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How do you deal with difficult parents?
User Submitted Interview Answers
1.
By letting them know their child difficulties and calendar.
 
2.
Well the subject matter itself, religion at a Catholic school, is not always the most motivating content for high school students especially if they are not Catholic and resent having to take a religion course. Although, I must admit the biggest challenge for myself was to not deviate from the Catechism, which I was being paid to teach and endorse, while also allowing my students to express their views respectfully and seriously in class discussions or Socratic seminars .
 
3.
The challenge I faced was to get students to communicate their feelings in a positive way.
 
4.
The biggest challenge was understanding how to talk to the kids and build a relationship with them, especially my most troubled kids.
 
5.
Adhering to a highly scripted reading program when teaching at the elementary. The position I held before that had very little programming laid out for me to follow. I was accustomed to making my own way and being empowered with plenty of self-direction in terms of instructional choices and curriculum choices which ironical was difficult at first and over time became a strength and personal preference. So when I started teaching at the elementary I had to adjusted to that and I have done so very well at this point.
 
6.
The biggest challenge I faced was going in with a small window to prepare my lessons, unit plans, notes, etc. For the students I was about to teach. I was given the job on a thursday and started the following monday picking up where the other teacher left off. The difficulty was the stress it created of wanting to be fully prepared, meeting the needs of the students while also meeting the objectives of the teacher I was filling in for. At the same time this challenge was a great learning experience for me on time management, preparation, planning, and adapting my lessons to what the feel and responses were from my students. I was allowed to really create my lessons from scratch, my notes from scratch with borrowed parts from previous lessons I had done or from the teacher I was filling in. The challenge was knowing what direction to go, why I wanted to go that direction, and how it would effect the learning environment as a whole.
 
7.
Being able to keep my position. Due to my schedule, I was not free when the teachers of the students I worked with directly were not free. This made it difficult to meet with them regarding students and collaboration.
 
8.
Student apathy and lack of motivation towards Social studies topics.
 
9.
I felt as if I received very little support from my team members and that my admins presupposed that I had been working within a certain framework that should have naturally been familiar to me. it made me feel uncomfortable asking questions or seeking advice.
 
10.
Maintaining student motivation without being able to differentiate the content, process, and products of learning.