! What is your favorite memory from a therapy session? This will make a great answer for this question. Briefly, give an overview of the session, and explain why the session was so great!

Ryan's Answer #1
"I had the opportunity to be involved with a patient in the hospital who had become increasingly frustrated every day at their lack of progression, although they clearly were trying. This was a frustrating point for the SLP, myself, as well as the patient. I watched the patience and empathy of the SLP in his care and time that he took with the patient, and watched the patient relax with this care and considerable time spent with him. It did take some time, but over days and then weeks, we all saw immeasurable progression in his speech and this made all of the time spent worth it."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my work experience in my Master's degree program, I was fortunate to be able to work in an elementary school setting. While there, I worked with a young girl that was struggling with her speech skills and these struggles were creating a lot of stress for her in the classroom. In one brief meeting with her, I could tell she was a bright student. I explained to her, in terms she would understand, the steps we would take to work on her speech and she began crying tears of joy and hugged me. Her seeing a light at the end of the tunnel for her struggles with her speech really made my day and our sessions from there on our went wonderfully!"
3.
Talk to me about the controversies surrounding non-speech oral exercises?
As a Speech Pathologist, you may choose to perform non-speech and speech oral exercises to treat your patients. Blowing, tongue push-ups, pucker-smile, tongue wags, big smile, tongue-to-nose-to-chin, cheek puffing, blowing kisses, and tongue curling are a few non-speech oral exercises. Tell the interviewer your preference and a success story.

Ryan's Answer #1
"I feel that this has become less of a controversy over the past few years, and feel that doing non-speech oral exercises have shown to be an effective means of treatment with obvious benefits to the patient or student."
Ryan's Answer #2
"In my training program for my Master's degree, my faculty were firm believers in these types of exercises and I was able to witness their effectiveness first-hand with students. Making sounds requires movements and people that are struggling with their speech often need practice and exercise with these movements. Similar to a football player stretching their legs before practice or a game, the non-speech exercise help patients when it comes to their speech therapy."
4.
What are your experiences using oral motor approach to improve speech clarity?
As a Speech Pathologist you may use oral-motor therapy to develop awareness, strength, coordination and mobility of the oral muscles. Tell the interviewer that you use this therapy when working with patients that you are treating with feeding therapy. Tell the interviewer that it helps you determine why a child is having difficulty in a particular area and helps you create an oral-motor-feeding plan individualized for the child.

Ryan's Answer #1
"A case in which I would use oral-motor therapy to help speech clarity is when saliva is collecting in the mouth and causing slushy-speech. However, it may not be a speech disorder. If I determine that the root cause of this is a swallowing disorder I will consult with a pediatrician to form a disciplinary team."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my schooling, I was fortunate to be able to learn and work with strengthening exercises for all of the sounds in human speech. Whether it would be using horn blowing exercise to work on lip movement or using the Cheerio trick to work the tongue, these exercises can be effective when working with children on their speech clarity."
5.
Describe the special education referral process.
As a Speech Pathologist, you may provide services in a school, private practice or a large medical facility. If you have experience providing services to children on an IEP, explain the process and role you hold within the school system. If you haven't had the opportunity to provide services to children, that is OK! Explain your current role, how you easily adapt to your surroundings and working within a school would be an easy transition.

Ryan's Answer #1
"I haven't had the opportunity to work within the school system yet but this has been an area of interest for me. I look forward to learning more about my role in the school system and providing care to children needing my services."
Ryan's Answer #2
"During my work experience as part of my Master's program, I was fortunate enough to work in a local elementary where I was exposed to a few IEP planning processes. Working with my supervising Speech Pathologist, I was able to be an integral part of the team of educators that created the plan for each student and put it into action. I learned that the SLP needs to give vital information about the student to be able to put a full IEP into place and then work off of that plan moving forward."
View All 28 Speech Pathology Questions and Answers
Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Q&As,
plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
More Interview Q&As
Explore expert tips and resources to be more confident in your next interview.
Behavioral
Common
Phone
Tough
Leadership
All Interview Topics
All Career Q&As
About Our Interview Q&As
Our interview questions and answers are created by experienced recruiters and interviewers. These questions and answers do not represent any organization, school, or company on our site. We do not claim they will be asked in any interview you may have. Our goal is to create interview questions and answers that will best prepare you for your interview, and that means we do not want you to memorize our answers. You must create your own answers, and be prepared for any interview question in any interview.