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Top 30 Speech Pathology Interview Questions

Question 1 of 30
Can you have a patient that has an aphasia and apraxia, and if so, which one would you address first? And how?
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Question 2 of 30
Describe to me your best therapy session?
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"I had the opportunity to be involved with a patient in the hospital who had become increasingly frustrated every day at their lack of progression, although they clearly were trying. This was a frustrating point for the SLP, myself, as well as the patient. I watched the patience and empathy of the SLP in his care and time that he took with the patient, and watched the patient relax with this care and considerable time spent with him. It did take some time, but over days and then weeks, we all saw immeasurable progression in his speech and this made all of the time spent worth it."
The interview wants to hear that you enjoy your job. Now is the time to get excited about sharing your passion! What is your favorite memory from a therapy session? This will make a great answer for this question. Briefly, give an overview of the session, and explain why the session was so great!
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Question 3 of 30
What excites you the most about speech therapy?
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"The ability to make a difference in the lives of others by providing them with ability and improvement in speech is what excites me most about being a Speech Pathologist."
Why did you decide to pursue speech therapy? Was there a specific instance that resulted in your decision to become a speech therapist? Whatever your unique story, share it with passion. Maybe you went to speech therapy as a child, and it impacted your life so greatly that you wanted to impact other children's lives with the same gift. Be passionate, honest, and candid about your story; it is what interviewers are hoping to hear.
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Question 4 of 30
Talk to me about the controversies surrounding non-speech oral exercises?
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"I feel that this has become less of a controversy over the past few years, and feel that doing non-speech oral exercises have shown to be an effective means of treatment with obvious benefits to the patient or student."
As a Speech Pathologist, you may choose to perform non-speech and speech oral exercises to treat your patients. Blowing, tongue push-ups, pucker-smile, tongue wags, big smile, tongue-to-nose-to-chin, cheek puffing, blowing kisses, and tongue curling are a few non-speech oral exercises. Tell the interviewer your preference and a success story.
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Question 5 of 30
What are your experiences using oral motor approach to improve speech clarity?
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"A case in which I would use oral-motor therapy to “help” speech clarity is when saliva is collecting in the mouth and causing slushy-speech. However, it may not be a speech disorder. If I determine that the root cause of this is a swallowing disorder I will consult with a pediatrician to form a disciplinary team."
As a Speech Pathologist you may use oral-motor therapy to develop awareness, strength, coordination and mobility of the oral muscles. Tell the interviewer that you use this therapy when working with patients that you are treating with feeding therapy. Tell the interviewer that it helps you determine why a child is having difficulty in a particular area and helps you create an oral-motor-feeding plan individualized for the child.
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Question 6 of 30
Describe the special education referral process.
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Question 7 of 30
Why did you decide to become a Speech and Language Pathologist?
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Question 8 of 30
What are your salary expectations?
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Question 9 of 30
Would your friends or family, say you have a good patience?
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Question 10 of 30
Do you prefer working with children or adults?
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Question 11 of 30
Describe your clinical experience during your internship or residency programs.
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Question 12 of 30
Why are you the best candidate for us?
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Question 13 of 30
What experience do you have working with language disorders?
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Question 14 of 30
What are your thoughts about inclusion and pull outs as therapy models?
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Question 15 of 30
Describe how you currently work or communicate with caregivers?
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Question 16 of 30
What speech therapy method do you practice the most?
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Question 17 of 30
What are your research interests?
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Question 18 of 30
What excercise do you encourage the most for NS-OME?
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Question 19 of 30
What are your experiences working with articulation?
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Question 20 of 30
What kind of help do you need to do your best work?
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Question 21 of 30
What are your experiences working with cognitive disabilities?
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Question 22 of 30
How would your current supervisor describe you?
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Question 23 of 30
Speech therapy can cost your patient a lot of money, do you worry about the cost for the patient when doing your job?
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Question 24 of 30
Are you okay working the same career for 15 years?
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Question 25 of 30
Do you like to work in teams or are you an individual achiever?
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Question 26 of 30
What is your greatest strength?
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Question 27 of 30
What is your greatest weakness?
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Question 28 of 30
What do you know about our clinic?
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Question 29 of 30
How would your co-workers describe you?
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Question 30 of 30
Tell us about yourself.
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User-Submitted Interview Answers

Question 1 of 30
Can you have a patient that has an aphasia and apraxia, and if so, which one would you address first? And how?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I would address the aphasia first as it might assist in the ability to work effectively in therapy.
2.
Yes. You can have a child patient that has aphasia and apraxia. Which one you address first depends on the child and the degree of the aphasia and apraxia. I think deal with apraxia first??
3.
Yes, you can have a patient that has both communication disorders. I would work first on the skills that would improve the functional communication of this patient.
4.
Of course I can, but I do not understand the question, patient is patient you should be careful to everyone individually.
5.
Yes, aphasia and apraxia can coexist. I would address aphasia first because the intent of the message is more important than the manner in which it is produced. I would address aphasia by working on language techniques (i. E. Answering questions, describing pictures, etc) and then start working on apraxia techniques (i. E. Targeting speech sounds).
6.
Yes, It depends of the severity of each. I would address the aphasia first. Working on their abiltiyy to respond to simple yes no questions and respond in single words or use of pictures. Once they are able to respond to simple questions accuratley I would then address the apraxia and aphasia. The apraxia may impede progress with the apasia.
7.
Anything is possible, I would work with the aphasia first to help with understand, auditor processing, language buildup. Apraxia is a sensoryneural issue which needs understanding of movements.
8.
I would address the aphasia first because most persons that acquire aphasia had previously had expressive and receptive language. It is more challenging to a person to go from having a language to communicate wants and needs to being now limited. I would approach the aphasia with a communication base approach. Whether it being offering counseling to family members or providing an AAC device that will allow communication easier.
9.
Yes. You can have patient that displays both communication disorders. I would address the aphasia first as it might assist in the ability to work effectively in therapy.
10.
I believe you can have a patient with both. I wouldn't try to address one at a time, rather, both at the same time. It would greatly benefit the patient to perform exercises that strengthen the oral motor mechanism as well as helping him/her with memory.
11.
I think you can have a patient with both. I think both should be addressed at the same time, not one and then another. By working on both at the same time, it helps the client feel more successful in the therapy session. It can help the client better his/her muscle strength in order to produce sounds more successfully, as well as possibly improving memory and word finding in the process.
12.
It is possible for a patient to be diagnosed with both aphasia and apraxia of speech and to be on a speech therapist's caseload. I also believe that it would be quite difficult to determine which diagnosis is impeding the patient's communication the most. I think that it would probably be very beneficial for the patient to have some type of a mixed therapy for both diagnoses seeing that typically insurance doesn't allow for long weeks of therapy. If that were not working I would focus on the aphasia diagnosis, if improvement was not seen within a few sessions I would go back, re-evaluate the situation, and then switch to a higher focus on the apraxia of speech diagnosis.
13.
Yes. The aphasia should be addressed first, as that affects other aspects other than speech, such as cognition. I would first address their cognitive difficulties by working on their memory, executive functioning skills, etc. Then I would begin to address the speech aspects. The therapy approach would depend on the type of aphasia of course. Since each aphasia type has different deficits, I would specifically treat those that were affected in that specific individual. It's also important with aphasic patients to ensure that they are understanding speech and language. If not, treating their speech and language output can be extremely difficult. Once their cognition and receptive language deficits are addressed, I would then go on to work with the apraxia. Again, it varies from patient to patient exactly how this would be addressed. PROMPT is just one example of how the apraxia could be treated.
14.
I believe that they could both happen. You never know. I think that aphasia should be addressed first because that deals with comprehending or using words. Where apraxia is having problems producing the speech sounds. I think that you need to know what you want to say or read before you can produce it so that's why I think aphasia would be important to focus on first.
15.
Yes you can have a patient with both aphasia and apraxia. If this was my client I would treat apraxia first by using pictures and lists of words representing specific sounds and position. In my opinion, the patient would have a feeling of accomplishment when spontaneously saying something even if they cannot comprehend the meaning yet.
Question 2 of 30
Describe to me your best therapy session?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
When the client is engaged and motivated and is showing progress.
2.
I enjoy seeing the progress that students/patient make in improving their communication.
3.
While doing an internship I was treating a man with aphasia, he had a girlfriend and wanted to be able to send her appropriate text messages because he had word finding difficulties, we began practicing with messages and appropriate phrases and after a few sessions he and I shared a conversations through text.
4.
When I participated in an intensive aphasia program and the client was very low level with her communication. She would get very frustrated with herself and upset when she was unable to respond correctly or express herself. One session, I gave her a pep talk and encouragement and she even came in with a better attitude and we had the best session we had throughout the program. She made so much progress and you could just see the excitement and happiness she possessed due to the success.
5.
Where the child is happy, engaged, and is making progress on his goals.
6.
Atime when a student came in and was unable to complete task bit at end of session he understood it completly and accyately and was able to explain it to others.
7.
I was working with a child diagnosed with aspergers. He had great difficulty communicating socially. He also had difficulty intiating conversation. Up until that point we had been working on greetings and pronouns 'you' 'me' and 'I' That day of the session I was shocked and thrilled, as he saw me he said 'hello Mikaela, waving eagerly. This was a home visit, so when he saw his little sister he greeted her too using her name and the waving gesture. This was a huge deal and felt very rewarding seeing this progress. Then during the lesson, he started to grasp when to use the pronouns mentioned. Instead of talking about himself as first person e. G Gary is going to play, he would say "I am...." And "you are"
8.
My best therapy session was when I helped to create a communication passport for a client with severe aphasia that helped the patient make the right choices at meal times.
9.
- identifying the goal was inappropriate - discussed with mother this - needed to work on joint attention before we moved on to word production.
10.
My best therapy session is one where the student is activitely participating in the activity.
Question 3 of 30
What excites you the most about speech therapy?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Seeing people improve their ability to speak and comprehend. Seeing advancements within someone is extremely exciting, knowing that they made changes based on their own efforts.
2.
What excites me most about speech therapy is that it's always something new! Yes, you may have 3 children all working on the sound /r/, but each one has a different personality, different ways of producing it, and therefore need different therapy techniques!
3.
Seeing the smallest gain can be thrilling. Seeing kids grow and make progress is wonderful to experience. Also, no two speech sessions are the same.
4.
The ability to interact closely with another person to help them achieve their maximum potential.
5.
That it is always changing and always challenging. No two clients or clients situations are alike, therefore everyday is different. I am always learning new things and finding better ways to do something or explain something. And it's just so rewarding. The smallest gain in someone's communication or swallowing can mean so much to them. To be able to help people achieve quality of life is an amazing feeling.
6.
Seeing my patients improve their relationships and quality of life.
7.
The ever changing nature of the field. Having a patient/client become a more successful communicator.
8.
Being able to help a child and see them make progress, which will have a positive influence on the rest of their lives.
9.
Making a truly positive impact on someones quality of life.
10.
Working with many different individuals who struggle to communicate, where it be with speech or language. It excites me that I will be one of the professionals that will be able to help these individuals, not only communicate better but feel more comfortable with themselves.
11.
Being able to make a difference in childrens lives and helping to improve quality of life.
12.
Working with kids in a school district and seeing there IEP goals an objectives accomplished.
13.
What excites me most about speech therapy would be watching the progress the child makes over a period of time and knowing that I was along side the child, helping them make progressive steps to better speech.
14.
There is so much that excites me about speech therapy. When I used to think about therapy I thought of it as just a way to help kids who stuttered in school. Now I understand that speech therapy can improve patients quality of life significantly. Dysphagia therapy allows a person to either recover their ability, or hold on to the ability safely swallow for as long as possible and I think that is incredibly important. I am a foodie myself and I understand the pleasure that comes from enjoying your favorite foods and drinks.
15.
I love seeing children make progress and when they are able to make connections. It is also exciting when a child will come into speech the next day with a real life experience of how they used their speech and/or language skills at home or at school.
Question 4 of 30
Talk to me about the controversies surrounding non-speech oral exercises?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Currently there is a lack of evidence base surrounding the use of oromotor excercises to aid speech production, though there is evidence to support their use in chewing therapy and anecdotally some slts feel oromotor activities have resulted in improvements in speech intelligibility.
2.
I am not familar with this so I can not speak to it.
3.
- There is no concrete scientific evidence to suggest that non-speech oral exercises provide any benefit to patients/clients with speech difficulties. - Whilst the patient/client may be able to achieve the non-speech oral exercise, they may be unable to transfer and generalise this skill to a speech sound. - Others believe that for a client who finds speech exercises too difficult, non-speech oral exercises are an appropriate beginning exercise.
4.
The evidence says that if you are doing OM exercises to improve bolus formation or swallow that the movement really needs to mimic the movment you would need them to do for example if you need them to be able to perform a lingual sweep then you would work on ROM and coordination. The exercises need to be intense to show any functional carryover. The jury still seems to be out though.
5.
EBP does not support it. It is not speech based, it is muscular based and many studies show there is minimal muscle strength needed for speech.
6.
Current research states that oral motor exercises are not effective for treatment.
7.
Some specialist say that articulation exercises is nor effective, but I use them in my practice and have very high results with make me happy.
8.
I know there are a lot of controversy regarding oral exercises for swallowing therapy, however, there is a lot of research to support certain exercises for specific areas of dysphagia.
9.
From what I understand, there are two schools of thought regarding this subject. Some speciliasts believe that the non speech oral program help in strengthening the muscles involved in articulation and therefore improve the speech ability. While there are others who believe the actual application of oro motor exercises is in improving swallowing and increasing the oro motor awareness of the patient.
10.
It will dicrese drooling and improve muscle strength.
11.
It is now believed that basic oral exercises unrelated to speech movement are of no benefit to the patient. It is feld that the movements must directly be used with speech in order to benefit and provide carry over for speech improvment or intelligibility.
12.
It is felt that using non-speech oral exercises do not replicate real experiences and that using real speech is a more sensible approach.
13.
I read an article about it but I believe that in some cases, oral- motor exercise is not effective.
14.
Oral motor exercises can be effective if practiced regularly. It should not take up a bulk of therapy sessions as it can be seen as "wasting time" to teach a skill that will not show improvement. It is a good way for parents to get involved at home and provide carryover.
15.
As stated before I know that overall the research cannot necessarily prove that they improve speech sounds, but they do not do any harm.
Question 5 of 30
What are your experiences using oral motor approach to improve speech clarity?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Oral motor exercsies are useful in inproving the strength and rangae of motion of intra oral structures for both swallowing and speech fumctions in patients post stroke, specifically those who are diagnosed with dysarthria and apraxia. Also I found them hepful in head and neck nancer patients. Clinical based literature revealed therapeutic value of using such excercsies in increasing speech intelligibility.
2.
Mixed success using this method. I find it can be really useful for patients in increasing overall awareness of their oral structures and articulatory positions during speech in those who are dyspraxic or dysarthric. This can increase speech intelligibility. I have found that functional speech tasks have proven more successful in speech intelligibility gains, also patients often prefer functional 'relevant' exercises.
3.
People who have dysarthria require exercises in placment and velocity to improve speech. Working on strength would not help improve speech. I have worked on this w/ people before and I will have them work on the phonemes in syllables and words to make the movement more functional.
4.
I have experience using oral motor exercises to improve speech intelligibility. My results have been mixed. In some clients it made no difference in their intelligibility. In others, it worked.
5.
I have experienced mixed results. For some clients it provides awareness of their articulators and their positioning during speech. Some clients however find this approach uncomfortable.
6.
I use a variety of oral motor exercises as well as tools such as whistles to increase strength in the oral motor muscles.
7.
There is lots of debates around whether this actually works, no evidence.
8.
I have used oral motor exercises for stregthen and agility of the oral motor structures for clients with apraxia and dysarthria.
9.
I have had mixed results. Some success with vibration but I found speech oriented therapy to be more useful.
10.
I have not used the oral motor approach on purpose because evidence based practice is not solid that it works.
11.
I believe it depends on the child. A student with significant apraxia may benefit from some oral-motor planning exercises (e. G., blowing bubbles to improve lip rounding). A student with low tone may benefit from strengthening, etc. However I would not put all my hens in that one basket, so to speak. There is limited evidenced based research supporting the use of oral motor exercise to improve articulation/intelligibility. Therefore, I may use some of these techniques as a part of therapy, but they would not be the only intervention approach I would use. I would also use more traditional articulation therapy focused on articulatory placement, training, and generalization using a hierarchy.
12.
I have experience with children who have mental retardation, and with them you should be able to get contact and be very patience, I do my work through playing with them and of course with clear speech.
13.
I think the oral motor approach helps to improve speech clarity when combined with breathing exercises, posture, and pacing techniques.
14.
I have used bite blocks, chews, suckers and oral motor exercises (i. E. Lip puckering, lateralization of the tongue, etc) to increase jaw strength, lip closure, to decrease drooling, to increase tongue strength and awareness in order to improve speech clarity and to increase awareness of the oral mechanisms for sound production. I am aware there is controversy when using oral motor approaches in therapy because there is not a lot of proven efficacy. Sometimes, I think it is necessary especially when working with the younger population when they are unaware of their mouths.
15.
Though I have a good experience developing and implementing oro motor programs for some of my patients, I donot believe they impact the speech ability as much as they improve the general oro motor awarness and positioning.
Question 6 of 30
Describe the special education referral process.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Child is referred. Speech assesses.
2.
The special ed referral process entails observing, testing, and trial and error of workable techniques.
3.
Depends on the workplace's policies and procedures regarding special education referrals.
4.
It depends on the schoold current policies and procedures that they currently have in place.
5.
I think it depends on the schools policies and procedures, but I think the child is evaluated and then referred for a speech evaluation if necessary.
6.
A child is referred, Then we access their speech and language.
7.
Depends on the state qualifications and eligibility requirements. Typically a student is referred for evaluation, and the SLP assesses speech/language and/or articulation as needed.
8.
It depends on the schools policy for referral, but typically the patient is referred from classroom teacher for speech services, and then the SLP evaluates.
9.
A member of the school team, which may be a teacher, parent, guardian, etc. Note that this child may be falling behind or struggling to keep up which leads to a referral to the IEP team.
10.
First the child is identified as needing special education, next he/she is evaluated, then eligibility is discussed. Finally, if the child is eligible, they have an IEP meeting with the parents and follow the program until the next evaluation is held again to measure their progress.
11.
The special education referral process will depend on the policy and procedures of the centre.
12.
It depends on what school you are at and what their procedures are. There is the tier system where the teacher/classroom makes modifications to see if that works. After the student is referred, he will be assessed.
13.
Special Ed referral process starts with an interested party realizing there is a possibility of disability. 2. A team meets and looks at scheduling an assessment. Ax is given, if child qualifies a team meets to make this decision an then they are qualified with a specific type of of disability. An IEP is then written and given to parents to accept and sign.
14.
The special education referral process typically depends on the workplace policies and procedures.
15.
Teacher has concerns about a student. Seeks out help of therapist to disuss alternative strategies, student is entered in tier twi instruction and if no progress is nade student enters tier three and is put in the eip process. If all interventions fail a team meeting is held and often a ppt meeting is scheduled to invite parents to address concerns and sogn for consent for testing.
Question 7 of 30
Why did you decide to become a Speech and Language Pathologist?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I was exposed to it as my brother was thought to have apraxia of speech, he was virtually non-verbal until 4yrs. Through speech pathology my brother came to communicate which reduced his frustration. Also, my two passions in life are communication (relationships) and eating! If I can help someone do either of these two things I feel that helps achieve quality of life, and makes all the hard work worth it.
2.
My younger cousin was diagnose with autism at a young age. I been came more interested in the field and I enjoy helping other overcome obstacles and reach their highest potential.
3.
Because I wanted to make a difference in the lives of the children and adults with whom I have worked.
4.
I became a Speech and Language Pathologist so that through my lifetime of working to provide for myself and my family, I may also help others. I was blessed with a natural disposition to work harmoniously with others, as well as, empathetic to people with disabilities. As a teenager I was drawn to babysitting because I loved being around young children. It was rewarding to create a safe and fun environment for them. As a college student I realized I had a passion for health and learning about the human brain and body. My Dad had been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis when I was a child which definitely played a role in my choice to become an SLP. The combination of wanting to work with children, help others who were sick or disabled, natural tendency to love socializing and communicating with those around me, made the decision of which profession to pursue easy. I have never regretted my choice.
5.
Frankly speaking 15 years ago when I was high school student, my mother injured in accident, after that she went to speech therapy clinic, so I decide to become speech therapist to help patient with any speech and language disorders.
6.
When growing up I thought I wanted to be a teacher so I volunteered in a classroom my senior year of high school. When I went to my community college I took 2 years of ASL and that really interested me. I also was a nanny for a boy that had speech disorder and throughout the time I nannied for him I was able to notice how much more confident he was in speaking. I knew that I wanted to work with children and I decided after that speech therapy was something I was interested in as communication is such an important aspect in life. I want to be able to help those who are less fortunate in that area and be able to be confident with themselves and it seems so rewarding.
7.
My nephew has cerebral palsy and my father inlaw had a stroke. They both inspired me to want to learn more.
8.
I originally started out wanting to be a teacher, then I took a couple of ASL classes and a deaf culture class, and I became interested in speech. I like the idea of helping people and being a positive influence on their lives.
9.
My decision to pursue a career in speech language pathology was influenced by intriguing and complex phenomena involved in speech and language production. My ability to speak two languages made me think more deeply about issues concerning bilingualism, language acquisition, and communication disorders.
10.
Her cousin is autistic, and had a traumatic experience. She was encouraged to go in to the profession.
11.
I have a passion for helping others.
12.
First of all I like this profession and its a new field in applied health profession fand I want to learn something new and serve my nation enthusiatically.
13.
I babysat a young girl who was a selective mute and after working with her for about a year, and became very interested in speech pathology. Her father assisted me with finding a school that was best for me.
14.
I really enjoyed working with children, however I wanted to combine that with something more medically based. I learnt about SLP through a psych course and when I began volunteering I loved working one on one with clients so I knew it was the right field for me.
15.
I have wanted to be an SLP since I was fourteen. I developed nodules and found the therapy extremely interesting. I found out a bit more about what SLPs do through research. Having known since I was a child I wanted to do something that would be interacting with individuals (especially working with children) I immediately knew what I wanted to do for my lifes work.
Question 8 of 30
What are your salary expectations?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Yes, it was very rewarding to see them improve their relationships with others through improved communication skills.
2.
Yes, I have helped a patient learn to take train from home to downtown.
3.
I have had success with many patients/students in my several years as a SLP. I remember one patient in particular that used very few words and was very intelligible, as we worked through threapy he became more intelligible during each session. He began talking with people in the waiting room and soon was ready to be ischarged from services. It was a very rewarding experieince for both of us.
4.
Yes, I helped a 5th grader see the value in accomplishing his communication goals in articulation. It was very rewarding.
5.
I had an undergrad assistant in clinic and I really loved helping her and letting her get experience working with a patient. It was really fun to build someone up like that in a positive way - especially after having some negative experiences myself. It was great to be able to put all of my positive experiences with supervisors into practice with someone who was working under me.
6.
Yes, I have and I find this aspect of speech language pathology to be a very rewarding one.
7.
Yes of course I had. I had worked in Charity organization about 8 years, and very happy that had this experience in my live. It is very thankful work, to tell the truth.
8.
I had a patient who had suffered a right cva and as a result had dysarthria and oralpharyngeal dysphagia. When I began to see her she was on a pureed diet for pleasure feedings and tube feedings for nutrition. After 12 weeks of therapy we repeated the MBSS and she was able to safely swallow thickened liquids and so we were able to advance her diet. She would call our clinic just to tell us the different beverages she was experiementing with with her thickener and it really made my day to get those calls.
9.
Indeed. I have helped many patients and students during my career and it was the most satisfying experience without doubt.
10.
Each day a student walks not my room and we both learn and try hard is success.
11.
Extremely- I really like to see kids once they have the tools to advocate for themselves.
12.
Very rewarding. I love seeing them improve and helping them to feel better about daily activities.
13.
Yes, I have been able to see results of my work and it is very rewarding. To be able to dismiss a client after both of you have worked so hard to achieve therapy goals is amazing!
14.
Yes. I helped my nephew financing his education. He graduated and has a good job now. It felt good because I was able to help not only him but his mother who is a widow.
15.
I have helped many students before. Being able to provide that student with a method of communication and teach them how to use it to express themselves is a wonderful gift to witness and be a part of.
Question 9 of 30
Would your friends or family, say you have a good patience?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Most definitely. They know I am very positive and patient, giving my clients the full time to feel comfortable and make progress.
2.
Yes, I have a lot of patience which I developed through years of working with young children.
3.
Yes, I am patient and willing to try new ways/modify techniques to maximize success.
4.
They would say that I have very good patience. You need to have good patience in this field. Often times you do not see sudden progress.
5.
Yes, my mam always say to me.
6.
My family and friends would definitely say I am a patient person for the most part. I am able to empathize with other people, however, I do expect a certain level of self responsibility from patients and their families, but no more than what I would expect from my own family.
7.
Yes, patience is definitely one of my best qualities. I grew up in a large family which taught me to be patient and to wait for my turn. Patience is an important quality to possess as an speech and language pathologist when working with kids.
8.
Definitely. I always hear praises about my patience with kids and other difficult to handle situations.
9.
Yes especially when the going gets tough I can roll with the punches and adapt to various stressful situtiona.
10.
Yes, I think that they would tell you I am very patient in most activities in my life.
11.
Yes, people who know me would say I am very patient.
12.
Absolutely, especially when it comes to young children. My own children, however, may beg to differ!
13.
Yes. Having a 6 month year old at home has taught me to slow down and enjoy the moment. Having patience is critical when your woke at 3 am for feedings and up again at five for some play time.
14.
Yes, I believe that it is one my strengths.
15.
Yes, I have a lot of patience. It has been strengthened by learning to assess the underlying antecedent that caused the behavior, which is commonly a communication breakdown.
Question 10 of 30
Do you prefer working with children or adults?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I prefer to work with children, but I am very open to working with adults, and think more experience with them would be very beneficial.
2.
They are both so different, and I guess that is the best ting about being able to work with both. With children, it's amazing to know that the changes you can instill now can affect them in a positive way for the rest of their lives. With adults, it's really interesting to learn about the lives they have already lead and to use those experiences to learn the skills they need.
3.
I would perfer to work with adults because I feel that children can be pronouncing words a certain way because they aren't grown up yet.
4.
It really doesn't matter.
5.
Children, but I am very open to working with adults.
6.
I like working with both. I have had a lot of exposure with children. However, I would love to see the adult side of things more.
7.
I enjoy working with both children and adults. I have had positive experiences with both age groups. At this time I would prefer to work with adults because I highly enjoy watching their progress after a stroke, brain injury, or when having swallowing difficulties.
8.
I enjoy both, but I really love working with kids.
9.
I have worked with both and have enjoyed both tremendously.
10.
Working with children is more interesting, you become child, but working with adults is interesting too.
11.
I prefer working with children. Most of my prior experience has involved working with children. I enjoy being part of their acquisition of language and the learning of it rather than having to re-teach speech and language.
12.
I enjoy working with both children and adults. However the benefits of working with each is different.
13.
I prefer working with the adult population. Most of my experience has been with adults. I feel that I can easilly relate to them and provide assistance with current d eficits.
14.
I much prefer working with children.
15.
I prefer working with children because I can be more of myself with them.
Question 11 of 30
Describe your clinical experience during your internship or residency programs.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
In undergrad, we were given the opportunity to work with a client in the aushc. This allowed me to add clinic experience to my classroom knowledge and really enhance my initial experience with speech therapy.
2.
I had experience with dysarthria, stuttering, swallow problems.
3.
I was in our university clinic for my first year of graduate school. During this time, I worked with a elderly man who had a stroke and needed to work on social communication skills as well as word retrieval skills. Following that, I worked with children with articulation disorders, a 2-year old child who was non-verbal and was suspected to have autism, and a child who was internationally adopted from Russia who came to us to work on social language and literacy skills. Once I was off-site, I worked in a nursing home with adults with swallowing difficulties as well as cognitive therapy needs. Following that, I was placed in a hospital setting in an Autism center where we evaluated and treated individuals with Autism from ages 2-21 years. Lastly, I was placed in a school setting in which I worked with k-5th grade students with speech and language impairments.
4.
One of the experiences that helped me during my future was the fact I had to work in different circumstances such out in the hallway, in book closets and never really had a room of my own.
5.
The clinical experience that I had during undergrad was at St. Elizabeth hospital where I got the privilege to job shadow. Here, I got to see a great deal that goes into our profession and how one day changes from the next. Within my days here I got to be at the outpatient clinic, the hospital itself and also down in radiology for the swallow studies. Another aspect of clinical experience that I gained as a undergrad was learning the technique and ability to write lesson plans and SOAP notes for our clients.
6.
I did not have experience working clinically with individuals during my undergraduate studies but I had hours of clinical observation throughout my coursework.
7.
I did not have any clinical experience in undergrad.
8.
I had the opportunity to observe multiple clinicians in multiple settings during my undergraduate level. I then also had the opportunity to work under a speech clinician in the school setting for 3 days a week during my final semester at Geneva College. I was able to have my own case load and worked with multiple disorders. I made multiple lesson plans and even made my own materials to help with corresponding lessons.
9.
During my undergraduate education, we were not provided with any hands-on clinical experience. I did, however, observe many different therapy sessions in a wide variety of settings, including schools and hospitals.
10.
Per ASHA's laws, I have completed 25 hours of clinical observations prior to graduate school. These observations ranged from videos, to actual therapy sessions in elementary and high school.
11.
In undergrad, I did 25 hours of observation time within the field. I spent a week in a school job-shadowing an SLP, as well as a week in a hospital. It was an eye-opening experience for me. At the time I had limited information on what an SLP actually does throughout the day. The experience gave me a snapshot of what it is like to be an SLP, which I believe helped verify that I chose the correct major for me.
12.
I had the experience to complete 25 clinical hours within a skilled nursing facility. I was able to observe several patients who were diagnosed with dysphagia and cognitive disabilities.
13.
I have only acquired observation hours while being in undergrad. This ranged from being exposed to different disorders to watching therapists implement treatment strategies and assessments.
14.
During my undergrad experience I had many observation hours.
15.
The clinical experience that I had in my undergraduate career was shadowing a speech therapist from an elementary school. I think that was one of my favorite parts about undergrad. I loved being able to see therapy sessions first hand and get a chance to help out every once in awhile. I think that clinical experience is so important because it really immerses you in the field and gives you a first hand look at what you’ll actually be doing in the field!
Question 12 of 30
Why are you the best candidate for us?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I bring the diversity to the field also I am able to help students that speaks spanish and also I am aware of diffrent cultures.
2.
I am not new working with children, I think you will find from my resume that I have many years of experience working with children and working in schools to hone my skills in helping, connecting and motivating students. As a male, I think I bring a unique perspective to helping kids that may be otherwise difficult to motivate.
3.
Because I have over 25 years of working in speech therapy and I work well with children and staff.
4.
Because I have over 25 years of working in speech therapy and I work well with children and staff.
5.
Because I have experience, I love child I fill happy when I do my work.
6.
I am the best candidate for you because I am a hard-worker, a team player, a life-long learner an will not disappoint you. I am so passionate about speech and language therapy and feel that I am very qualified for this position.
7.
I am felxible and able to work in a variety of settings, I feel that I can provide the servies needed for each individual patient and assit them in improving their daily life .
8.
I skipped some questions and couldn't go back to answer them, that doesn't help. I am a good candidate because I am willing to learn, enjoy research and passing on my knowledge to students.
9.
I am the best candidate because my commitment to excellent work standards will add value to your company. One of the first things I learned was that hard work is the key to success. I'm aware that working hard makes the difference and I have put in the hours and effort to ensure I can offer the best services. My motivation, desire and drive push me to achieve more and more everyday with the mindset to never settle.
10.
Not only do I have the required experience, skills, and qualifications for the job, I am a driven individual who strives to do the best at any task I am given. I am passionate about speech language pathology and am eager to begin my journey providing services that make a positive impact!
11.
I am a hard worker and I work well with others. Speech therapy is fun and I enjoy the diversity of the clients that I will have. Even though I do not have much field experience yet, I am always willing and excited to learn new information. If hired for this position, I will do my best to provide the best for each client. I am very passionate about my job and I will continue working as hard as I can to become the best speech therapist I can be.
12.
I believe that I am the best candidate for this position because I am high achieving, very motivated, and always willing to learn new methods or approaches. I love working with all populations and will always treat my patients with the utmost respect.
13.
I believe I'm the best candidate for this position because I have a strong educational and experiential background. My time at Clarion provided me with a strong background in a variety of different disorders and treatments. I'm also a fast learner and willing to learn new and different therapy approaches to ensure my treatment is beneficial to my clients.
14.
I feel like I am the best candidate for you because I am a therapist that truly cares for every client that I would have. With the experiences that I have had throughout my life, I am able to put myself in the client's shoes and help them to the best of the ability that I can.
15.
I am the best candidate because I am motivated with an incredible work ethic. I strive to always do my best work and utilize the best therapy practices for my clients. I will never stop learning and will continue to grow within this field.
Question 13 of 30
What experience do you have working with language disorders?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I've worked in paediatric outpatient clinic where we see clients with language disorders. Following detailed assessment with something like the celf we then provide individual and group therapy where we find the key is to find a good language model, ie a parent and train them to be an example and to give lots of positive opportunities to practice, as well as how to give constructive and positive feedback to the child.
2.
I have worked with students with language disorders for 18 years.
3.
I have worked with children with delayed language to help develop vocab and age appropriate length of sentences, and with children with autism and other special needs.
4.
I have worked with both pediatric and adult language disorders from expressive/receptive language deficits, aphasia, apraxia, and cognitive disorders for 18 years within a variety of settings.
5.
During my internship I worked with individuals with word finding difficulties, expressive and receptive aphasia.
6.
I have worked with a variety of clients with language disorders during my graduate studies, including children with specific language impairment and bilingual children with language disorders.
7.
I have experience with stuttering, with aphasia, with sounds impairments and e. G
8.
I have a lot of experience working with children with language disorders. The majority of my caseload at one of the schools I worked at last year were children with language disorders. I have found that vocabulary instruction is effective, as well as providing a language-rich environment and modeling what good language structure looks like and sounds like.
9.
During my clinical training in Degree and Internship, I had more experience with the Adult population diagnosed with Language disorders. But During my experience at my previous employers, I had more of a pediatric case load, mostly with language disorders.
10.
It was good and motivated.
11.
I have experience in working with patients with expressive and receptive aphasia, cognition.
12.
Much of my experience has been with language disorders. Specifically, language delays where lots of stimulation and exposure to vocabulary and syntax structures was the focus.
13.
I work with children with limited vocabulary and speaks in 2-3 words. Building vocabulary is one of the goals. I encourage them to converse by making them describe a picture.
14.
I have worked with receptive and expressive language disorders in children with varying disabilities. Autism has been my primary population to service with language disorders. Communicating wants and needs using multiple forms and modalities. As well as answering "wh" questions, syntax, pragmatic social skills, and semantics.
15.
I have worked with language disorders at multiple levels. Both in peridatric evaluation, an individual client at the Edward's campus, preschool language at the KU Lawrence campus, reading and social language for two adults with Downs Syndrome, and my clinical practicum experiences at Regency Place Elementary School.
Question 14 of 30
What are your thoughts about inclusion and pull outs as therapy models?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I think it is the least restrictive method and I think it works best unless there are extreme limitations.
2.
I think it is the least restrictive method and I think it works best unless there are extreme limitations.
3.
I think it is the least restrictive method and I think it works best unless there are extreme limitations.
4.
I think both models can be very successful if done correctly.
5.
I believe it depends on the student and whether or not direct intervention needs to occur to make progress.
6.
My thoughts are that I believe as long as a child can learn within the classroom and the SLPA can push in therapy that is the best environment. However, I support the idea that some children really need that one on one session within the speech room.
7.
One should work and educate himself during all his life, becuse our life change very fast.
8.
I like inclusion because it gives the student a chance to be with other students on their grade level, however, pull outs are necessary for those that need 1-1 sessions which is determined by the testing and IEP.
9.
I think both are great tools that help our children enrolled in speech language services. However, depending on the needs and characteristics of the child pull out may have more benefits than inclusion. Pull out therapy models allow us to have that one on one attention or allow us to provide therapy in small groups. Some may think that small groups would pose a problem but in fact it does the opposite. Its a great way to allow feedback from their peers and also shows how one should act in the environment with getting the chance to have interactions. Inclusion is also great for those students that may be embarrassed by getting pulled out of class to go to the speech room. It still offers benefits but not at the expense of their self esteem.
10.
I think, when possible, inclusion provides the most positive outcome for individuals in therapy. It is extremely important for them to have the opportunity to be with their typical peers, who also can be helpful for therapy because they provide good examples. The pull out model is good for individual therapy but I feel allows for little carry over of techniques in to other settings and situations.
11.
I think both are very effective models of therapy. Depending on the age group, each one has its pros and cons. I think pull out model is most effective with younger ages because it gives them something to look forward to since they do not have to sit in the classroom like their peers.
12.
I believe that both inclusion and pull out as a therapy model can be very beneficial. It is a right that everyone has fair and equal opportunity of learning and I believe that these models may be one of the best opportunities for the patients.
13.
I believe that both models can be beneficial to specific needs. Inclusion is a great way for the child to communicate with peers in an educational setting. It often proves beneficial for those who need treatment with the social aspects of communication. It gives more opportunity to interact with peers and to be involved in the classroom setting. However, pull out therapy is great for one-on-one treatment. It's a way to target the specific needs of a child. It can also be beneficial for those with auditory processing disorders, attention deficits, or traumatic brain injury. It provides a quiet environment for the child to be focused and engaged.
14.
For younger children up to elementary school I like the pull out method of therapy because most children like to leave the classroom into another room for therapy. The inclusion model is a good model as well if the client needs to stay in the same classroom environment for a better therapy session.
15.
Both models have pros and cons. Some situations, such as an autism support classroom, would thrive on a push-in model. The therapist would have the opportunity to address multiple students in a short time frame. However, some students have such great communication needs, a pull out model with directed, personalized attention would be best. Again, it should truly depend on the student's needs.
Question 15 of 30
Describe how you currently work or communicate with caregivers?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I allow my supervising SLP to do most of the formal communication other than general info and info such as what we did in the session.
2.
I feel it is very important to consider the cultural background while communicating with the caregivers. It is also very important to listen to their concerns and needs. My priority is to explain the pertaining details with patience and listen to their response. It is important to make decisions that involve caregivers and satisfy their concerns to the maximum.
3.
We have several ways. I communicate via email, parent/teacher conferences, homework sent home and IEPs. These avenues help communicate day to day activities along with the the overall goals.
4.
Now I do not work, but before I use to work in children neurologists hospital, then in Charity organization, It was really full of result and I was satisfy this years.I had many patients whom I helped.
5.
In the tenure with my previous employer ie, Five Pediatric services, there was a huge focus on involving the families of children we treated, into the therapy program and therapy sessions. This gave me expertise on handling the caregivers in a way that will assist the success of the therapy program. It is crucial to motivate the caregivers as well as give them a good understanding about the patients findings and prognosis.
6.
Very communicative and am interested to motivate and hive hope them.
7.
I commuicated on a daily basis with nurses, aids, dietician and family members regarding current deficits and use of diet modificsations or strategies that assist with general care of patient.
8.
If given the chance to talk with the parent or caregiver, I normally discuss what goes on during the session and then ask them to give the student an opportunity for language stimulation at home.
9.
Caregivers are the base to help with the person involved and need to be aware of concerns, it is good to establish a good rapport to gain progress.
10.
I communicate with caregivers in a way that helps build a relationship of trust. I ensure my vocabulary is presented in nontechnical terms. I always check my body language so that it is open and not sending any nonverbal signals of annoyance or that I don't want to be there. I always make it a point to stop throughout my explanations to make sure they are following and understanding me. If there are questions, I may bring out my notes to have visuals to go along with my words or even invite them into the therapy session to watch.
11.
When communicating with caregivers it is important to first consider their cultural background. It is important to listen to their concerns and needs and to explain and provide information in a way that they can understand while also allowing an opportunity for them to ask questions.
12.
I treat caregivers with respect. I do sometimes have to be considerate of the terminology that I use, because not everyone understands the complex terminology of disorders and treatment.
13.
Currently, I am not submerged in a setting where I work or communicate with any caregivers, but I when in that situation I know that I am very respectful to him or her. I believe that collaboration is very important and believe that their opinions do matter. I believe that I would have a very good relationship with any caregivers that I may encounter.
14.
At the beginning and end of each therapy session, I try to check in with the caregiver to see what their current concerns are and to let them know of the progress of the child. I make sure they understand what it is we work on in therapy. It also allows time to make sure the caregiver is comfortable with our current goals or express their thoughts and feelings about therapy and how they wish to see it influence the child.
15.
For any caregiver, being one for my family members or one for a client, I will always be sincere and professional. I make sure to keep them in the loop either face to face, or through technology with the progress of my clients and if they need to work on anything outside of the therapy session.
Question 16 of 30
What speech therapy method do you practice the most?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Small group therapy, integrating the individual goals.
2.
Playing, speaking with children much, articulation massage.
3.
I use scaffolding the most in speech therapy. I think it is important in order for the child to learn the skill and to acquire the skill. It is important to recognize when you need to change your level of support.
4.
Dysphagia- modification of diets and educating patient, familu and staff on use of compenstraties to improve safety of swallowing.
5.
The method I use most is working from auditory discrimination of correct/incorrect productions, production of sound in isolation in various positions of words, phrases and sentences. Then generalizing to spontaneous speech.
6.
I do the articulation therapy process practicing first on sound isolation, then syllables, word, sentence and then conversation level.
7.
I really enjoy using storybooks to work on all aspects of language. So guided storybook intervention.
8.
It depends on the student's IEP and testing results which encourage the type of therapy to use, language, speech programs using Chompsky, Skinner or Browns stages,
9.
The speech therapy method that I practice most varies because I want to do whats best for my client rather than what I am most comfortable with as a clinician.
10.
I think it's important when necessary to use the push-in model and integrate individual goals of therapy in the classroom. It is essential that the child, if capable, has the opportunity to be with his or her peers.
11.
As I do not have much experience with field work yet, I am not sure which method I practice the most yet.
12.
One of the methods that I used frequently while in the school based setting during my undergraduate clinical experience was five minute articulation. This approach focuses on drilling the students intensively for 5 minutes a day, multiple times a week. I was able to see many children succeed and master multiple sounds within a shorter time span.
13.
I wouldn't say that there is a single method I practice most. I make sure that each client receives treatment specific to their needs. With that said though, I have the most experience in working with children with autism. For them, we tend to focus on the social aspects of communication. With them, I often work on conversational turn-taking, eye contact, and fluency and intonation patterns. One method that I tend to implement is the creation and use of a visual intonation board. With this, the child is able to visual see how their intonation should fall or rise when making a statement vs. Asking a question. Since children with autism tend to be visual learners, I've found this method extremely effective.
14.
Since I have not been in a clinical setting with actual patients yet, I have not practiced any therapy methods in real life yet. Once I am in therapy though, I will use the one-to-one interaction method with the use of fun activities to keep the patient motivated throughout the session.
15.
In a perfect world, I would always practice client directed therapy. However, not all clients will benefit from that model. It is circumstantial and very much based on the individual client. Some clients need the structure of drill, where others will never succeed with drill therapy. Each client is unique with unique communicative needs.
Question 17 of 30
What are your research interests?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I am interested in oral motor therapy and staying current in therapy techniques.
2.
According to my experience I should say that after any assessment of my patient I will research for new approaches and methods in assessment and treatment, like stuttering, aphasia.
3.
As a school-based Speech Pathologist, I am interested in a variety of topics.
4.
I am interested in fluency and the nuances of treatment for it. I am also interested in PD and the research I did on increasing approaches to increase intensity in PD patients.
5.
I am interested in the preschool autistic population and the use of ipad technology to facilitate communication.
6.
I am very interested in learning more about Autism and the different intervention strategies that are used to benefit children in their environment.
7.
I am interested in researching Attention Deficit disorders and the impact this disorder has on communication skills.
8.
Now I am interested in reading English medical literature, especially concerning with my occupaition.
9.
I have a passion for working with non-verbal children who require augmentative and assistive technology in order to communicate. Since technology is forever changing and growing, I am constantly researching and try to stay current on augmentative and alternative communication.
10.
I would like to involve myself in research in the field of Language disorders, especially on quantifying the results of different Language therapy strategies in patients with Acquired Language disorders.
11.
Develop new communication forms and functions.
12.
Alzheimers Disease andn swallowing deficits.
13.
I am interested in learning more about the brain and how it impacts speech any language delays.
14.
The research I participated in for school requirements was surrounding the speech mechanism and ALS. I am interested in voice and swallowing research, because there is a strong need for it.
15.
Many. The computer offers many issues and types of problems I can research. It intriegues me to read information or ask questions.
Question 18 of 30
What excercise do you encourage the most for NS-OME?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I rarely do non-speech oral motor exercises. I would recommend some talk tools for jaw stability.
2.
Tongue exercises if it is with articulation like the sound /r/. Have the train the tongue to move in different directions.
3.
It really depends on the child and what their biggest problem is. The most effect oral motor exercises for children are typically labial and lingual exercises.
4.
Blowing, kissing, looking in the mirror and smiling, sticking out tongue, retracting tongue. Protruding lips.
5.
I think tongue exercises are the most important/effective since the tongue is involved in the articulation of almost all speech sounds.
6.
In my education, I was always told not to focus on non- speech oral motor exercise.
7.
Since I do not have much experience with NS-OME, I am not sure which exercises I would encourage the most.
8.
I believe that the most beneficial exercise would consist of exercising the cheeks and lips to allow for better air pressure and articulation support. This would include blowing motions, puffing out the cheeks, and making kissing lips.
9.
I currently do not have experience in using NS-OME. However, I'd be willing to learn about the different exercises to possibly implement in a treatment plan for future clients.
10.
If I am in a situation where I have to use a Non-Speech Oral Motor Exercise, I would most likely use cheek puffing or tongue wags. Both help with tongue movements for articulation and proper breathing techniques.
11.
I am a strong believer that NS-OME do not have evidential support for use in therapy. However, with regards to a patient in a hospital setting, I can understand having them become more aware of their own oral cavity, if that is what the situation calls for.
12.
When it comes to the NS-OME, it really depends on the child and the most difficult obstacles. Some exercises that I encourage are: blowing, wagging the tongue back and forth, elevating the tongue to nose and to chin, blowing a kiss, curling of the tongue, and also puffing of the cheeks.
13.
As a young speech- language pathologist I do not have experience with NS-OME, and do not have a recommendation of exercise.
14.
Honestly, NS-OME isn’t something I have learned a lot about or have any experience with. But I am open to learning and trying new things.
15.
The top exercise encouraged would be /r/ articulation therapy.
Question 19 of 30
What are your experiences working with articulation?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I have a great deal of experience working with children who present with articulation errors. I have worked with children as young as 4, as well as children who are 18.
2.
I have both treatment and evaluation experience regarding articulation, most frequently with school aged children.
3.
I worked with child who has cerebral fault and as you know they have oral cavity and muscles impairments. We together did oral cavities massage, tang massage and exercising them work with breath and so on.
4.
I have a lot of experience with working on articulation. When working with individuals on the articulation of speech sounds, it is important to work on the placement of the articulators, discuss the manner in which the speech sound is produced and whether or not you use your voice for the sound. It is also important to incorporate auditory discrimination activities so the individual knows what the sound sounds like. I like to provide reinforcement intermittently and provide the individual with a lot of the practice and repetition of the speech sound.
5.
I had a few very motivated children with misarticulation during my clinical training at the Speech Pathology department at the JSS Hospital in Mysore. The parents of these children were as enthusiatic as me in reaching the therapy goals. This could have also contributed to the success of therapy in these children, in a very short time frame.
6.
We can see good prognosis.
7.
Some articulation treatment with children and adults but is on the lower level of my experience.
8.
I have had a lot of experience working with articulation and phonological disorders.
9.
I enjoy working with articulation with students. Sometimes they are not hearing the phoneme or don't know how to make a sound. They also need a reason to speak and communicate.
10.
My experience with working with articulation is having to do two different cases with test administration, scoring, analysis and preparing a treatment plan. The KLPA2 and Golden Fristoe were used in the one assessment and the BBTOP was used in the others.
11.
I have some experience working with articulation with my younger sister. She had trouble producing her /s/ and /z/ sounds and I would model them for her and sometimes shine a light in my mouth so she could see my tongue better.
12.
I have had limited experience with articulation, but I have had some experience with multiple phonemes. While working on the different phonemes I had the opportunity to try out multiple techniques. During this time I saw not only improvement, but success and phonemes being mastered.
13.
At this time, I don't have much experience in the area of articulation. However, I have an educational background on different articulation errors and treatment approaches, and would be more than willing to learn more and implement these approaches with future clients.
14.
Like stated earlier in the interview, I have no hands-on experiences with articulation with clients. I will be learning about articulation in-depth next fall in graduate school, and from there I should learn the right tools in order to work with a client with articulation difficulties.
15.
I currently have an articulation client on my caseload. I believe the starting point for articulation therapy is a discussion about sounds with the client. It is important to evaluate stimulability and make the client aware of misarticulations.
Question 20 of 30
What kind of help do you need to do your best work?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I like to use a transdisciplinary approach to help my students to reach their full potential. To do this, I would need good communication with the family, teacher, ot, pt and other professionals working with the student.
2.
I need collaboration and support from my supervising slp.
3.
I need collaboration and support from my supervising slp.
4.
I need collaboration and support from my supervising slp.
5.
A positive, respectful and trustworthy environment.
6.
Knowledge of the childs current level of functioning and their likes and dislikes.
7.
Help children and adults with disabilities to improve their communication skills.
8.
I need a supervisor available to answer questions that might arise.
9.
I need just support and friendly surrounding.
10.
In order to do my best work, I like to have a lot of resources and variety. I think a person gets bored when you work on the same thing everyday using the same materials. In order to do my best work, I like to mix things up every so often and I also like to make the activity interactive. I like to theme my activities to the holiday, season, or anything else significant.
11.
Space to work and access to good therapy material.
12.
Clear understanding of expectations, resources to complete theraputic activities, known chain of command and knowlege of documentation system.
13.
I need to be able to bounce ideas of other professionals and work collaboratively to be able to do my best.
14.
Good materials and resources.
15.
My weakest area is the commputer. Once some one shows me the program to use, I can be on my own. Things such as putting info on flash drives, is a weak area.
Question 21 of 30
What are your experiences working with cognitive disabilities?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I worked three years in LTF that include geriatric patients with cognitive linguistic deficits. Patients with dementia and language deficits composed a large percentage of our coaseload. Also patients post MVA / TBI usually exhibite deficits in memory, excutive functions and attention.
2.
3 years experience in rehab and acute settings assessing diagnosing and providing inter-d management of cognitie deficits. Patients presenting with progressive neuro deficits, including dementia, also post stroke, MVA's TBI's. Run both individual and group therapy to reduce impairments, provide education and give compensation strategies to the client and families. Expereince with neglect/inattention, memory, attention, and executive deficits.
3.
I have experience working with cognitive disabilities during my practicum in aphasia. I currently work with children and do not have the opportunity.
4.
I have worked with students with cognitive impairments and I provide multi-sensory cueing, modeling and repetition to aid them in improving their communication skills.
5.
I have experience in acute rehab and in outpatient with patients with post-concussive syndrome.
6.
I have patience with cognitive disabilities, it is very hard work, but when you achieve even small result it is rewarding.
7.
I worked in a nursing home in graduate school and provided cognitive therapy to individuals who had recently fallen or were diagnosed with dementia. We would work on activities of daily living, memory books and word recall strategies. I have also worked with children with cognitive disabilities including children with down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and children with low intelligence.
8.
Larage amount of experience since I have worked with a geriatric popilation for majority of career. Memory strategies established and education of staff and fammily.
9.
As in TBI, students may need more visuals, more information to help understand our language and concepts.
10.
My experience working with cognitive disabilities is that I volunteered to be apart of special olympics organization. It was a very fulfilling experience.
11.
I have no clinical experience working with cognitive disabilities but have had hours of observation observing individuals with cognitive disabilities.
12.
A member of my family is in a relationship with someone who has a son with Down Syndrome. That was my first exposure to cognitive disabilities. I never thought of him as being any different than me, other than him being close to my age but functioning at a much younger level. I still had fun with him and I still included him in activities. I also volunteer at the Special Olympics. These events were so much fun. I was amazed by everyone and how athletic some of them were. Because of my initial exposure to cognitive disabilities, I was so surprised to see how high functioning some other people with Down Syndrome were. I always thought that everyone was the same. Learning from experience about the diversity of disorders was a great experience for me and really opened my eyes so much more.
13.
I have never had experience working with any type of population who may have a cognitive disability, but I would be willing to learn more about that population in preparation to work with them.
14.
My initial clinical coursework was at a local retirement home, where I was able to work with dementia patients. I've also worked one-on-one with TBI and intellectual disabled patients. These experiences exposed me to many different patients and allowed me to implement a variety of treatment strategies.
15.
Even though I have not worked with cognitive impaired patients in a clinical environment, I have worked with them whenever I worked at Disney. I have learned from the experience how to interact with a guest with cognitive disabilities, and I hope to use that experience in the clinical setting.
Question 22 of 30
How would your current supervisor describe you?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I attended _____ university which has a rural focus, with an aim to retain country people in country jobs. It equips us to specifically deal with issues around indigenous health, and difficulties in providing health education, assessment and therapy to regional and remote areas. It also looked at alternative methods to achieve this, like training people within the community and telehealth, and different models of service provision.
2.
I have an AA degree in slpa, and completed two slpa internships, one school based, one clinically based with severe population.
3.
I received an education based on the ideas of theory and how each mechanism, being voice/swallowing mechanisms or cognition, functions properly and what it looks like to have a disorder. We also focused on assessment and therapy procedures. Keeping up with the best and current evidence based practice was emphasized at each level. We also received intense therapy training with patients ranging 18 months to 90 years focusing primarily on speech, language, and cognition.
4.
My graduate education has been intensive. I began working in the clinic the second week of classes. Each semester I worked with one adult and one child with very different communication difficulties.
5.
My graduate education consisted of a wide variety of classes and clinical experiences that I believe, prepared me greatly for my career.
6.
I received a Master of Arts degree in speech language pathology from the University of Northern Iowa.
7.
I graduated from university and become speech therapist.
8.
As previously mentioned, I completed my graduate education at St. Louis University as well. Being in a city provided me and my fellow classmates with many different opportunities for our externships as well as the opportunity to work with a variety of different populations as well as socio-economic statuses. We had a small class size, supportive faculty and many opportunities to discover which path you wanted to take (i. E. Medical, educational, geriatrics, pediatrics, etc).
9.
Kent State Universit where in completed clinical experience in the university voice clinic, English Language Proficiency clinic, Aural rehab clinic, Family child learning center, and a practicum at the Garfield Hospital in CLeveland Ohio.
10.
My graduate education involved a lot of hands on practical experiences in different settings. I had experience in a hospital setting, working with older adults in a nursing home and with children in an elementary school.
11.
I paid as I took a course. Research was enjoyable. I was an older student and paired with other students, one student was from a foriegn country and we compiled a book together about early childhood language.
12.
My graduate education is also taking place at Clarion University of Pennsylvania. Some may say that staying at your undergraduate school was playing it safe but I think the opposite. I feel I will be more than ready to enter the profession. Staying here I anticipate a better opportunity because not only would I be more comfortable but I have the great staff standing behind me whom have made my undergraduate career the best it could be.
13.
I currently attend Clarion University of Pennsylvania. I am involved in coursework that touches on a variety of subjects. I will have the opportunity to work with clients in our on campus clinic and will have real-life experience when I am on my externship.
14.
I am currently in my first semester of graduate school at Clarion University of Pennsylvania. It was a huge change from undergraduate school. I enjoyed my undergraduate career, but graduate school felt more productive to me than undergraduate school did. I wasn't used to having a majority of CSD classes in my course load. I feel as if I learn so much more in one day of graduate classes than I did in one day of undergraduate classes. Grad school is challenging, but it is also more exciting to me, as well as more rewarding.
15.
I am currently finishing my graduate degree at Clarion University, located in Clarion, PA. Clarion is a well known school which has a that is ASHA accredited program. I have had classes dealing with multiple areas of communication disorders including: aphasia, motor speech disorders, stuttering, children language disorders, articulation, Augmentative and Alternative Communication and multiple other courses.
Question 23 of 30
Speech therapy can cost your patient a lot of money, do you worry about the cost for the patient when doing your job?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
No, I hope to work in the government sector, where patients do not have to pay for speech pathology services.
2.
Actually I will chose the best for my patient, for patents who could not pay our sessions fee I could implement some strategies to cowork whit them.
3.
I sympathize with the patient regarding the cost. However, I am aware that the therapy will assist them to reach their full potential and would not be available without the cost.
4.
Yes, the cost is important for the patient. If the patient cannot afford speech therapy and decide not to go, it can really hurt the child and their speech production and progress. They may not get the needs necessary.
5.
No of course, I have experience working as a volunteer and I was satisfy really with result of remediation.
6.
Yes, definitely. Since therapies are costly, it is important to me to stay current in order to provide the best therapy I can.
7.
Yes I do. I know that many insurance companies do not cover speech therapy or only cover a minimal amount of visits. I try to be aware of the coverage and do the best I can to provide services that benefit the patient in a cost effective manner as quickly as possible.
8.
I consider the patient first and why I am there for him/her.
9.
Yes, I worry about the cost to my patient when I am doing my job. I worry because it is also my job to make sure that the services I am providing are covered under their insurance or that my place of work takes their coverage. I do not want my patients to have to be stuck with a bill because the lack of acknowledgment from me to fulfill my duties.
10.
Yes I do. I know that many insurance companies do not cover speech therapy or only cover a minimal amount of visits. I try to be aware of the coverage and do the best I can to provide services that benefit the patient in a cost effective manner as quickly as possible.
11.
Yes. I do not want to be wasting my patient's time or money. I want to treat every second as valuable and make sure that they are benefitting from every minute working with me.
12.
If I had a patient who couldn't afford to come to therapy every week for multiple sessions, I would try hard to be very flexible with him or her. I would send home worksheets every week so they practice as much as possible and then hopefully I could eliminate the amount of sessions needed per week. I want to improve the quality of life for each patient so that he or she may succeed in life rather than try to make a larger profit for myself.
13.
Of course I would! I understand that money is what determines how long or if a patient goes into therapy or not. Since I know that I will make sure that I use all the time I have to provide therapy wisely so that the patient can get the best care possible.
14.
Of course. As a speech therapist, I think it's difficult not to worry about all aspects of the patient's life. You want them to improve as a whole, not just in speech. Currently, I have the luxury of working in a nonprofit clinic that works with clients financially. However, I am aware of the realities of cost and the stress that can put on a client.
15.
Yes, I have thought about the cost that comes along with therapy for my patient. Once I begin practicing, I will try my best to provide services for my patient that are cost effective and educate my clients on techniques that can be performed at home.
Question 24 of 30
Are you okay working the same career for 15 years?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Yes, as long as I am helping others and continuing my own learning.
2.
Yes, being a speech pathologist for 30 years is something I plan to do. Unlike doing the same mundane duties as in another career, I believe that I will be working with a variety of different clients, helping them better their lives.
3.
Absolutely. I want to see the kids I work with improve in overall communication.
4.
Yes, with great pleaser if I be able to do my best.
5.
Yes. I think the nice thing about speech and language therapy is that every day is different and every child is different. I also think it is nice that as a speech therapist, you can work in a variety of settings.
6.
Yes. I love working adults and the elderly. I can easily relate and have a good rapport with the majority of my patients. It is challenging but also rewarding to help those in need.
7.
Yes I am okay working the same career for 30 years because there is such a variety in this field that you can't do it all in a life time.
8.
A career in speech pathology provides extreme flexibility. I have the opportunity to work with a variety of age groups in a variety of settings. Essentially I would not have to work the "same" career because there is plenty of opportunities to move in to another aspect of the field.
9.
Yes. As long as it is in an area that I know I will enjoy being in, I will be comfortable with working there for 30 years, or even longer.
10.
I believe that this is the career that I will be working for the next 30 years easily. I have such a passion and love for this career and a love for all the people who I would be helping. I can see myself thoroughly enjoying and thriving in this profession for many more years to come.
11.
As long as if I am in a career that I enjoy doing, I am perfectly okay working the same career for 30 years.
12.
I am more than excited to work in the same field for 30 years. I think the uniqueness of being a speech pathologist is the room to grow as a therapist within the field.
13.
Certainty. The field of Speech Language pathology is great because there are so many different career paths that can be chosen. Speech Language pathology has abundant opportunities.
14.
I would be okay with this because this is something that greatly interests me and is a dream job of mine. Although, I may change the setting and scope of practice during my lifetime.
15.
Working as a speech-language pathologist for 30 years would be enjoyable because of the diverse nature of the profession.
Question 25 of 30
Do you like to work in teams or are you an individual achiever?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I enjoy working in teams and learning from other professionals.
2.
Both, I am self motivated and have alot of initiative, but I like to collaborate with other slaps and slps.
3.
I enjoy working with a team in an multidisciplinary approach but also work well as an individual SLP with my own caseload.
4.
Although I am a self-starter, I definitely work well with teams. I like collaboration and make a point to communicate with teachers and the rest of the team often to review progress.
5.
Team work and collaboration are an essential part of sucess. Teachers, therapist and administration must work together to best meet the needs of each student.
6.
I like to do both, just want to be useful.
7.
I enjoy working on teams. I think collaboration is so important in order to best serve the child or adult. Therapies are most effective when everyone is working towards one common goal and on the same page.
8.
I enjoy both. I do not have a problem working independly if needed. I feel very comfortable in providing speech services and when assistance is needed I will seek the help. I also enjoy working with nursing, social services and other therapies to achieve a continuum of care for the patient.
9.
Both...Depends on the situation.
10.
I am more of an individual achiever because I like to have that feeling of accomplishment at the end of the day. Also I like being able to learn from my mistakes and not be told what to do. However, I can also be a team player because I also believe that two heads work better than one. In the team setting you can bounce ideas off one another to ensure that what you are doing is right.
11.
Although I can successfully work alone or on a team I feel most comfortable working on a team so that I can collaborate with other professionals to ensure I'm providing the best possible therapy for my client/patient.
12.
I feel as though I work well in both. Sometimes, I feel like I may work slightly better in a team because I will always have at least one other person to help me with making decisions. While I am still in my first few years in this profession, I would like to work in teams so I can receive some feedback.
13.
I thrive in both settings because I am so high achieving and believe that the help of others can be very beneficial, but I also am able to thoroughly assess the situation to make decisions on my own.
14.
I am generally an independent worker when it comes to sessions with my clients. However, I know that it's important to converse with other professionals to ensure that my treatment approaches are beneficial to my clients. In that regard, I am more than happy to be a team player. The most important thing is that my client's are receiving the care they need, and I'm more than willing to work with a team of professionals to make sure that is being achieved.
15.
I do like working in teams because there are more insights to the same problem with a team, and sometime hearing a different opinion can help you understand the problem better.
Question 26 of 30
What is your greatest strength?
Question 27 of 30
What is your greatest weakness?
Question 28 of 30
What do you know about our clinic?
Question 29 of 30
How would your co-workers describe you?
Question 30 of 30
Tell us about yourself.

About Speech Pathology

August 18th, 2017

Human communication includes speech (articulation, intonation, rate, intensity, voice, resonance, fluency), language (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics), both receptive and expressive language (including reading and writing), and non-verbal communication such as facial expression, posture and gesture. Swallowing problems managed under speech therapy are problems in the oral and pharyngeal stages and sometimes esophageal stages of swallowing.

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