MockQuestions

Academic Dean Interview Questions

30 Academic Dean Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns
Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.

Question 1 of 30

Tell me about a time when you improved communication between yourself and a co-worker or client.

Academic Dean Interview Questions

  1. 1.

    Tell me about a time when you improved communication between yourself and a co-worker or client.

      How to Answer

      Possessing the skills to improve communication in the workplace is a precious asset. Talk to the interviewer about your ability to enhance communication in the workplace.

      Answer Examples

      Rachelle's Answer

      "In my current position I have one particular board member who is an exceptionally brief communicator. If I ask two questions, he will answer just one. I learned quickly that he would not acknowledge anything he did not have a direct answer for. I began to ask him questions in a different way. For example, I will say 'Do you have an answer for me on question X?' and he will say yes or no. We then go from there. This is a useful method of communication for that particular individual."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I had a faculty member who often missed email updates. It caused us to cross our wires a few times. I suggested that we book a quick call every week to review any outstanding areas that need to be addressed. This process worked well for us."

      Rachelle's Answer

      "I once worked on a robust project with team members from multiple locations. At first, we were just emailing back and forth, but that wasn't working. I implemented a regular conference call to iron out issues and communicate updates."

      Anonymous Answer

      "While I have done numerous performance plans (sometimes with HR), I most proud that when I was promoted to Chair, I struggled to communicate with a long-term faculty member who had more experience than me. I sensed that she had wanted the promotion I ultimately received, and she was no longer in leadership. What I did was informal. I had an office by hers, and I made sure my door was open when I knew she was between classes. We would chit chat and I got to know her concerns, her struggles, her life. She had stories to tell, as we all do, and this informal approach made it easier for us to communicate in more formal settings. It seemed like a trust issue. We didn't trust each other until we really got to know each other, and it helped me understand where her strengths were so I could put her in positions where she could succeed. For example, she's wonderful with first-year students as she has a daughter around the same age, and we decided to put her in our introduction to Fine Arts course, which has proven to be very successful."

      Cindy's Answer

      That's a great example, and the story-telling format is effective. You could expand on why you had issues with this faculty member and why you think the informal approach worked. Was it ultimately a trust issue? Did you learn anything after you solved the problem?

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      Anonymous Answer

      "We tend to be a very email oriented institution. While that has benefits, sometimes, a phone call if the client or co-worker is distant or a brief meeting improves communication. I have utilized these methods with students, faculty, peers, superiors, and clients. There is an additional level of communication and clarification that occurs face to face or over the phone and especially face to face that improves communication. An example is when I took members of our Registrar's office to lunch. I also have F2F meetings with the lead coordinators of projects weekly or biweekly."

      Rachelle's Answer

      Wonderful. Your answer is clear, and you make a very solid point re: the importance of phone calls when the situation needs it.

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