Top 25
Speech Pathology Interview Questions
1. Can you have a patient that has an aphasia and apraxia, and if so, which one would you address first? And how?
Professional Answer
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Human communication includes speech (articulation, intonation, rate, intensity, voice, resonance, fluency), language (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics), both receptive and expressive language (including reading and writing), and non-verbal communication such as facial expression, posture and gesture. Swallowing problems managed under speech therapy are problems in the oral and pharyngeal stages and sometimes esophageal stages of swallowing.
wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_pathology
Speech Pathology Interview Questions
2 of 25
Describe to me your best therapy session?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
My best therapy session was when I helped to create a communication passport for a client with severe aphasia that helped the patient make the right choices at meal times.
 
2.
While doing an internship I was treating a man with aphasia, he had a girlfriend and wanted to be able to send her appropriate text messages because he had word finding difficulties, we began practicing with messages and appropriate phrases and after a few sessions he and I shared a conversations through text.
 
3.
My best therapy session is one where the student is activitely participating in the activity.
 
4.
I was working with a child diagnosed with aspergers. He had great difficulty communicating socially. He also had difficulty intiating conversation. Up until that point we had been working on greetings and pronouns 'you' 'me' and 'I' That day of the session I was shocked and thrilled, as he saw me he said 'hello Mikaela, waving eagerly. This was a home visit, so when he saw his little sister he greeted her too using her name and the waving gesture. This was a huge deal and felt very rewarding seeing this progress. Then during the lesson, he started to grasp when to use the pronouns mentioned. Instead of talking about himself as first person e. G Gary is going to play, he would say "I am...." And "you are"
 
5.
- identifying the goal was inappropriate - discussed with mother this - needed to work on joint attention before we moved on to word production.
 
Question
3 of 25
What excites you the most about speech therapy?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I enjoy working one on one, and I love following a plan, and then revising the plan based on how a session went, or based on a goal being met. Helping people is obviously an interest of mine, because I wouldn't have gotten into the field if it wasn't.
 
2.
What excites me the most about speech therapy is the opportunity to learn something new each session. Speech Language pathology is not just a dry cut course an individual can take one course of. New theories, techniques, protocols are developed constantly so learning essentially never ends. I am able to better myself as a clinician with more and more experience.
 
3.
Working with kids in a school district and seeing there IEP goals an objectives accomplished.
 
4.
What excites me most about speech therapy would be watching the progress the child makes over a period of time and knowing that I was along side the child, helping them make progressive steps to better speech.
 
5.
The ever changing nature of the field. Having a patient/client become a more successful communicator.
 
Question
4 of 25
Talk to me about the controversies surrounding non-speech oral exercises?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
Regardless of not being able to voice, knowing the speech helpers is important to identify one's self. Signing is a language to help communicate.
 
2.
EBP does not support it. It is not speech based, it is muscular based and many studies show there is minimal muscle strength needed for speech.
 
3.
As a student still in graduate school, I haven’t had the experience to practice non-speech oral exercises. I have learned that there is no scientific evidence to prove that non-speech oral exercises are effective. However, I have heard that this can increase speech intelligibility.
 
4.
As stated before I know that overall the research cannot necessarily prove that they improve speech sounds, but they do not do any harm.
 
5.
Non-speech oral exercises are used in order to strengthen and improve the mobility of the articulators. These exercises are often used in speech therapy, especially on those with apraxia of speech. However, there is controversy in regards to the effectiveness of this type of therapy. It is argued that it is ineffective, and shouldn't be relied on. Some believe that if it's used in conjunction with other therapy methods it may be beneficial. But, like most therapy measures, the speech language pathologist should use their own clinical competencies in combination with current research and the clients needs in order to decide if this approach should be implemented in treatment.
 
Question
5 of 25
What are your experiences using oral motor approach to improve speech clarity?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I have used bite blocks, chews, suckers and oral motor exercises (i. E. Lip puckering, lateralization of the tongue, etc) to increase jaw strength, lip closure, to decrease drooling, to increase tongue strength and awareness in order to improve speech clarity and to increase awareness of the oral mechanisms for sound production. I am aware there is controversy when using oral motor approaches in therapy because there is not a lot of proven efficacy. Sometimes, I think it is necessary especially when working with the younger population when they are unaware of their mouths.
 
2.
I have not used the oral motor approach on purpose because evidence based practice is not solid that it works.
 
3.
The oral motor approach to improve speech clarity is beneficial since it ultimately strengthens the oral muscles. The oral motor approach is used by many Speech Language pathologists.
 
4.
I have experience using oral motor exercises to improve speech intelligibility. My results have been mixed. In some clients it made no difference in their intelligibility. In others, it worked.
 
5.
I have limited experience in this area, but I know that the research says it is not harmful, though it has not been proven to work either. If anything, it gets the student aware of their structures. Oral motor exercises, in my experience, are helpful for younger kids because they like being silly, and they are less self-conscious. An older child may want to do activities that he or she feels are more applicable to their classroom and social setting.
 
Question
6 of 25
Describe the special education referral process.
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
Special Ed referral process starts with an interested party realizing there is a possibility of disability. 2. A team meets and looks at scheduling an assessment. Ax is given, if child qualifies a team meets to make this decision an then they are qualified with a specific type of of disability. An IEP is then written and given to parents to accept and sign.
 
2.
A parent may contact the school if they detect his or her child having a possible disability. A teacher or school professional may also ask the parents’ consent for his or her child to be evaluated. In order for evaluation to begin, the parents must give either a written or verbal consent. Once parental consent is established then evaluation must be completed within 45 school working days.
 
3.
I think it depends on the schools policies and procedures, but I think the child is evaluated and then referred for a speech evaluation if necessary.
 
4.
Depends on the state qualifications and eligibility requirements. Typically a student is referred for evaluation, and the SLP assesses speech/language and/or articulation as needed.
 
5.
Being a brand new clinician, I do not have a lot of knowledge with regards to the special education referral process. However, I am a fast learner.
 
Question
7 of 25
Why did you decide to become a Speech and Language pathologist?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I decided to become a Speech and Language pathologist due to the endless job opportunities within the field. As a creative individual, I can use my creativity as an advantage to help treat clients who are never like the previous client. I have always had the heart to help individuals reach his or her full potential and ultimately have a positive impact on an individuals' life.
 
2.
Because I like help others.
 
3.
I decided to become a Speech and Language therapist because I believe that communication is at the core of what makes us human, we have a desire to communicate with each other. I want to help those who need additional support in that area. I also wanted to work with people and find language incredibly interesting, so I felt that this job combines all of this.
 
4.
I have wanted to be an SLP since I was fourteen. I developed nodules and found the therapy extremely interesting. I found out a bit more about what SLPs do through research. Having known since I was a child I wanted to do something that would be interacting with individuals (especially working with children) I immediately knew what I wanted to do for my lifes work.
 
5.
To help people with communication disorders.
 
Question
8 of 25
Have you helped a patient/student before? How rewarding was that for you?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
Yes! During my clinical experience in graduate school, I had a breakthrough with one of my clients with autism. Generally he would only speak in 1-2 word utterances. After a few weeks of therapy together, he was using full sentences to describe pictures. I felt amazing knowing that our time together contributed to his increase in speech output. It was great to see him grow and improve his MLU so quickly, and I was excited to see how he would improve during the rest of our time together.
 
2.
Yes, I helped a 5th grader see the value in accomplishing his communication goals in articulation. It was very rewarding.
 
3.
I love making others feel special, and appreciated. And I love helping others find their potential. It is always rewarding to help someone, for instance, give them a special chart to help them with tricky spelling issues.
 
4.
Yes, I have helped a patient learn to take train from home to downtown.
 
5.
Very rewarding. I love seeing them improve and helping them to feel better about daily activities.
 
Question
9 of 25
Would your friends or family, say you have a good patience?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
My friends and family would all agree that I do have a good patience. During my undergraduate and graduate career, I had worked in group homes with mentally disabled adults. This gave me the opportunity to work with several different individuals who were diagnosed with many different diagnoses.
 
2.
Yes, I am patient and willing to try new ways/modify techniques to maximize success.
 
3.
Yes, I think that they would tell you I am very patient in most activities in my life.
 
4.
Well, my family would probably tell you I'm impatient. However, my friends, especially those that I worked beside in the clinical setting always said they were amazed by how patient I would become with clients.
 
5.
Absolutely. I have always been even keeled and patient. I think it is critical within this field to not react with immediate emotion, but rather take the time to understand and empathize with the client.
 
Question
10 of 25
Do you prefer working with children or adults?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
Most of my experience is working with children, however, I have worked with young adults and find both rewarding.
 
2.
I prefer working with children. Most of my prior experience has involved working with children. I enjoy being part of their acquisition of language and the learning of it rather than having to re-teach speech and language.
 
3.
I have worked with adults in group homes since I was an undergrad, therefore I may have a better understanding of how to meet his or her needs of an adult population. However, since I have had limited experience with children doesn’t mean I wouldn’t like to work with children. It is important to keep an open mind because both populations have positive factors.
 
4.
Both. I have a natural connection with children though.
 
5.
Although I have experience with both groups, I feel as though I'm able to connect better with the younger population. I always feel more comfortable in my therapy sessions with children, and I find it easier to connect with them as opposed to adults.
 
Question
11 of 25
What experience do you have working with language disorders?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I have had many experiences working with students and language disorders, whether it be expressive or receptive modalities...
 
2.
I haven’t had the experience working with children or adults who have language disorders. I have worked in group homes with clients who exhibit language disorders, but not the extent in which I performed therapy.
 
3.
I have worked with language disorders at multiple levels. Both in peridatric evaluation, an individual client at the Edward's campus, preschool language at the KU Lawrence campus, reading and social language for two adults with Downs Syndrome, and my clinical practicum experiences at Regency Place Elementary School.
 
4.
I have experience in working with patients with expressive and receptive aphasia, cognition.
 
5.
Throughout my graduate career, I was exposed to a variety of language disorders. For instance, I had a teenaged client that had difficulty with both receptive and expressive language. He had trouble in processing directions, reading comprehension, and creating sentences pertaining to a certain topic. Throughout our time together, we targeted these areas and over time he began to show improvement.
 
Question
12 of 25
Why are you the best candidate for us?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I am a hard worker and I work well with others. Speech therapy is fun and I enjoy the diversity of the clients that I will have. Even though I do not have much field experience yet, I am always willing and excited to learn new information. If hired for this position, I will do my best to provide the best for each client. I am very passionate about my job and I will continue working as hard as I can to become the best speech therapist I can be.
 
2.
Because I have over 25 years of working in speech therapy and I work well with children and staff.
 
3.
Because I have over 25 years of working in speech therapy and I work well with children and staff.
 
4.
I am the best candidate for you because I am a hard-worker, a team player, a life-long learner an will not disappoint you. I am so passionate about speech and language therapy and feel that I am very qualified for this position.
 
5.
I skipped some questions and couldn't go back to answer them, that doesn't help. I am a good candidate because I am willing to learn, enjoy research and passing on my knowledge to students.
 
Question
13 of 25
Describe any clinical experience you have had in undergrad.
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
One of the experiences that helped me during my future was the fact I had to work in different circumstances such out in the hallway, in book closets and never really had a room of my own.
 
2.
I had the experience to complete 25 clinical hours within a skilled nursing facility. I was able to observe several patients who were diagnosed with dysphagia and cognitive disabilities.
 
3.
I had the opportunity to observe multiple clinicians in multiple settings during my undergraduate level. I then also had the opportunity to work under a speech clinician in the school setting for 3 days a week during my final semester at Geneva College. I was able to have my own case load and worked with multiple disorders. I made multiple lesson plans and even made my own materials to help with corresponding lessons.
 
4.
During my undergraduate education, we were not provided with any hands-on clinical experience. I did, however, observe many different therapy sessions in a wide variety of settings, including schools and hospitals.
 
5.
In undergrad, I did 25 hours of observation time within the field. I spent a week in a school job-shadowing an SLP, as well as a week in a hospital. It was an eye-opening experience for me. At the time I had limited information on what an SLP actually does throughout the day. The experience gave me a snapshot of what it is like to be an SLP, which I believe helped verify that I chose the correct major for me.
 
Question
14 of 25
What are your thoughts about inclusion and pull outs as therapy models?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I believe that both inclusion and pull out as a therapy model can be very beneficial. It is a right that everyone has fair and equal opportunity of learning and I believe that these models may be one of the best opportunities for the patients.
 
2.
I like inclusion because it gives the student a chance to be with other students on their grade level, however, pull outs are necessary for those that need 1-1 sessions which is determined by the testing and IEP.
 
3.
I believe it depends on the student and whether or not direct intervention needs to occur to make progress.
 
4.
When it comes to inclusion and/or pull outs as therapy models it really depends on the patient. Both models can be successful depending on what deficits are present.
 
5.
My thoughts are that I believe as long as a child can learn within the classroom and the SLPA can push in therapy that is the best environment. However, I support the idea that some children really need that one on one session within the speech room.
 
Question
15 of 25
Describe how you currently work or communicate with caregivers?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
We have several ways. I communicate via email, parent/teacher conferences, homework sent home and IEPs. These avenues help communicate day to day activities along with the the overall goals.
 
2.
Caregivers are the base to help with the person involved and need to be aware of concerns, it is good to establish a good rapport to gain progress.
 
3.
I am currently still in graduate school, but I have learned that it is equally as important to educate caregivers as providing therapy to patients.
 
4.
I commuicated on a daily basis with nurses, aids, dietician and family members regarding current deficits and use of diet modificsations or strategies that assist with general care of patient.
 
5.
At the beginning and end of each therapy session, I try to check in with the caregiver to see what their current concerns are and to let them know of the progress of the child. I make sure they understand what it is we work on in therapy. It also allows time to make sure the caregiver is comfortable with our current goals or express their thoughts and feelings about therapy and how they wish to see it influence the child.
 
Question
16 of 25
What speech therapy method do you practice the most?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
It depends on the student's IEP and testing results which encourage the type of therapy to use, language, speech programs using Chompsky, Skinner or Browns stages,
 
2.
As a student still in graduate school I haven’t had the opportunity to work with many methods. However, I am motivated to learn much more once I enter clinic.
 
3.
I use scaffolding the most in speech therapy. I think it is important in order for the child to learn the skill and to acquire the skill. It is important to recognize when you need to change your level of support.
 
4.
I really enjoy using storybooks to work on all aspects of language. So guided storybook intervention.
 
5.
I wouldn't say that there is a single method I practice most. I make sure that each client receives treatment specific to their needs. With that said though, I have the most experience in working with children with autism. For them, we tend to focus on the social aspects of communication. With them, I often work on conversational turn-taking, eye contact, and fluency and intonation patterns. One method that I tend to implement is the creation and use of a visual intonation board. With this, the child is able to visual see how their intonation should fall or rise when making a statement vs. Asking a question. Since children with autism tend to be visual learners, I've found this method extremely effective.
 
Question
17 of 25
What are your research interests?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I am interested in fluency and the nuances of treatment for it. I am also interested in PD and the research I did on increasing approaches to increase intensity in PD patients.
 
2.
Many. The computer offers many issues and types of problems I can research. It intriegues me to read information or ask questions.
 
3.
I have a passion for working with non-verbal children who require augmentative and assistive technology in order to communicate. Since technology is forever changing and growing, I am constantly researching and try to stay current on augmentative and alternative communication.
 
4.
As a school-based Speech Pathologist, I am interested in a variety of topics.
 
5.
I am very interested in learning more about Autism and the different intervention strategies that are used to benefit children in their environment.
 
Question
18 of 25
What excercise do you encourage the most for NS-OME?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I think tongue exercises are the most important/effective since the tongue is involved in the articulation of almost all speech sounds.
 
2.
When it comes to the NS-OME, it really depends on the child and the most difficult obstacles. Some exercises that I encourage are: blowing, wagging the tongue back and forth, elevating the tongue to nose and to chin, blowing a kiss, curling of the tongue, and also puffing of the cheeks.
 
3.
I believe that the most beneficial exercise would consist of exercising the cheeks and lips to allow for better air pressure and articulation support. This would include blowing motions, puffing out the cheeks, and making kissing lips.
 
4.
Blowing, kissing, looking in the mirror and smiling, sticking out tongue, retracting tongue. Protruding lips.
 
5.
I am a strong believer that NS-OME do not have evidential support for use in therapy. However, with regards to a patient in a hospital setting, I can understand having them become more aware of their own oral cavity, if that is what the situation calls for.
 
Question
19 of 25
What kind of help do you need to do your best work?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
Space to work and access to good therapy material.
 
2.
My weakest area is the commputer. Once some one shows me the program to use, I can be on my own. Things such as putting info on flash drives, is a weak area.
 
3.
I believe for me to do the best work possible, I need to have the ability to communicate with the student's teachers, parents, and other people who interact with the child on a daily basis. I want to be able to have the best understanding of what the child's needs are, and how I can best help them so that they may succeed in life.
 
4.
In order to do my best work, I like to have a lot of resources and variety. I think a person gets bored when you work on the same thing everyday using the same materials. In order to do my best work, I like to mix things up every so often and I also like to make the activity interactive. I like to theme my activities to the holiday, season, or anything else significant.
 
5.
Clear understanding of expectations, resources to complete theraputic activities, known chain of command and knowlege of documentation system.
 
Question
20 of 25
What are your experiences working with articulation?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I enjoy working with articulation with students. Sometimes they are not hearing the phoneme or don't know how to make a sound. They also need a reason to speak and communicate.
 
2.
I have a lot of experience with working on articulation. When working with individuals on the articulation of speech sounds, it is important to work on the placement of the articulators, discuss the manner in which the speech sound is produced and whether or not you use your voice for the sound. It is also important to incorporate auditory discrimination activities so the individual knows what the sound sounds like. I like to provide reinforcement intermittently and provide the individual with a lot of the practice and repetition of the speech sound.
 
3.
As a first year graduate student, I haven’t had the opportunity to work with a population exhibiting articulation errors. However, as I continue my graduate career I will become more equipped to those with articulation deficits.
 
4.
I have both treatment and evaluation experience regarding articulation, most frequently with school aged children.
 
5.
I have had limited experience with articulation, but I have had some experience with multiple phonemes. While working on the different phonemes I had the opportunity to try out multiple techniques. During this time I saw not only improvement, but success and phonemes being mastered.
 
Question
21 of 25
What are your experiences working with cognitive disabilities?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
As in TBI, students may need more visuals, more information to help understand our language and concepts.
 
2.
I worked in a nursing home in graduate school and provided cognitive therapy to individuals who had recently fallen or were diagnosed with dementia. We would work on activities of daily living, memory books and word recall strategies. I have also worked with children with cognitive disabilities including children with down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and children with low intelligence.
 
3.
I will become more equipped in working with those who have cognitive disabilities once I begin my clinic at the University. However, I did gain much knowledge during my aphasia class.
 
4.
I have never had experience working with any type of population who may have a cognitive disability, but I would be willing to learn more about that population in preparation to work with them.
 
5.
Larage amount of experience since I have worked with a geriatric popilation for majority of career. Memory strategies established and education of staff and fammily.
 
Question
22 of 25
Describe to me your graduate education?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I paid as I took a course. Research was enjoyable. I was an older student and paired with other students, one student was from a foriegn country and we compiled a book together about early childhood language.
 
2.
As previously mentioned, I completed my graduate education at St. Louis University as well. Being in a city provided me and my fellow classmates with many different opportunities for our externships as well as the opportunity to work with a variety of different populations as well as socio-economic statuses. We had a small class size, supportive faculty and many opportunities to discover which path you wanted to take (i. E. Medical, educational, geriatrics, pediatrics, etc).
 
3.
At the moment I am currently still in graduate school, but the experience has been great thus far. I am looking forward to getting hands-on experience when I begin clinic this upcoming summer.
 
4.
I am currently finishing my graduate degree at Clarion University, located in Clarion, PA. Clarion is a well known school which has a that is ASHA accredited program. I have had classes dealing with multiple areas of communication disorders including: aphasia, motor speech disorders, stuttering, children language disorders, articulation, Augmentative and Alternative Communication and multiple other courses.
 
5.
Kent State Universit where in completed clinical experience in the university voice clinic, English Language Proficiency clinic, Aural rehab clinic, Family child learning center, and a practicum at the Garfield Hospital in CLeveland Ohio.
 
Question
23 of 25
Speech therapy can cost your patient a lot of money, do you worry about the cost for the patient when doing your job?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
I consider the patient first and why I am there for him/her.
 
2.
Yes, definitely. Since therapies are costly, it is important to me to stay current in order to provide the best therapy I can.
 
3.
Yes, I have thought about the cost that comes along with therapy for my patient. Once I begin practicing, I will try my best to provide services for my patient that are cost effective and educate my clients on techniques that can be performed at home.
 
4.
If I had a patient who couldn't afford to come to therapy every week for multiple sessions, I would try hard to be very flexible with him or her. I would send home worksheets every week so they practice as much as possible and then hopefully I could eliminate the amount of sessions needed per week. I want to improve the quality of life for each patient so that he or she may succeed in life rather than try to make a larger profit for myself.
 
5.
Of course. As a speech therapist, I think it's difficult not to worry about all aspects of the patient's life. You want them to improve as a whole, not just in speech. Currently, I have the luxury of working in a nonprofit clinic that works with clients financially. However, I am aware of the realities of cost and the stress that can put on a client.
 
Question
24 of 25
Are you okay working the same career for 30 years?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
Yes. I think the nice thing about speech and language therapy is that every day is different and every child is different. I also think it is nice that as a speech therapist, you can work in a variety of settings.
 
2.
Certainty. The field of Speech Language pathology is great because there are so many different career paths that can be chosen. Speech Language pathology has abundant opportunities.
 
3.
I believe that this is the career that I will be working for the next 30 years easily. I have such a passion and love for this career and a love for all the people who I would be helping. I can see myself thoroughly enjoying and thriving in this profession for many more years to come.
 
4.
Yes. I love working adults and the elderly. I can easily relate and have a good rapport with the majority of my patients. It is challenging but also rewarding to help those in need.
 
5.
I am more than excited to work in the same field for 30 years. I think the uniqueness of being a speech pathologist is the room to grow as a therapist within the field.
 
Question
25 of 25
Do you like to work in teams or are you an individual achiever?
 
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
Although I am a self-starter, I definitely work well with teams. I like collaboration and make a point to communicate with teachers and the rest of the team often to review progress.
 
2.
Both...Depends on the situation.
 
3.
I enjoy working on teams. I think collaboration is so important in order to best serve the child or adult. Therapies are most effective when everyone is working towards one common goal and on the same page.
 
4.
When it comes reaching an end goal, I like to communicate with other professionals to collaborate all ideas then making a competent decision regarding my client.
 
5.
I thrive in both settings because I am so high achieving and believe that the help of others can be very beneficial, but I also am able to thoroughly assess the situation to make decisions on my own.
 
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