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Veterinarian School Interview

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What ethical dilemmas do you think you may face as a veterinarian? How would you handle these?

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Veterinarian School Interview

  1. 1.

    What ethical dilemmas do you think you may face as a veterinarian? How would you handle these?

      How to Answer

      Being a vet you will be faced with ethical and moral dilemmas that require tackling professionally, and therefore it is essential that you research into this to ensure that you feel comfortable with some of the common situations that may present themselves. Researching prior to interview will show the interviewer that you have taken the time to look into this area, and also have the knowledge and understanding to handle a situation professionally.

      "I understand that veterinarians frequently encounter situations that are morally charged and potentially difficult to manage. I am sure that situations that involve euthanasia, end-of-life care, economics, and inadequate provision of care create practical and moral dilemmas. Ethical tension may be attributable to differences in beliefs regarding the moral value of animals, client and veterinary responsibilities, and deciding what is best for an animal."

      5 Community Answers

      Anonymous Answer

      "The most challenging ethical dilemmas that I could face would be euthanizing a healthy animal, end of life care, including deciding when it is time to let an animal go — also observing cases of animal abuse and negligence. An animal being refused treatment due to an owner’s difference in opinion. I feel I would always aim to give the best care possible to the animal, whether that be alleviating suffering, euthanizing them, or reporting a case to the authorities."

      Rachelle's Answer

      There will be many tough situations that you will face as a Veterinarian; however, your answer shows that you will always look for the angle that is best for the animal.

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      Anonymous Answer

      "Many different ethical dilemmas may occur, one being if your patient has been neglected by its owner. Second, if the client wants to perform a treatment on their animal that you may not agree with. Or if you are an owner of a clinic and someone from your staff is stealing money, medication, or supplies. I would handle the first situation by talking to the owner and assessing the situation. Secondly, I would explain my reasoning for why I do not want to perform that treatment, and if they insist, I can have them get a second opinion elsewhere. Lastly, I would terminate the staff member who was stealing."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Deep challenges, indeed, but you sound very prepared to deal with them in a way that is respectful. Good answer!

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      Anonymous Answer

      "An issue that I am well familiar with is in equine performance injuries, some clients and horse trainers don't allow horses the full rest period following treatment. It is often because time off is costly and delays potential earnings. I have seen a change in the industry that is more concerned with long term performance through increased opportunities for older aged horses and crediting a longer-lasting horse in the show pen, and I want to contribute to this change."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Another very unique response. You put the spotlight on a very important concern and present workable solutions for this dilemma. Well done!

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      Anonymous Answer

      "In any ethical dilemma, I want to handle it with great professionalism and moral responsibility. Euthanasia, cosmetic surgeries, abuse cases, etc. are just a few ethical dilemmas a veterinarian may face. The tension presented in ethical situations is based on differences in opinion based on the worth of an animal and possibly a lack of education on particular issues. When faced with problems, I would first and foremost explore all of my options and decide what provides the most benefit for the animal. In cases such as convenience euthanasia, it is important to define whether or not it is convenient, and many cases are situational."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Excellent, and full response. Very well said!

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      Anonymous Answer

      "I understand that veterinarians frequently encounter situations that are morally charged and potentially difficult to manage. I am sure that situations that involve euthanasia, end-of-life care, economics, and inadequate provision of care create practical and moral dilemmas. Ethical tension may be attributable to differences in beliefs regarding the moral value of animals, client and veterinary responsibilities, and deciding what is best for an animal. An example of this is the B12 deficiency I observed in a calf, there was a chance that the calf would not pull through, and the calf was not worth the economic gamble by paying to try the treatment."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Your example is an important one, and you do an exceptional job driving your point home. Very well crafted answer!

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