MockQuestions

Family Physician Interview Questions

To help you prepare for your Family Physician interview, here are 30 interview questions and answer examples.

Family Physician was updated by on August 31st, 2021. Learn more here.

Question 1 of 30

Tell me about a time you had to deal with significant changes in your workplace. How did you manage those changes?

How to Answer

In any healthcare setting, change is inevitable. Technology, processes, leadership, laws, and organizations change on a regular basis, and with change at a high level comes changes in work processes. For this question, it is important to stress how you are open to change when it makes the end results better for the patient. Talk about a specific change you had to endure in the workplace and express how you embraced the change.

Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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30 Family Physician Interview Questions & Answers

  • Adaptability

    1. Tell me about a time you had to deal with significant changes in your workplace. How did you manage those changes?

      How to Answer

      In any healthcare setting, change is inevitable. Technology, processes, leadership, laws, and organizations change on a regular basis, and with change at a high level comes changes in work processes. For this question, it is important to stress how you are open to change when it makes the end results better for the patient. Talk about a specific change you had to endure in the workplace and express how you embraced the change.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "During my years in college, I worked at a large grocery store as a cashier. After working there for one year, the company purchased a new touchscreen register system that replaced the old system I was familiar with. Knowing how much more efficiently and accurately I would be able to work when the changes came, I was happy when the announcement was made to our team of cashiers. Of course, others were not happy as they'd have to learn a new system. For me, knowing how much the new system would help our work process made it easy to embrace the change. Moving forward, I fully understand how the healthcare world needs to embrace change on a regular basis and you'll find that I'm a person that can help lead change management among my peers."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      1st Answer Example

      "In my previous employment roles, I have been a part of many changes that affected my day-to-day duties on the job. I have always embraced technological changes and work process advancements because, in the end, they make our jobs easier, safer, and better for individual patients. The biggest change that I had to endure was an organizational merger when a private hospital I was working for merged with a larger health system. During this merger, my day-to-day work was flipped upside down from new computer systems to work on, a new work location, a new leadership structure, and a change in pay and benefits. With a focus on the end in mind and how great it was going to be to work for a much larger and well-established employer, I was able to be a positive influence on my team for helping others embrace the change and see the light at the end of the tunnel while changes were happening."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Experienced

      "While I was in medical school, I worked in a medical lab. The lab corporation purchased some new equipment that was expected to help cut our time for delivering results significantly. When my manager announced that the new purchase was made and the machine would be arriving in two weeks, I was shocked to see that many of the teammates reacted so negatively to that change. They were not happy that they would have to learn a new machine and were so narrow-minded in their perception of how the new technology would impact their routines. My manager appreciated the fact that I was the positive member of the team was able to calm my teammates down and help them see the good that would come once we all were trained on how to operate the new piece of equipment."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "When I came from Greece, I was asked to work at a restaurant as a busser. It was hard to shift from mental work to physical work. My shift was 12-14 hours per day, and I could walk more than 20,000 thousand steps per day because the restaurant was very busy at that time. It was not easy, but I made it. The only thing that helped me was reminding myself that this job was temporary, and it allowed me to save some money and start studying for the USMLE exams."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      Working in a busy restaurant as a busser can be a physically demanding position, but it sounds like you were able to maintain focus on your ultimate goal and use the experience as motivation to pass the United States Medical Licensing Examination. Nice work! Because this question specifically asks about a "significant change" in your workplace, I suggest including more information about the change aspect. Describing your previous position in Greece will provide the interviewer with the full picture and allow them to fully comprehend how significant the differences, or changes, between the two roles were.

  • Career Goals

    2. What made you choose a career as a family physician?

      How to Answer

      Everyone has different reasons for choosing their career paths. Questions like this give an interviewer an opportunity to get to know you on a personal level. This is your chance to share things you love about the job and what drove you to choose this profession.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I have always had a heart for people. I knew when I was a teenager that I wanted to find a career that I could feel good about and, hopefully, make a difference in. Becoming a doctor was the natural choice for me."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      1st Answer Example

      "I really can't remember a time when I didn't want to be a doctor. I really can't recall if there was a specific incident that happened that made me interested or if it was just something that came naturally to me. Becoming a doctor has been one of the greatest achievements of my life. I have no regrets at all about my career choice."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Experienced

      "I suppose there are several factors that led to my final decision of pursuing medicine as a career. Most importantly, I want to help people. I have a genuine concern for others and their well-being. I knew I had the drive and determination that was necessary to complete medical school and a residency and knew that if I did that, I could position myself in a lifestyle that allows me to help other people have a better life."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "When I was in medical school I developed an interest in more than one specialty. I was interested in pediatrics, OBGYN, and psychiatry, but family medicine is the best specialty because it combines all that knowledge, my previous experience in family medicine, and preventive medicine."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Good! Your response is very clear, and you make it easy to understand the reasoning behind choosing family medicine.

  • Career Goals

    3. Have you ever considered a more concentrated specialty area rather than staying within the Family Practice realm?

      How to Answer

      One of the great things about a career in healthcare is that there are so many options. Having ever considered a career shift into a specialty area is not something that will disqualify you from being hired as a family practice physician. This question really just creates an opportunity for the interviewer to explore what areas are of interest to you. If you have considered a more concentrated specialty, share that with the interviewer, but end your answer with why you have stayed with family practice so far.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "Actually, I considered several different specialty concentrations. I thought about obstetrics and urology. I also even considered cardiology. For me, though, I really felt like general practice was a good fit and that it would give me the opportunity to take care of a broader group of patients."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      1st Answer Example

      "I did consider a career as a pediatrician at one time. However, when I began to explore options, I felt like family practice would give me an opportunity to work with a more diverse group of people. The decision to focus on family medicine has been a great fit for me."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Experienced

      "I never considered any other specialty than family medicine. I respect concentrated specialty areas and have some close friends who are specialists. It takes all of us to make a good healthcare network, and I'm happy to be a small part of it."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "For now, I would love to do family medicine, but in the future, I might try sports medicine or preventive care. Family medicine and preventive care go strongly together."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      You do an excellent job identifying other areas of medicine that interest you, and connecting preventative care to family medicine is a nice touch. To assure the interviewer you will remain with the practice for a considerable length of time if hired, I suggest concluding your response by confirming the reason(s) you prefer family medicine or are drawn to it specifically.

  • Common

    4. What would you describe as your biggest weakness?

      How to Answer

      This is probably one of the most dreaded questions in a job interview. Answering this question requires self-evaluation and honesty. Remember, whatever weakness you decide to share, make sure it is not a key characteristic needed to perform your job as a physician.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I know you may not think this about a physician, but one of my weaknesses is that I often get nervous around people I don't know. I know we all do that to a certain degree, but for me, it became something that I was very aware of. I now try to attend social activities where I know there are going to be opportunities to meet new people so that I can overcome social anxiety."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I tend to let people talk a little longer than I should, perhaps because I'm focused on listening, and it may impair my efficiency. I recognize this in myself, and I have made a conscious effort to keep a targeted map of what I need to get through during my patient encounters while maintaining empathy and care in every meeting."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      This is a helpful realization, and it's nice that you are already showing what you will do to correct this behavior during your patient encounters. It seems you are highly self-aware, which is a valuable quality.

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  • Communication

    5. How do you approach dealing with an angry patient, and why?

      How to Answer

      Knowing how you will handle a difficult situation will tell the interviewer if you have the right attitude for this job. Being a physician means you have to deal with people from very different backgrounds and with varying personalities. Give the interviewer an example of how you would handle an angry patient.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I think it is important to try and find out what has made the patient mad. If it is something such as not being called as quickly as he had expected, a simple explanation regarding what caused the delay may help calm him."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Communication

    6. Have you ever had a disagreement with a peer or co-worker, and if so, how was it handled?

      How to Answer

      Any time you work with someone else, there is a chance of having a disagreement about something at one time or another. The interviewer knows this. It's human nature for people to have their own opinions. What is important to the interviewer in this question is whether or not you are willing to compromise and work through difficult situations with your co-workers. Being unwilling to compromise or find alternative solutions to a dispute can affect everyone on the team, even if it is indirectly. Sharing a personal experience is OK, but do not embellish it to 'be the hero.'

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I am a pretty easy-going person and do my best to avoid conflict. Like anyone else, I am sure there have been times that a co-worker and I have had a difference of opinion, but there has never been an instance that the disagreement was something that would have interfered with my work."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Communication

    7. Can you share an experience you've had since practicing in which there was a misunderstanding between you and co-worker but you could laugh about it afterward?

      How to Answer

      'All work and no play is a recipe for a miserable day.' That line from an old storybook is true. Any interviewer knows that we all need to laugh and have fun from time to time. That doesn't mean that you don't take your job seriously. Sometimes funny things just happen. This is a chance for the interviewer to see that you can appreciate a little humor.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "When I had my first job at a family practice clinic, we had a young man, about 19 years old, come into the clinic for complaints of nausea, vomiting, and fever. He didn't want a shot to help with the symptoms because he was afraid it would make him too sleepy to drive. So, I gave him a Phenergan suppository that he said he could use himself without assistance. I told him we would give him some privacy and would return to the room in a few minutes. Upon returning to the exam room, I asked him if he was able to administer the medication without any problems. He replied, 'Yes, but why did you have to leave the room? I sure could use some water, though. It tasted nasty.' Needless to say, I will never forget him!"

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Compatibility

    8. What characteristics do you think are important for healthcare professionals to possess?

      How to Answer

      There is more than one reason for asking this question. First, the interviewer wants to know what qualities you think are important to perform this job. Second, and most importantly, your answer will tell the interviewer if you hold yourself to the same standard as you do others. If you want to see certain characteristics in your peers, you should be able to tell the interviewer with confidence that you possess those traits, as well. This question is one that interviewers often use to distinguish sincerity on the part of the candidate.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "Confidence is one thing I think is important. It's hard to believe in someone who doesn't believe in themselves. I believe if a patient is comfortable with a provider's ability to perform it will make following a plan of care easier."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I believe healthcare professionals must have a passion for medicine and dedication to and empathy for their patients. I also believe they must be honest with patients to build strong relationships."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      This is a strong start! You do well to identify the qualities you feel are important to perform this type of work. To strengthen this response, provide the interviewer with examples of how you will demonstrate each of these characteristics in the role and how they contribute to your success.

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  • Compatibility

    9. Are you open to working on rotation or split shift schedules, if required for this position?

      How to Answer

      Being flexible with the schedule you are willing to work is always a plus. However, many people work more than one job or have a one-parent home which requires them to have a flexible schedule. Others simply prefer to work one shift rather than another. Being upfront with the interviewer about what schedule suits your preference could help prevent conflict later on. It is easier to plan a schedule you can agree on than it is to fix problems that arise due to fear of being rejected. Be honest and direct.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I am open to working any schedule where I am needed. I am very excited to become a part of an organization and become established."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Diligence

    10. How do you keep up with changes in medicine or trends related to healthcare?

      How to Answer

      Medicine is a continuously changing field where new technology and processes are developed and introduced on a regular basis. Those that remain stagnant in their knowledge fall behind very quickly. For this question, the interviewer is looking for you to have a passion for continuous learning in your field. Talk about any continuing education you have pursued or any journals/publications that you subscribe to and/or read.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I read the New England Journal of Medicine to remain up to date."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Excellent! This is a trustworthy source. Have you learned anything interesting lately? This question presents a wonderful opportunity to start a meaningful conversation with your interviewer.

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  • Direct

    11. Knowing what you know now, what would you say to someone who is considering pursuing a career in medicine?

      How to Answer

      The old saying 'Hindsight is 20/20' is something many people say is true. This question gives you an opportunity to show how you have grown and what kind of wisdom you may pass on to someone who is coming into this career after you. A word of caution: This is not the time to say 'Run for the hills!' Be positive!

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I would have to say, 'If you feel like you want to specialize in one area and then change your mind, go with it. We all have that special calling in our life. We just have to listen for it.'"

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "If it is something that you love, go for it! I think students need to have determination, a passion for medicine, a sense of how to care for people combine with the knowledge that makes you a good doctor."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      This is good advice! I like that you include the ideal characteristics to succeed in medicine.

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  • Direct

    12. In your opinion, what are some of the biggest problems in healthcare today?

      How to Answer

      As a physician, you have spent a great deal of time studying and perfecting your skill. Your opinion is valuable and the interviewer is giving you a chance to voice it. No matter what your answer, remember to be respectful.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "One of the biggest problems, in my opinion, is that we don't always get to spend as much time with our patients as we like. That's not to say that we rush in and out of a room, but there was a time when it seemed like we could spend a little extra time with patients and get to know them. This means a lot when we are trying to build a solid relationship with people who are looking for a family doctor."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "There may be more, but I will talk about two main problems. Medicine should focus more on prevention than on treatment. For example, if people try to have a healthy diet and exercise every day, they will be able to control their body weight and control other diseases related to obesity. A second issue is that some people are skeptical about COVID-19 vaccines. If more information is available about the vaccine, then we can change people's perceptions."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Prevention is a vital topic, as is hesitation around vaccines. These are excellent points to make, and this answer will show the interviewer that you have a strong sense of current concerns in the healthcare industry.

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  • Direct

    13. What is a common misconception that people have about family practitioners?

      How to Answer

      Not everyone has a clear understanding of what physicians in different specialties do. They may understand a medical term, such as cardio refers to the heart, or know that a family physician can see any age range of patients, but they don't necessarily understand how in-depth each specialty's care can be.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I think there are a number of misconceptions about physicians, in general. One of the most common misconceptions is that we are money-driven rather than care-driven. While you can find people who are more focused on earning potential than anything, physicians really do have a heart for our patients. Going to medical school and through residency programs is very difficult. It takes a great deal of dedication and drive to be able to accomplish the goal of being a doctor. Caring is at our heart."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Discovery

    14. What scares you most about being a physician?

      How to Answer

      We all have things that make us feel uncomfortable or that nagging thought in the back of our minds that makes us question things from time to time. Being a physician is a great responsibility: responsibility to patients, peers, subordinates, and to self. This is not a trick question or a way for the interviewer to find something negative about you. Rather, this is an opportunity for you to show the 'human side' of you. Don't be embarrassed about having something that makes you uncomfortable. Just be sure when you give an example, you find a reason that that fear makes you a better doctor.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "One thing that scares me is having to face the reality that I can't 'save them all.' I know that may sound silly, but when we go to medical school, I think all of us have this idea that we are going to be the ones to save as many people as possible. Of course, that's not ever a reality, but it doesn't mean that we don't want to give it all we've got."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Sometimes, small details can make a difference in diagnosis or treatment, for example, not knowing what medications this patient is taking."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      This is a significant responsibility, indeed! Rather than leaving your answer on this point, be sure to make the connection as to why this fear makes you a better physician. You can also explain the action steps that you take to overcome this fear.

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  • Discovery

    15. Tell me one thing about yourself that most people would not know.

      How to Answer

      Every interview question is not focused on the job title or qualifications only. An interviewer wants to get to know the person sitting in the chair across from him. There is more to you than a medical license and the interviewer appreciates that.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "Most people don't know that I am an avid bowler. I actually joined a bowling league my freshman year of college and have been bowling ever since. It is a great way to be involved with friends and it's good exercise, too."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Discovery

    16. What is something you experienced in medical school that you will always remember?

      How to Answer

      Medical school is long and hard. No one doubts that. It is the place where you learn many difficult lessons and life skills to help you become a good physician. When you can work through an experience and take something from it that will help you down the road, that shows true maturity and an ability to glean from instruction.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I learned that I am not nearly as smart as I thought I was. I learned that being a doctor means growing and learning every day if I want to be successful and be the kind of physician my patients want and need."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Discovery

    17. What makes being a family practitioner so special to you?

      How to Answer

      Being a physician means you are involved in the lives of many people. While there may be instances when an outcome is not the positive one you may have hoped for, there are also times that things do go well, or something that happens that leaves you feeling fulfilled by your job. Interviewers like to know the things that make you feel happy or well-accomplished in your job.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "Being a family practitioner is a great opportunity. I don't know if I could choose one thing that alone makes being a family physician special. I like the feeling of being able to work in a family atmosphere that I get being a general practitioner."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Family medicine is special because it is very challenging. The challenges include working with different age groups and different stages of disease (acute and chronic). It presents a good opportunity to use all of my previous experience."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Good start! I recommend that you expand on your thought regarding combining your previous experience and your work as a family physician.

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  • Diversity

    18. What experience do you have working with peers from diverse background?

      How to Answer

      In an industry as large as healthcare, diversity among peers is inevitable. To be successful, it is crucial to learn how to work with a diverse group of people. Some people are intimidated when faced with learning new cultures and beliefs, but in the healthcare industry, it is crucial to provide effective care. The interviewer wants to know that you are open to meeting and learning about new people and becoming an integral part of the team. Be positive with your response.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "The largest diverse group I worked with was probably when I did my clinical rotation at University Medical Center. I was afforded the opportunity to meet people from different cultures, religions, and professional backgrounds. It gave me an eye-opening experience of how many wonderful people there are!"

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "When I came to the United States, I worked as a busser in a restaurant which gave me a chance to get to know people from different backgrounds. I met people from Iraq, Morocco, Egypt, and Lybia. I was curious to know more about their culture and how they adapted to a new lifestyle."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      This is an interesting bit of information - thank you for sharing :) Next, be sure to include how this exposure to diverse environments will help you succeed as a family physician. The idea is to connect the 'then and now' in your response.

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  • Leadership

    19. Are you comfortable speaking to large groups of people?

      How to Answer

      While you may not be asked to give presentations to large groups of people, there may be an opportunity to speak at seminars. Also, being comfortable with large groups or speaking could give you an opportunity to lecture or mentor others.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I believe I would be comfortable speaking to large groups. I have not spoken to large groups professionally, but I would enjoy the opportunity."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "Sometimes I feel a little bit anxious, but only for the first couple of minutes."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      That's normal, and many people feel this way when speaking to large groups :) The key to this question will be to assure the interviewer that you have a method or technique to make yourself more comfortable or have an action plan to grow this skill.

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  • Leadership

    20. Are you comfortable with the idea of precepting medical interns?

      How to Answer

      While you may not be required to train residents during their internship, some facilities do have that option. If you are comfortable, that's great. If you are not, don't be afraid to tell the interviewer. Not everyone wants to take on an educator role. It is better to be upfront now, rather than having to do something that makes you feel uncomfortable later.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I think being able to precept interns is a great opportunity. I must admit, at this point in my career, I would like to gain a little more independent experience before I jumped right into the educator role. However, I am certainly interested in having the chance when I am able to become a little more experienced."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Management

    21. How would your subordinates describe you?

      How to Answer

      Having a good working relationship with peers is critical to any good partnership or team. Knowing how to communicate with those who report to you is very important. The interviewer is looking for cues from you that you are capable of establishing a good working relationship with those for whom you have charge.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "Being a new physician, I do not have a whole wealth of experience in a supervisory position. However, the experience I do have, I think would show that I am easy to get along with and always willing to help make the burden of work lighter for others as much as possible."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Management

    22. Have you ever been responsible for hiring new employees? If so, what qualities did you look for in a candidate, and do you feel like you possess those qualities?

      How to Answer

      There is more than one reason for asking this question. First, the interviewer wants to know what qualities you think are important to perform this job. Second, and most importantly, your answer will tell the interviewer if you hold yourself to the same standard as you do others. If you want to see certain characteristics in your peers, you should be able to tell the interviewer with confidence that you possess those traits, as well. This question is one that interviewers often use to distinguish sincerity on the part of the candidate.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "If I were hiring someone, I would look for someone who is passionate about the job and about patient care. I also feel that being approachable and willing to learn is very important. An interview does not allow a great deal of time to get to know someone, so an interviewer has to lean on instinct and experience."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I have not been in that position, but if I ever find myself in that position, I would look for a person who is curious to learn new things and is able to work with a team."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      These are certainly important skills to look for. Hiring the right people will be essential if you are ever in the position of owning or running a clinic. To dive deeper into these thoughts - what indicators would tell you that someone is curious to learn or is a positive team player?

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  • Scenario Based

    23. Has there ever been a time when you had to notify a patient of a missed diagnosis or an inaccurate result that was given to you?

      How to Answer

      While healthcare providers strive for accuracy and thorough care, no one is above making a mistake. The interviewer understands that. The important thing is being willing to address a mistake with professionalism and proper follow-through. That is what the interviewer wants to see in your answer.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I haven't been faced with an experience like this yet in my career, and I am very thankful to say so. I do always try to double-check results, especially if they are indicative of an abnormality or poor prognosis before notifying a patient in hopes of preventing an episode like this."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Situational

    24. Tell me a problem with a patient where you may have been misinformed about the patient's symptoms and had to re-evaluate a care plan or a time that a patient was afraid of treatment and had to be educated further before following through with care.

      How to Answer

      As a medical professional working with patients, you research problems on a daily basis. Tell the interviewer about a particular situation, how you researched the problem and what the outcome was. Tell the interviewer about a time that a patient came back to you because his symptoms weren't being relieved or the time that you discovered the patient was not taking his medications as prescribed.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "One incident I can recall was an elderly woman who came into the clinic with repeated urinary tract infections. She was given prescriptions for the infection and taught the proper use of the medications and given instructions on ways to prevent the infection. Still, every time she came back for a follow-up appointment, she had symptoms. After counseling with her and asking about her behavior patterns at home, we discovered she took daily baths with bath salts and perfumed soaps. She was educated on the ways that those things could irritate the urinary tract and could lead to infection. When she returned for her next follow-up, she was symptom-free."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Stress

    25. Being a physician can be very stressful. What are some things that you do to promote a healthy balance between work and your personal life?

      How to Answer

      Being able to balance your hectic work schedule with your personal responsibilities and goals is often difficult. Psychologists today say that having a healthy work/life balance is crucial to help prevent becoming too stressed which could result in physical complications. The interviewer wants to know that you identify with the need for having a healthy life balance.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I really enjoy being outdoors. Anything that has to do with bicycling or hiking is something I could do every day. When I'm off work, I like to spend some time each week in the outdoors. It's a good exercise which helps reduce stress and anxiety and helps promote good heart health, as well."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Stress

    26. Being a family practice physician requires great attention to detail and often multi-tasking. How do you keep yourself from becoming overwhelmed?

      How to Answer

      Managing the care of several patients requires the ability to multi-task and ensure all details are checked and double-checked. In a physician interview, discuss your understanding of the importance of maintaining detailed records, performing multiple assessments, and handling medications and procedures efficiently and accurately. While physicians may not have to do all of these activities personally, it is still the physician's responsibility to make sure that correct orders are given and that a clinic or unit is run correctly.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I have learned to recognize the things that may cause me to feel overwhelmed and try to address them before a situation gets out of hand. For example, I always like to make sure that I have reviewed and signed off on all of the verbal orders I had authorized. I also like to get reports on any patients I may be seeing so that I know what was going on with them before my arrival. This keeps things from piling up and leaving me to feel overwhelmed later on."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I try to work with the nurse and try to have a mental checklist for the things I need to do first. Also, I try to make short notes about the patients (i.e., things they need to do, treatment plan) and at the end of the day, I can go back to my notes and reformulate based on my notes."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Chad Wilson

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Chad Wilson Reviewed the Above Answer

      The practice of writing short notes at the end of the day to keep yourself organized is an excellent habit to have as a family physician. I also like that you mention keeping a mental checklist of the day's tasks to work through. Nice job! I suggest replacing the word "try" in your response, as it implies failure. I have provided a suggested revision in the 'Professional Answer' section below.

      "I work closely with the nursing staff to delegate tasks, and I keep a mental checklist for the things I need to do first. These actions keep things from piling up and leaving me to feel overwhelmed later. Also, I am in the habit of writing short notes about the patients (things they need to do, treatment plans, etc.) at the end of the day. This enables me to go back to my notes and reformulate as needed, based on my previous assessment."

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  • Stress

    27. Many physicians report experiencing 'burn out' at some point in their careers. What do you do to help prevent this in your life?

      How to Answer

      Being a healthcare provider is a great responsibility. Unfortunately, because of the great responsibility, many providers do report experiencing the need to take a break. The interviewer wants to know that you are capable of handling stress and that you know when to ask for help.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I had a great mentor when I was in medical school. She told me if I didn't remember anything else she told me, that I should always remember to take care of myself. I have grown to understand what she meant. If we are bogged down physically and emotionally, it is easy to become overwhelmed and experience feeling burned out."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Stress

    28. As a physician, you will often have to deliver discouraging news to patients and their families. How do you handle such hard situations?

      How to Answer

      Delivering discouraging news can be difficult for any healthcare provider. The interviewer is not expecting you to react as though you are resilient to all difficult situations. Rather, he wants to know that you can get the job done while being compassionate.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I always try to schedule enough time to spend with the patient and family so that they can talk to one another and with me. Helping them process the news is often a way for me to cope, as well."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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  • Tough

    29. What makes you think you are a good family physician?

      How to Answer

      This is a chance for you to 'sell yourself' to the interviewer. Share what you think sets you apart from other physicians who may be applying. Remember, be positive. Make sure to mention some of your personal qualities, such as compassion, rather than only your hard skills.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I am passionate about being a great physician and doing all I can to make a difference in the lives of my patients. I am a hard worker and believe in teamwork. I believe I could be an asset to the team of providers you have here."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      User-Submitted Answer

      "I believe my previous experience as a family doctor and in preventive medicine, my dedication, communication skills, and ability to work in a team would all make me a good family physician."

      Written by an Anonymous User

      Rachelle Enns

      Our Professional Interview Coach
      Rachelle Enns Reviewed the Above Answer

      Awesome start - you sound very confident! Now, I suggest taking your answer from simply telling to showing AND telling. I have provided a starter for you below.

      "I possess four main qualities make me a good family physician. First, I have valuable experience as a family doctor with a focus on preventive medicine. My background includes...(provide a brief overview of your experience and offer a couple of stand-out accomplishments that prove your success as a family doctor. Second, my dedication to my patients is unmatched. I...(give a measurable example that highlights your dedication). I have strong communication skills, which I have shown in many situations such as when...(give another measurable example of a time when your communication skills made a difference). Last, I enjoy working in a team setting. Previously, I...(talk bout a time when your teamwork skills made a difference in the workplace)."

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  • Trust

    30. One of the most important things physicians have to pay attention to is patient confidentiality. Tell me about a time you were trusted with confidential information.

      How to Answer

      Working within the medical career field you are trusted with sensitive information each day. Don't fall into this trap and answer this question with a story containing confidential information, people will view your answer negatively and view you as not being trustworthy. If you choose to tell about a situation be sure to be vague and not use names or too many details.

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

      Entry Level

      "I am expected to keep all information confidential every day, so there is not just one instance that I can refer to. I believe in practicing within legal and ethical bounds and keeping patient's confidence is one way I do that."

      Written by Darby Faubion on August 31st, 2021

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