Careers
Companies
Topics
Get Started
Interview Coach 1:1
Gain the confidence you need by asking our professionals any interview scenario, question, or answer you are unsure about.
Let Us Review Your Answers
Our interviewing professionals will gladly review and revise any answer you send us. Allowing you to craft perfect responses for your next job interview.
Interview Questions by Topic
Interview Questions by Career
Interview Questions by Company

Coach Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by
| Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.

Question 1 of 30

What is the most difficult part of being a coach?

1000s of Interview Questions

Win your next job by practicing from our question bank. We have thousands of questions and answers created by interview experts.

Coach Interview Questions

  1. 1.

    What is the most difficult part of being a coach?

      This question isn't necessarily about any individual team and their challenges, but about a challenge you as a coach face. Coaches are presented with many different challenges whether internal or external. With this question you can keep the answer very surface level by talking about difficulties with parents or teachers; another option is to take the answer deeper into how you feel when players move on. Players get older and eventually graduate, it can be bittersweet when a player moves on and it's okay to express that challenge.

      Another way to approach this question is to talk about direct difficulties as a coach related to playing time, making cuts, or even making calls about benching a player. Either way you approach this question make sure you also bring up how you manage that challenge.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I think the hardest part for me as a coach is watching a player graduate that I have worked with since freshman year. It is amazing to help them grow as an athlete and an individual, it is also bittersweet to watch them move on to other things. Thankfully, many times I have had players come back to visit just to tell me how things are going."

      Cassandra's Answer

      "As a new coach, one of the hardest parts for me has been tryouts. When players are so young it is hard to make those decisions on who to cut from the team and who not to. I have been continuing to reach out to my coaching mentors to help learn to make the best possible decision. I think this will continue to be difficult, but I understand the importance of my decision and don't take it lightly."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Coaching can be difficult when players lack maturity, are un-coachable, and are not willing to learn new things."

      Rachelle's Answer

      This type of attitude would be a challenge to deal with, for sure! When you encounter a situation like this, how do you react or solve the situation? This question is another excellent opportunity to 'show and tell' in your response by offering a story-based example using the STAR framework (Situation, Task, Action, Result).

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "The most difficult part of being a coach is the week of tryouts. It is really hard to tell players that they are not good enough for the team. There are a lot of players that deserve a spot on the team but unfortunately, there is a limited amount of space on the rosters."

      Rachelle's Answer

      This situation would be challenging, indeed. How do you handle this difficult part of being a coach? That info would be a helpful addition to your reply. I've provided an example for you below.

      "The most difficult part of being a coach is the week of tryouts. It is really hard to tell players that they did not make the team. There are a lot of players that deserve a spot on the team. Unfortunately, there is a limited amount of space on the rosters. When I let a student know that they did not make it past tryouts, my approach is...(discuss your approach/how you have the difficult conversation)."

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  2. 2.

    Have you experienced coaching a team who have struggled to perform? How have you resolved the problem?

      The interviewer wants to know more about the different methods you use when the team isn't performing as well as you'd hope. Do you focus more on team drills, individual drills, conditioning? More importantly the interviewer wants to know that you'll be able to problem solve the difficulties that your team is faced with.

      Sometimes players aren't doing well next to each other and they just need to be moved around, sometimes problems are bigger than a simple which. When answering this question you should talk about a time you problem solved an issue with a team.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I had two twin sisters on a team together at one point and they played horribly next to each other because they weren't always focused on the game. I was able to switch the line up around and both players and the team were able to perform better."

      Cassandra's Answer

      "When a team of mine is struggling, I take a step back and look at how each player is doing with the team as a whole. Sometimes it is just a player not understanding where they should be which throws off others players, but sometimes it's something bigger like I'm not explaining something the way they can understand. When looking at a problem I look at it as whole so I know where in the process that something is going wrong."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Yes, I have experience working with a team that has struggled to perform. I've addressed it by talking about the problem immediately after a game. After the discussion, we put it in the past and move on. I may also include some drills in the next practice to help improve on the issue causing the poor performance."

      Rachelle's Answer

      This reply is a good start! Since this question is more behavioral and situational in nature, I recommend telling a specific story that walks the interviewer through the situation, your role in the situation, the action you took, and the measurable result/resolution.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  3. 3.

    What does your bench look like during games?

      Every coach has a different style for how they want their bench to be- some coaches require that everyone is standing during games, others have all their players sit down, as a coach just know your style and be ready to back up your reasoning to the interviewer.

      There is no right or wrong way to answer this question, it is about preference.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "

      Cassandra's Answer

      "For example: "I let my players choose whether or not they are going to sit or stand when they are off the court. My only major rule related to bench time is to make sure you are focused and cheering for your teammates."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I prefer that my players are engaged, focused and supportive of the players in the game and stand and encourage players during substitution and timeouts."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Nice response! You paint a really clear picture with this answer. How do you encourage this behavior in your players?

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "Our bench is full of energy. Players are watching their teammates and cheering them on. They stand up during every substitution to give a high-five to the players leaving the floor. Players are engaged during every time-out and during adjustments, so when they are on the floor, they know what to do."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Terrific! I can picture the bench and all of its activity which means your answer is engaging and memorable. Well done!

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  4. 4.

    How will you handle an irate parent questioning a player's playing time?

      No matter what level of sport you coach there will always be back leash with playing time. It is nearly impossible to create a completely equal set up. It can be tricky at the high school level because parents approach a lot of coaches right after a game about playing time because they are generally not at practice.

      When approaching parents it is important to remain calm and collected or the situation may heighten with feelings of angry. A common solution to dealing with an angry parent is to have a private conversation with the parent and player- this will keep everyone on the same page. It is the preference of the coach whether or not they want to have the conversation with the parent right away or set up a meeting.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "After a game when a parent approaches me that is clearly upset and is concerned about playing time, I generally ask them to set up a meeting with the player and myself for after practice. I like letting after one cool down prior to having the conversations because I believe it makes everyone more level-headed."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Tempers are usually short, especially after a tough loss. I would advise the parents that it would be best to wait 24 hours if they wanted to schedule a meeting with the athletic director of the school, the parent, the player, and myself."

      Rachelle's Answer

      A smart approach by putting some time between the situation - a very good answer! If you have encountered this specific situation in the past, you could also provide a story-based example of a 'time when...' using the STAR framework to form your story (Situation, Task, Action, Result).

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  5. 5.

    How do you know as a coach if you are doing an effective job, what are your measures?

      The interviewer wants to know what drives you as a coach. Think about how the school measures the success of their coaches, your answer may be based on the school's record and their core values for their sports teams- if the school has a strong winning record for the past five years, they will want to hear that you plan to continue that.

      At the end of the day, coaches are more than just their winning or losing track record; coaches improve athletes on and off the court.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "It is a great feeling to end a game with a win, but it is just as great to see my players having fun and giving the game their all. I want my players to be challenged and earn every single point they get. I measure my effectiveness as a coach on how much my players have grown as players during their time with me."

  6. 6.

    If a player openly badmouths your coaching decisions, how will you handle the situation?

      The interviewer wants to know how you handle conflict with players. The interviewer wants to hear about different ways you deal with players and if those ways are appropriate. One of the best ways to handle the situation is to pull the player aside and have a private conversation.

      Depending on the situation you may have to have a team decision, so for this question you may want to pick a situation where you had to deal with this and explain what you did to handle it.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I once had a player who during practice was talking how they didn't think the drill I was running was helpful. I pulled the player aside afterwards to hear their opinion why they thought what they thought- there was a deeper issue that the player was dealing with and we discuss proper ways that she should work on frustrations."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I would pull the player aside and talk to him. This usually happens because of something else going on in the player's life."

      Rachelle's Answer

      You are very right - situations like this are often a result of outside influences. Again, if you have encountered this specific situation in the past, you could also provide a story-based example of a 'time when...' using the STAR framework to form your story (Situation, Task, Action, Result).

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  7. 7.

    Why did you choose to become a coach?

      Each coach has their own reason for doing what they do, it could be because an amazing coach you had or even a horrible one. What ever reason got you to being a coach, be ready to share it. It is very common to be asked during an interview what made you want to become a coach, many times the answer is the help the players, which is 100% okay, but if you can bring a story about why you started it will be much more personal.

      Coaches have many reasons that started their careers, but the players continue to keep coaches going.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "My freshman year I joined volleyball for the first time, I was so nervous and very clumsy. I was still growing into myself while trying to learn this new sport. A few weeks into the season I saw the other players improving while I felt like I was still on week one. The assistant coach saw that I was struggling and sat me down, I expressed my concerns and she explained to me that part of the problem may be that I was too focused on other players. She helped me learn how to focus on my improvement, which really helped me. She took the time to help each player individually and really cared about us. It was the first time I had a coach so individual focused and made me realize one day I wanted to make a positive change in players just like she had."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I love to be around people that share the same love for the game as I do. I love seeing my players developing and scoring goals and watching them finally master a skill that they thought they weren't able to do. It's been a dream of mine and a positive addiction."

      Rachelle's Answer

      This answer is a good start! Do you have a story that you can share, on a more personal note, of what triggered your desire to be a mentor and coach? Perhaps you could also discuss your own sports background as a player.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "I became a basketball coach as a way to give back to the community. I wanted to help young athletes gain confidence, build character, and I wanted to teach them life lessons that prepared them for the next level in life."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Great motivations! The interviewer should appreciate getting to know you on a deeper level. When it comes to giving back to your community and helping young athletes gain confidence - was there a particular event or situation that initially triggered your desire?

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  8. 8.

    How will you generate community interest for the program?

      Most sports at the high school leave need funding to continue to support the team. Many coaches have fundraisers in many different ways to sport their teams- bake sales, car washes, candle drives, and many more. Through these fundraisers you'll need community support for your team or else they won't generally want to support the fundraiser.

      The interviewer wants to know that you'll continue generating sport so that the program will continue and thrive. You can talk about different ways you've reach out to the community on past teams you've coached or on teams you've been on. Be creative and come up with something new to peak the interviewer's interest.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I always have my teams volunteer at least once during our season- we've gone to soup kitchens before, cleaned up trash, volunteered in a nursing home, etc. I believe the best way to generate community interest for a program is to show that we have interest in community as well. I also believe that volunteering and helping others is a great lesson to teach our athletes."

      Anonymous Answer

      "We will volunteer several times a year for a variety of charities that have supported us throughout the year. We will be there to support all school athletics."

      Rachelle's Answer

      You mention some excellent methods for generating community interest - well done! You may also want to consider discussing any previous efforts you have participated in (including your role, the role of your team, and some measurable details re: the positive outcome).

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  9. 9.

    What is one of the most important qualities to have as a coach?

      This question doesn't have a specific answer that the interview is looking for. The interviewer is looking to understand what type of culture you'll create as a coach for their team.

      You can pick any quality that you think it most important to you- supportive, knowledgeable, patient, etc. As long as you support why you picked that quality there isn't really a wrong answer you can give.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "The most important quality to have as a coach is to be patient. Each player has a different learning style and some will learn faster or slower than one another, so I believe it is most important to have patience for each player."

      Cassandra's Answer

      "For example: "The most important quality to have as a coach is to be knowledgeable about the sport. I always been updated on the newest drills and different techniques. I think it is most important for players to know that you know what you are talking about and that their coach is always willing to learn something new- as should they."

      Anonymous Answer

      "The most important quality to have is patience and knowledge. Soccer skills take a good while to develop and require you to know how to teach the first steps to learn how to play the game."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Essential skills, indeed! I recommend delivering your response in a way that attaches you to these qualities, vs. taking a third person 'you' approach. I've provided a slight revision, below.

      "I believe the most important qualities are patience and knowledge. As a coach, I understand that patience is required because it takes a good while to develop soccer skills. My knowledge of soccer, which comes from...(give the nod to your experience in soccer), is also important because I can successfully teach my players the first steps to learning how to play the game."

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "I believe the most important quality for a coach is patience. You can always gain more knowledge about the game and how to coach. But patience is something you either have or you don’t, and it is the key to success. Remember, Rome wasn’t built in a day."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Excellent advice! I recommend expanding on your answer a touch by including comments re: the ways you embody these essential qualities. I have provided an example for you below.

      "I believe the most important quality for a coach to possess is patience. As a coach, I can always gain more knowledge about the game and learn new coaching techniques. However, patience is something a person either has or does not have. I have a great deal of patience and believe this quality has been key to my success. I teach my team that 'Rome wasn't built in a day,' and I show them the importance of having patience with their teammates and with themselves."

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  10. 10.

    Our team finished top four last year, what would be your approach to improving the teams ranking this year?

      The interviewer wants to know that you are here to improve team- this doesn't always have to be focused on winning, but part of what we do is to help our players succeed at the sport.

      Being new to a team that is coming off a winning season isn't always easy, there will be push back against changing an approach that has been working. Players and parents can be resistant at first and important to remember that any frustrations come from a place of passion.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "Last season the team did a great job and I hope to continue that record for this coming season. I continue to learn new drills for improving skills on the court. I also believe in open and honest communication, so I like sitting down with my players and discussing what has made they successful in the best and what hasn't. Sometimes with team sports the individual athlete is forgotten about and how the majority of the team thrives is what over rules other needs, one of my strategies I use to improve season by season is looking at all individual needs and team needs and focus on fostering success."

  11. 11.

    How do you communicate your expectations to parents/guardians?

      Players do not always communicate well with their parents/guardians, the interviewer wants to know your style of communication. Every coach is different- some tell players to tell their parents, others create group emails/texts for parents/guardians to stay informed. There may be different policies and procedures around communication so just keep that in mind.

      You don't have to go into elaborate detail with this answer, just share how you've communicated with parents/guardians in the past or if you've only gone through your players. There isn't a wrong way to answer this question.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "In the past I've used group email with my parents/guardians to keep them informed about practice cancellations, games, fundraisers, and any team bonding plans. At the beginning of the season I have a group meeting with both the players and their parents, this way we can make sure we are all on the same page."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I have parents sign a contract that includes my rules and guidelines, as well as my expectations of parents. I give a presentation during a parent meeting night and hand out my contract for them to sign, along with the players."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Very nice approach! It sounds as though you are highly organized and purposeful when it comes to gaining buy-in from parents.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "At the beginning of season meeting, I would express my expectations to parents. I like to address both the players and the parents during these meetings so we are on the same page. If there is an issue going forward, my door is always open to talk about the specifics."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Your approach seems clear and straightforward! If you have a story-based example of a time when you had to clear up expectations with a parent/guardian, this is another excellent opportunity to incorporate some storytelling :)

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  12. 12.

    What is the most rewarding part of being a coach?

      The interviewer wants to know what keeps you going, what part of coaching keeps you coming back season after season. You don't need a huge elaborate answer for this question, you just have to find what drives you.

      It could be the thrill of the game when you have one minute left and your team is down by one or the look on your player's face when they get a touch down. Most of you already know what keeps you going; take time to thing about it prior to your interview, because the interviewer will want to know what will keep you going with their team.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I love the look on the teams' faces each time they score a well deserved point. It's seeing them working hard together and earning each point they get. They realize their true potential when they work as a team and everyone is doing their part."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Watching my players develop and master their skills. When we as a team accomplish our full potential."

      Rachelle's Answer

      These are rewarding factors, indeed. If you have a story-based example of a specific player whom you helped to develop, that would be a nice personal touch.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "The most rewarding part of being a coach is seeing players meet or exceed their goals."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Good start! This question could be an excellent opportunity to tell a story about a time when you felt this rewarding aspect of coaching young athletes. You could also give a qualifying statement in the end re: how you will bring this reward to this new team. I've provided an example below.

      "The most rewarding part of being a coach is seeing my players meet or exceed their goals. For instance, (tell a story using the STAR framework of Situation, Task, Action, Result). I look forward to joining this team and helping these young athletes realize their goals."

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  13. 13.

    What is your off-season conditioning program like?

      The interviewer wants to know your plans for your athletes when you no longer see them for practice every school. Off-season conditioning is a choice that coaches sometimes choose to do or not. Some of your athletes may be multi-sport players, do they fall into the same conditioning plans? Some coaches recommend that players exercise at least three days a week to keep in shape but other coaches don't expect their players to thing about the sport off season.

      No matter what your plan is for your athletes just be prepared to back it up.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I would love for all my players to play club season once they are done with our regular season but I know that isn't reasonable, because it gets expensive. I ask my athletes to try to exercise 3-4 times a week to say in shape, but when the season gets closer I encourage them to attend the open gyms lead by the seniors."

      Anonymous Answer

      "Our off-season conditioning program includes weightlifting, conditioning, skills-sessions, and playing in leagues."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Nice details! It may be a good idea to include a comment regarding the efficacy of your off-season conditioning program. For instance, do your players return stronger, more focused, newly skilled, etc.?

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  14. 14.

    If we asked one of your players to describe you and your qualities as a coach what sort of things would they say about you?

      The interviewer wants you to put yourself one of your player's shoes, if you haven't done this before you should considering doing it. It helps coaching understand how their message is coming across. For this question think about a few qualities you want to have as a coach and then think if you believe your players would see you that way, if yes explain why to the interviewer- if not it would be best to pick another quality.

      There is no right answer for this question as long as you back up your answer with why you believe your players would describe you with those qualities.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I believe the my players would describe me as honest and patient. I am very honest with my players on what they need to work on and what they need to change to get there. I had a player once who had incredible talent but she didn't practice as hard because she believed she was already the best player on the team. I had a conversation with about this and explain how much further she could go as an athlete if she put in the time. Another quality would be patient because I will always take the time to help a player is isn't grasping a concept."

      Anonymous Answer

      "They would say I was a good role model, that I cared for them as individuals first and players second. They would say that I was fair and never waivered from the team's core values."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Nicely said! It sounds as though you are a caring coach and know exactly where your leadership strengths shine through!

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  15. 15.

    What was your most successful team you have been a part of? Why was it successful?

      This question isn't meant to scare you if you don't have many winning records. You can use a team that you came in first and talk about how you lead the team to victory, but it is not the only way to approach this question.

      Success comes in many different forms, you can talk about a player that struggled at the beginning of the season to be part of the team and by the end he/she ended up being an important leader. You should think of a team that you were proud of by the end of the season (we are proud of all our teams, but one that really stuck out). When you are passionate about the team you pick, you'll be able to bring more engagement to your answer.

      Rachelle's Answer

      "The most successful team I was apart of was when I first started coaching club season. It was the first club for me as well as my girls., most of the girls came from many different schools and didn't know what to expect. All were still learning basic skills while trying to get to know each other, so they could be prepared to play together for the next six months. Club is much more challenging than I expected, because we all only saw each other once a week for practice, they weren't able to get to know each other very well. During practice and game days, I set aside time for team bonding time. During those team bonding times I watched the girls connect on a deeper level, which improved our playing on the court. We did not end in top four for the season, but they improved on the court with their skills and working together so much by the end of the season- that is what success is to me. Being able to see the positive change in the players."

      Anonymous Answer

      "My most successful team didn't have the best skills, but they had shown the most improvement and bonded well. As a coach, you want your players to work hard and become better student-athletes. At the end of the season, I was able to look at my team and think "Wow, they’ve came such a long way. Their improvement from the beginning of the season to the end was incredible." I’m a competitive coach and love to win, but at the end of the day, the most important aspect of your job is mentoring your athletes to better themselves, not just on the field but off the field as well."

      Rachelle's Answer

      This response is excellent! Very heartfelt, and I like that you made a distinction between success and skill.

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
      Anonymous Answer

      "My most successful team was the team I coached during my first year at the local high school. I was able to bring together players who were unfamiliar with each other and with varying skill levels and experience. I was able to get them to buy into a system and a common goal and play undefeated while carrying a B average throughout the year."

      Rachelle's Answer

      This sounds like a success indeed! If you can, I recommend adding a few more details around how you achieved this success. I have provided some starters for you below, and made a slight change by mentioning the success up front (undefeated & GPA details) rather than burying those details at the end.

      "My most successful team was during my first year at the local high school where we were undefeated, all while carrying a 'B' average GPA throughout the year. I was able to bring a range of players together who varied in skill level and experience by...(explain how you did this). The players did not know each other, and yet I was able to get them to all buy into a system, and a common goal by...(discuss)."

      Was this answer helpful? Yes or No
  16. 16.

    As a coach, what values do you have for your team?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  17. 17.

    Your previous coaching record does not show many successes. Why do you think we should appoint you?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  18. 18.

    Is there any further specific training you see yourself requiring to meet the needs of this position?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  19. 19.

    How long have you been coaching for?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  20. 20.

    How do you know when you have delivered a coaching session that is of high quality?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  21. 21.

    Why do you want to coach here?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  22. 22.

    How do you build trust with your athletes?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  23. 23.

    How do you handle criticism from fans?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  24. 24.

    As a coach, how would you develop trust with teachers?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  25. 25.

    How do you manage playing time?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  26. 26.

    What does a typical day at practice look like for you?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  27. 27.

    In fifteen years, what team do you see yourself coaching?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  28. 28.

    How important is winning compared to how your students are doing in the classroom?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  29. 29.

    Thinking about a challenging team you've been apart of, what was difficult about the team and how did you improve it?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.
  30. 30.

    Do you have any other experience coaching, besides this sport?

      View All 30 Coach Answers
      Sign up to access our library of 50,000+ Answers,
      plus coaches for one-on-one support, so you can interview more confidently.