Speech Pathology
Top 25 Interview Questions and Answers

Question 1 of 25

1. Describe to me your best therapy session?
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1. Describe to me your best therapy session?
Best Answer
When the client is engaged and motivated and is showing progress.
2.
I enjoy seeing the progress that students/patient make in improving their communication.
3.
While doing an internship I was treating a man with aphasia, he had a girlfriend and wanted to be able to send her appropriate text messages because he had word finding difficulties, we began practicing with messages and appropriate phrases and after a few sessions he and I shared a conversations through text.
4.
When I participated in an intensive aphasia program and the client was very low level with her communication. She would get very frustrated with herself and upset when she was unable to respond correctly or express herself. One session, I gave her a pep talk and encouragement and she even came in with a better attitude and we had the best session we had throughout the program. She made so much progress and you could just see the excitement and happiness she possessed due to the success.
5.
Where the child is happy, engaged, and is making progress on his goals.
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2. Why did you decide to become a Speech and Language pathologist?
Top Answer
Because I wanted to make a difference in the lives of the children and adults with whom I have worked.
Second Best
I became a Speech and Language Pathologist so that through my lifetime of working to provide for myself and my family, I may also help others. I was blessed with a natural disposition to work harmoniously with others, as well as, empathetic to people with disabilities. As a teenager I was drawn to babysitting because I loved being around young children. It was rewarding to create a safe and fun environment for them. As a college student I realized I had a passion for health and learning about the human brain and body. My Dad had been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis when I was a child which definitely played a role in my choice to become an SLP. The combination of wanting to work with children, help others who were sick or disabled, natural tendency to love socializing and communicating with those around me, made the decision of which profession to pursue easy. I have never regretted my choice.
3.
I was exposed to it as my brother was thought to have apraxia of speech, he was virtually non-verbal until 4yrs. Through speech pathology my brother came to communicate which reduced his frustration. Also, my two passions in life are communication (relationships) and eating! If I can help someone do either of these two things I feel that helps achieve quality of life, and makes all the hard work worth it.
4.
My younger cousin was diagnose with autism at a young age. I been came more interested in the field and I enjoy helping other overcome obstacles and reach their highest potential.
5.
Frankly speaking 15 years ago when I was high school student, my mother injured in accident, after that she went to speech therapy clinic, so I decide to become speech therapist to help patient with any speech and language disorders.
6.
When growing up I thought I wanted to be a teacher so I volunteered in a classroom my senior year of high school. When I went to my community college I took 2 years of ASL and that really interested me. I also was a nanny for a boy that had speech disorder and throughout the time I nannied for him I was able to notice how much more confident he was in speaking. I knew that I wanted to work with children and I decided after that speech therapy was something I was interested in as communication is such an important aspect in life. I want to be able to help those who are less fortunate in that area and be able to be confident with themselves and it seems so rewarding.
7.
My nephew has cerebral palsy and my father inlaw had a stroke. They both inspired me to want to learn more.
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3. Describe the special education referral process.
Top Answer
Depends on the workplace's policies and procedures regarding special education referrals.
Second Best
Child is referred. speech assesses.
3.
The special ed referral process entails observing, testing,and trial and error of workable techniques.
4.
It depends on the schoold current policies and procedures that they currently have in place.
5.
I think it depends on the schools policies and procedures, but I think the child is evaluated and then referred for a speech evaluation if necessary.
6.
A child is referred, Then we access their speech and language.
7.
Depends on the state qualifications and eligibility requirements. Typically a student is referred for evaluation, and the SLP assesses speech/language and/or articulation as needed.
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4. Would your friends or family, say you have a good patience?
Best Answer
Yes, I have a lot of patience which I developed through years of working with young children.
2.
Most definitely. They know I am very positive and patient, giving my clients the full time to feel comfortable and make progress.
3.
Yes, I am patient and willing to try new ways/modify techniques to maximize success.
4.
They would say that I have very good patience. You need to have good patience in this field. Often times you do not see sudden progress.
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5. What excites you the most about speech therapy?
Top Answer
Seeing my patients improve their relationships and quality of life.
Second Best
Seeing people improve their ability to speak and comprehend. Seeing advancements within someone is extremely exciting, knowing that they made changes based on their own efforts.
3.
The ability to interact closely with another person to help them achieve their maximum potential.
4.
That it is always changing and always challenging. No two clients or clients situations are alike, therefore everyday is different. I am always learning new things and finding better ways to do something or explain something. And it's just so rewarding. The smallest gain in someone's communication or swallowing can mean so much to them. To be able to help people achieve quality of life is an amazing feeling.
5.
Seeing the smallest gain can be thrilling. Seeing kids grow and make progress is wonderful to experience. Also, no two speech sessions are the same.
6.
What excites me most about speech therapy is that it's always something new! Yes, you may have 3 children all working on the sound /r/, but each one has a different personality, different ways of producing it, and therefore need different therapy techniques!
7.
The ever changing nature of the field. Having a patient/client become a more successful communicator.
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6. Have you helped a patient/student before? How rewarding was that for you?
Best Answer
Yes, it was very rewarding to see them improve their relationships with others through improved communication skills.
2.
Yes, I have helped a patient learn to take train from home to downtown.
3.
I have had success with many patients/students in my several years as a SLP. I remember one patient in particular that used very few words and was very intelligible, as we worked through threapy he became more intelligible during each session. He began talking with people in the waiting room and soon was ready to be ischarged from services. It was a very rewarding experieince for both of us.
4.
Yes, I helped a 5th grader see the value in accomplishing his communication goals in articulation. It was very rewarding.
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7. What are your experiences using oral motor approach to improve speech clarity?
Top Answer
Mixed success using this method. I find it can be really useful for patients in increasing overall awareness of their oral structures and articulatory positions during speech in those who are dyspraxic or dysarthric. This can increase speech intelligibility. I have found that functional speech tasks have proven more successful in speech intelligibility gains, also patients often prefer functional 'relevant' exercises.
Second Best
Oral motor exercsies are useful in inproving the strength and rangae of motion of intra oral structures for both swallowing and speech fumctions in patients post stroke , specifically those who are diagnosed with dysarthria and apraxia. Also I found them hepful in head and neck nancer patients. Clinical based literature revealed therapeutic value of using such excercsies in increasing speech intelligibility.
3.
People who have dysarthria require exercises in placment and velocity to improve speech. Working on strength would not help improve speech. I have worked on this w/ people before and I will have them work on the phonemes in syllables and words to make the movement more functional.
4.
I have experience using oral motor exercises to improve speech intelligibility. My results have been mixed. In some clients it made no difference in their intelligibility. In others, it worked.
5.
I have experienced mixed results. For some clients it provides awareness of their articulators and their positioning during speech. Some clients however find this approach uncomfortable.
6.
I use a variety of oral motor exercises as well as tools such as whistles to increase strength in the oral motor muscles.
7.
There is lots of debates around whether this actually works, no evidence.
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8. Talk to me about the controversies surrounding non-speech oral exercises?
Top Answer
currently there is a lack of evidence base surrounding the use of oromotor excercises to aid speech production, though there is evidence to support their use in chewing therapy and anecdotally some slts feel oromotor activities have resulted in improvements in speech intelligibility
Second Best
I am not familar with this so I can not speak to it.
3.
- There is no concrete scientific evidence to suggest that non-speech oral exercises provide any benefit to patients/clients with speech difficulties. - Whilst the patient/client may be able to achieve the non-speech oral exercise, they may be unable to transfer and generalise this skill to a speech sound. - Others believe that for a client who finds speech exercises too difficult, non-speech oral exercises are an appropriate beginning exercise.
4.
The evidence says that if you are doing OM exercises to improve bolus formation or swallow that the movement really needs to mimic the movment you would need them to do for example if you need them to be able to perform a lingual sweep then you would work on ROM and coordination. The exercises need to be intense to show any functional carryover. The jury still seems to be out though.
5.
EBP does not support it. It is not speech based, it is muscular based and many studies show there is minimal muscle strength needed for speech.
6.
Current research states that oral motor exercises are not effective for treatment.
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9. Do you prefer working with children or adults?
Top Answer
They are both so different, and I guess that is the best ting about being able to work with both. With children, it's amazing to know that the changes you can instill now can affect them in a positive way for the rest of their lives. With adults, it's really interesting to learn about the lives they have already lead and to use those experiences to learn the skills they need.
Second Best
I prefer to work with children, but I am very open to working with adults, and think more experience with them would be very beneficial.
3.
I would perfer to work with adults because I feel that children can be pronouncing words a certain way because they aren't grown up yet.
4.
It really doesn't matter.
5.
Children, but I am very open to working with adults.
6.
I like working with both. I have had a lot of exposure with children. However, I would love to see the adult side of things more.
7.
I enjoy working with both children and adults. I have had positive experiences with both age groups. At this time I would prefer to work with adults because I highly enjoy watching their progress after a stroke, brain injury, or when having swallowing difficulties.
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10. Tell me about your undergraduate education?
Best Answer
I attended Western Michigan University. I was admitted into the undergraduate program and during that time I also had a client for one semester, where I worked with him and filled out paperwork and client reports. I have also been involved in other clubs and activities such as NSSHLA, nursing home, volunteering in the classroom.
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11. What are your research interests?
Best Answer
I am interested in oral motor therapy and staying current in therapy techniques.
2.
According to my experience I should say that after any assessment of my patient I will research for new approaches and methods in assessment and treatment, like stuttering, aphasia.
3.
As a school-based Speech Pathologist, I am interested in a variety of topics.
4.
I am interested in fluency and the nuances of treatment for it. I am also interested in PD and the research I did on increasing approaches to increase intensity in PD patients.
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12. Describe how you currently work or communicate with caregivers?
Best Answer
I allow my supervising SLP to do most of the formal communication other than general info and info such as what we did in the session.
2.
I feel it is very important to consider the cultural background while communicating with the caregivers. It is also very important to listen to their concerns and needs. My priority is to explain the pertaining details with patience and listen to their response. It is important to make decisions that involve caregivers and satisfy their concerns to the maximum.
3.
We have several ways. I communicate via email, parent/teacher conferences, homework sent home and IEPs. These avenues help communicate day to day activities along with the the overall goals.
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13. What speech therapy method do you practice the most?
Best Answer
Individual therapy.
2.
Small group therapy, integrating the individual goals.
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14. What experience do you have working with language disorders?
Top Answer
Clinical only.
Second Best
I have worked with students with language disorders for 18 years.
3.
I have worked with children with delayed language to help develop vocab and age appropriate length of sentences, and with children with autism and other special needs.
4.
I've worked in paediatric outpatient clinic where we see clients with language disorders. Following detailed assessment with something like the celf we then provide individual and group therapy where we find the key is to find a good language model, ie a parent and train them to be an example and to give lots of positive opportunities to practice, as well as how to give constructive and positive feedback to the child.
5.
I have worked with both pediatric and adult language disorders from expressive/receptive language deficits, aphasia, apraxia, and cognitive disorders for 18 years within a variety of settings.
6.
During my internship I worked with individuals with word finding difficulties, expressive and receptive aphasia.
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15. What are your experiences working with cognitive disabilities?
Best Answer
I worked three years in LTF that include geriatric patients with cognitive linguistic deficits. Patients with dementia and language deficits composed a large percentage of our coaseload. Also patients post MVA / TBI usually exhibite deficits in memory, excutive functions and attention.
2.
3 years experience in rehab and acute settings assessing diagnosing and providing inter-d management of cognitie deficits. Patients presenting with progressive neuro deficits, including dementia, also post stroke, MVA's TBI's. Run both individual and group therapy to reduce impairments, provide education and give compensation strategies to the client and families. Expereince with neglect/inattention, memory, attention, and executive deficits.
3.
I have experience working with cognitive disabilities during my practicum in aphasia. I currently work with children and do not have the opportunity.
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16. What kind of help do you need to do your best work?
Top Answer
I like to use a transdisciplinary approach to help my students to reach their full potential. To do this, I would need good communication with the family, teacher, ot, pt and other professionals working with the student.
Second Best
Space to work.
3.
I need collaboration and support from my supervising slp.
4.
I need collaboration and support from my supervising slp.
5.
I need collaboration and support from my supervising slp.
6.
A positive, respectful and trustworthy environment.
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17. What are your experiences working with articulation?
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18. Describe any clinical experience you have had in undergrad.
Best Answer
In undergrad, we were given the opportunity to work with a client in the aushc. This allowed me to add clinic experience to my classroom knowledge and really enhance my initial experience with speech therapy.
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19. Describe to me your graduate education?
Best Answer
I attended _____ university which has a rural focus, with an aim to retain country people in country jobs. It equips us to specifically deal with issues around indigenous health, and difficulties in providing health education, assessment and therapy to regional and remote areas. It also looked at alternative methods to achieve this, like training people within the community and telehealth, and different models of service provision.
2.
I have an AA degree in slpa, and completed two slpa internships, one school based, one clinically based with severe population.
3.
I received an education based on the ideas of theory and how each mechanism, being voice/swallowing mechanisms or cognition, functions properly and what it looks like to have a disorder. We also focused on assessment and therapy procedures. Keeping up with the best and current evidence based practice was emphasized at each level. We also received intense therapy training with patients ranging 18 months to 90 years focusing primarily on speech, language, and cognition.
4.
My graduate education has been intensive. I began working in the clinic the second week of classes. Each semester I worked with one adult and one child with very different communication difficulties.
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20. Are you okay working the same career for 30 years?
Best Answer
Yes, as long as I am helping others and continuing my own learning.
2.
Yes, being a speech pathologist for 30 years is something I plan to do. Unlike doing the same mundane duties as in another career, I believe that I will be working with a variety of different clients, helping them better their lives.
3.
Absolutely. I want to see the kids I work with improve in overall communication.
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21. Speech therapy can cost your patient a lot of money, do you worry about the cost for the patient when doing your job?
Best Answer
No,definitely not.
2.
No, I hope to work in the government sector, where patients do not have to pay for speech pathology services.
3.
Actually I will chose the best for my patient, for patents who could not pay our sessions fee I could implement some strategies to cowork whit them.
4.
I sympathize with the patient regarding the cost. However, I am aware that the therapy will assist them to reach their full potential and would not be available without the cost.
5.
Yes, the cost is important for the patient. If the patient cannot afford speech therapy and decide not to go, it can really hurt the child and their speech production and progress. They may not get the needs necessary.
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22. What are your thoughts about inclusion and pull outs as therapy models?
Top Answer
I think it is the least restrictive method and I think it works best unless there are extreme limitations.
Second Best
I think it is the least restrictive method and I think it works best unless there are extreme limitations.
3.
I think it is the least restrictive method and I think it works best unless there are extreme limitations.
4.
I think both models can be very successful if done correctly.
5.
I believe it depends on the student and whether or not direct intervention needs to occur to make progress.
6.
My thoughts are that I believe as long as a child can learn within the classroom and the SLPA can push in therapy that is the best environment. However, I support the idea that some children really need that one on one session within the speech room.
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23. Do you like to work in teams or are you an individual achiever?
Best Answer
I enjoy working in teams and learning from other professionals.
2.
Both, I am self motivated and have alot of initiative, but I like to collaborate with other slaps and slps.
3.
I enjoy working with a team in an multidisciplinary approach but also work well as an individual SLP with my own caseload.
4.
Although I am a self-starter, I definitely work well with teams. I like collaboration and make a point to communicate with teachers and the rest of the team often to review progress.
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24. What excercise do you encourage the most for NS-OME?
Best Answer
I rarely do non-speech oral motor exercises. I would recommend some talk tools for jaw stability.
2.
Tongue exercises if it is with articulation like the sound /r/. Have the train the tongue to move in different directions.
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25. Why are you the best candidate for us?
Best Answer
I bring the diversity to the field also I am able to help students that speaks spanish and also I am aware of diffrent cultures.
2.
I am not new working with children, I think you will find from my resume that I have many years of experience working with children and working in schools to hone my skills in helping, connecting and motivating students. As a male, I think I bring a unique perspective to helping kids that may be otherwise difficult to motivate.
3.
Because I have over 25 years of working in speech therapy and I work well with children and staff.
4.
Because I have over 25 years of working in speech therapy and I work well with children and staff.
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Speech Pathology
Job Satisfaction
Interview Difficulty
Healthcare
Vacation
Hours per Week
95%
Easy
Provided
Three Weeks
47 Hrs/Wk

Human communication includes speech (articulation, intonation, rate, intensity, voice, resonance, fluency), language (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics), both receptive and expressive language (including reading and writing)[1], and non-verbal communication such as facial expression, posture and gesture. Swallowing problems managed under speech therapy are problems in the oral and pharyngeal stages and sometimes esophageal stages of swallowing.


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wik...
Last Updated: December 19, 2014, 6:39 pm
Education Requirements

Speech-language pathologists typically need at least a masterís degree. They must be licensed in most states; requirements vary by state.

Work Environment

Most speech-language pathologists work full time.

Speech Pathology Reviews

Jun 19, 2014
Why did you choose this profession?
A cousin of mine introduced me to this profession. I fell in love with it as I realized how fulfilling, worthwhile and noble this profession is as it helps others improve their communication as well as relations with others around them.
What do you enjoy about being a Speech Pathology?
I enjoy seeing my clients improving their communication. We provide them with the tools, and it is exciting to see how they achieve the goals using the strategies and tools.
What areas do you dislike about being a Speech Pathology?
I have not yet come across any area that I dislike.
What special skills does it take to be a Speech Pathology?
I am positive and patient. I am creative and passionate and I am a team player.
What do you find to be the most challenging part of your job?
Scheduling the students while making sure that the speech session do not interfere the core academics.
Tell me about the hours you are used to working and your schedule.
I work from 7:30 to 4:00. I start at 7:30 a. M. And start seeing students at 8:30. During the day my schedule consists of;group speech therapy, in class observations, assessment and IEP meetings.
What are some of the benefits you are custom to as a Speech Pathology?
Team collaboration and a healthy work environment.
What are some of your most memorable experiences as a Speech Pathology?
When during a social group one of my student spontanoeosly advised the other student that it is so boring when one person keeps on talking.I felt that I was successful in providing an opportunity to generalize what she learned during therapy sessions.
What do you wish you knew starting out in your profession that you know now?
To get a lot of hands on experience by volunteering as it helps understand what we read in books.
What advancements do you expect in the future?
More opportunities for clients with special needs and learning disabilities to be understood by other students with help of more and more efforts to bring an awareness of speech needs to general school population.
How often did you work in teams as a Speech Pathology?
Mostly to plan an IEP meeting and occasionally to discuss a student referred by parents and or teachers.
What types of customer engagement have you experienced?
Yes, I had to meet parents in person and or answer concerns via phone calls. I was always a great experience to provide parents and families with suggestions and or strategies. It is important to hear concerns and try to satisfy the clients by providing mutually agreeable solutions.
What type of stressful, high pressure situations, have you experienced?
I received often received back to back preschool assessments that required extra time to observe at the preschool and complete formal assessments. I would not call it stressful, however, it required better time management on my part. I was always able to manage it well.
If you had to start over, what career would you choose instead of being a Speech Pathology?
I am enjoying the profession of speech pathology. I only wish I had come across this profession a little earlier in life.
Jul 29, 2014
What do you enjoy about being a Speech Pathology?
I enjoy all the different areas that speech addresses. You might work on 10 different skills in one day!
What areas do you dislike about being a Speech Pathology?
I dislike the paperwork but documentation is an important part of speech.
What special skills does it take to be a Speech Pathology?
I am organized , flexible and creative. I think those three skills combined compliment my work because you have to be organized to keep all the data, you need to be flexible just in case the client is not participating in therapy like they should and creative to come up with all the different activities to keep children engaged and interested in what they are learning.
What do you find to be the most challenging part of your job?
The most challenging part of my job is building a rapport with teenagers who might be defiant. It takes a lot of patience, caring, and time to build trust. You have to find the right combination of things to help a child let down their barriers and participate.
Aug 10, 2014
Why did you choose this profession?
According to my interests and motivations I choose this.
What do you enjoy about being a Speech Pathology?
As a pro-clinician I could justify the fact that help to people is my life target.
Aug 12, 2014
Why did you choose this profession?
Desire to help others live better, more fulfilling lives and a great respect for the value of communication between human beings.
What do you enjoy about being a Speech Pathology?
The continually changing and challenging field of Speech and Language Pathology which supports my cognitive health and desire to learn, diverse settings and populations to work within, and the goal of my work being that of helping others achieve their goals and improve their quality of living.
What areas do you dislike about being a Speech Pathology?
Constantly increasing amount of time necessary for the documentation/paperwork required to provide SLP services.
What special skills does it take to be a Speech Pathology?
Empathy, compassion, patience, self-discipline, and emotional intelligence.
Aug 14, 2014
Why did you choose this profession?
There is such a variety of job opportunities and always a need. You can work in the private practice, school, or hospital with all ages. You can work individually or in groups with therapy and the results are so rewarding.
What do you enjoy about being a Speech Pathology?
Helping others in being able to communicate effectively.