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Quantitative Risk Management Interview
Questions

28 Questions and Answers by Ryan Brunner

Published October 3rd, 2019 | Ryan has over 10 years of experience interviewing
candidates in the healthcare, public service, and private manufacturing/distribution industries.
Question 1 of 28
Would you say that you are a goal oriented person on the job? Why would you say that?
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How to Answer
Success in business consulting is most often measured in the achievement of goals for clients and for this question, your interviewer will ideally be looking to hear that you are driven by goals and that you have the ability to set them as well. In your answer, give your interviewer the sense that you are goal oriented by giving an example or two of a time where you set and worked towards a goal as part of a team effort. Explain your part in the achievement of the goals and your ability to stay focused on the end result.
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Top 25 Quantitative Risk Management, Inc. Interview Questions with Full Content
1.
Would you say that you are a goal oriented person on the job? Why would you say that?
Success in business consulting is most often measured in the achievement of goals for clients and for this question, your interviewer will ideally be looking to hear that you are driven by goals and that you have the ability to set them as well. In your answer, give your interviewer the sense that you are goal oriented by giving an example or two of a time where you set and worked towards a goal as part of a team effort. Explain your part in the achievement of the goals and your ability to stay focused on the end result.

Ryan's Answer #1
"If hired for this position, one of the first things that you'll learn about me is that I am very driven to succeed in all that I do on the job. For me, personal drive definitely centers around goals and my desire to achieve them. I have the focus to set goals myself and to work towards goals that are set by my organization, my leaders or my customers and I would bring this ability with each client that I work with here at Quantitative Risk Management."
Ryan's Answer #2
"I would definitely say that I am goal oriented in the work that I do on a daily basis. In project management, I work off of both time related goals and production related goals and these really drive my daily tasks and my delegation of responsibilities to other team members. If given the opportunity to come work for Quantitative Risk Management, my clients would greatly benefit from my ability to both set and achieve goals with them."
2.
Give an example of a time you used data in analyzing risk for an organization. Did you utilize any tools in this process?
Gathering and analyzing data is an important step that any risk management professional must take during their evaluation processes. What's even more important than gathering and analyzing is putting the data to use to achieve results. For this question, talk in detail about a time that you used data in a working situation. Explain the tools, whether it was specific software or a spreadsheet, to help analyze and get results out of the data you collected.

Ryan's Answer #1
"As you can see from my resume, I've spent a good portion of my career working in the manufacturing industry. In that industry, a good deal of my risk focus was on employee safety and lost time prevention. When I took my current position, I analyzed data over the past ten years to find trends on workplace injuries that led to work comp claims. By using a very intricate Excel spreadsheet that I created, I was able to find a few different problem areas. From there, I worked with management and our safety coordinator to implement new work practices and policies moving forward."
Ryan's Answer #2
"In my current role, I am using the Resolver risk management software and it has really been an effective tool in storing and analyzing data and then helping put the data to functional use. Last year, I was tasked with leading a team of individuals to assess risk of potential defective products that my organization was putting to market. My job was to research and gather data on potential lawsuit risk that the organization could be looking at while others focused on the internal pieces that would fix the problem. Resolver was a great tool for our whole project and luckily, my organization didn't face any lawsuits based on our quick work."
3.
At Quantitative Risk Management, you will have the opportunity to work with high level executives and leaders from the companies we contract with. What experience do you have in working with people at these levels?
As a business advisory and consulting firm, Quantitative Risk Management works with Managers, Directors, CEO's, CFO's, CAO's and leaders with other titles on all of our projects. Your role will likely involve working closely with these leaders. For this question, your interviewer will be looking to hear that you are comfortable in working with the leadership team of the organization's clients by having you talk about your experience. Make sure that the examples you provide include some details on how you worked effectively to get the job done with the leaders you worked with.

Ryan's Answer #1
"In my current role, I work directly under our Chief Financial Officer and sit on a couple of different committees that our Chief Executive Officer is on. Under the direction of my CFO, we have a great working relationship. I am comfortable approaching him at any moment with questions or to bring forward new ideas. He is aware of my strengths and respects my opinions on matters in my wheelhouse, so he never hesitates to come to me with important things. I think the keys to our strong relationship are the respect we show for each other and our open lines of communication."
Ryan's Answer #2
"Throughout my career, I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with employees at all levels of the organizations that I've worked with. To me, working effectively with anyone requires a personal touch and a respectful approach. Whether I work with front line sales staff or members of the C-Suite, I take the time to get to know the person, their job and how I can best be of help to them in my role. This approach really helped me build a relationship with a Sales Executive that a few of my colleagues had struck out with in recent interactions."
4.
A career move to a consultant with Quantitative Risk Management may find you working on new challenges that you haven't faced during your career. What's been the most challenging project you've led up to this point in your career?
No matter what challenge you choose to discuss during your answer to this question, keep in mind that your interviewer is mostly looking to hear how you handled yourself during a time when you were pushed to your limits. In your answer, discuss the importance of being resourceful and team oriented and talk about how these things helped lead to success in the project. Also, be sure that your interviewer walks away from the interview knowing that you are willing and able to tackle any challenge in front of you.

Ryan's Answer #1
"Looking back at the 12 years of project management experience that I have, the most challenging project I led was about five years ago. The challenge started from the beginning when I was tasked with improving waste efficiency at one of my organizations warehouses. At the time, I was not very well versed in warehouse operations, so I took the time to research and talk to experts within my organization to start the brainstorming process. The high level leader that tasked me with the project didn't really do a great job of defining any end goals for me and those are really important in planning for a project. So I scheduled several follow up meetings with him to define more specific goals for the project. In the end, I assembled a great team of experts that ended up reducing costly waste by almost 80% in our operation."
Ryan's Answer #2
"I'd have to say that the most challenging project I have faced during my career was a project that assembled team members from different departments within a manufacturing plant operation. During the planning and kickoff process where we all met together, I got the sense that things would run smoothly and cohesively and was I ever wrong. As I monitored progress, I quickly noticed that we were getting off schedule on initial deadlines. In communicating out to team members, it became evident that internal communication at this plant was a struggle. As some team members told me in person that there was a lot of internal strife between some of the departments, I decided to call a project meeting to discuss my expectations for communications while also holding a team building exercise. I made it a priority to clear the air right away that bickering and childish behavior would not be tolerated and that we were all working toward a common goal that benefited everyone. Following that, the team building activity really helped make some eyes open up to who people were really working with. By taking the bull by the horns and putting people in an uncomfortable situation, a difficult situation turned into a team that accomplished a major task with ease and teamwork."
5.
If hired here at Quantitative Risk Management, you may have to step out of your comfort zone working in new industries. How will you be able to make this potential seamless?
Because risk managers work across many different industries, a move to a consultant role could put you working with clients in insurance, banking, manufacturing or many other industries. For this question, talk about your knowledge of the risk management job that is consistent across industries and be able to apply that knowledge to clients from any industry. To really help your answer here, try to do as much research on Quantitative Risk Management and their clients as possible prior to your interview so you can tailor your answer to meet their needs.

Ryan's Answer
"I think my years in the banking industry can be very beneficial to the clients here at Quantitative Risk Management. Financial risk and technology risks are my forte and these areas of expertise can be beneficial to your clients in the healthcare industry, the insurance industry and the manufacturing industry. I'd also greatly look forward to this challenge to help broaden my skills as a professional."
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