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Jump Trading

27 Interview Questions & Answers

1.
If hired for this position at Jump Trading, what factors would you consider part as part of an organization's long-term liability?
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Ryan's Advice
To begin for this question, make sure that you can define a long-term liability as obligations that are due beyond one year and into the future. Then, consider major factors like bonds, mortgages, leases and other items that factor in to an organization's long-term liability. Last, try to explain why the measurement of long-term liabilities are important is an important factor in considering the overall financial health of an organiation.

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1.
If hired for this position at Jump Trading, what factors would you consider part as part of an organization's long-term liability?
To begin for this question, make sure that you can define a long-term liability as obligations that are due beyond one year and into the future. Then, consider major factors like bonds, mortgages, leases and other items that factor in to an organization's long-term liability. Last, try to explain why the measurement of long-term liabilities are important is an important factor in considering the overall financial health of an organiation.

Ryan's Answer
"While long-term liabilities aren't an immediate issue on a companies working capital, the can become an issue if long-term liabilities pile up too high for some organizations. While often overlooked, items like mortgages, fleet vehicle loans and annuities can add up over time and are always items that I consider when looking at the overall health of an organization."
2.
If you notice right now, the time on that clock reads 12:15. What is the angle between the minute and hour hands on that clock?
In any interview with a Financial Engineer or Quantitative Analyst, your interviewer will be looking to pose one or a few different math related questions to show you have the quick skills to come up with a correct answer. For this question, talk your way through how you solved the problem so your interviewer gets a sense that you have the ability to solved basic, and even advanced, math problems.

Ryan's Answer
"With each hour on the clock representing 30 degrees of the 360 degree circle, I'd use a starting point of 90 degrees for an angle for this answer. But then, I have to factor the hour hand now moving a quarter of the way between the 12 and 1 on the clock. with a quarter of that move being 7.5 degrees, the angle between the hands falls at 82.5 degrees."
3.
There will be great days at Jump Trading and some days that are tougher to get through. When you suffer a setback, how does that emotionally affect you and your work?
Everyone handles the stress and disappointment of setbacks differently. Discuss with the interviewer how you typically cope with delays in the workplace.

Ryan's Answer #1
"Experiencing a setback is always disappointing, and can be a bit disheartening, but I understand that it happens from time to time. If I experience a major setback, I will take a few moments to debrief with my manager and discuss what I could have done differently. Then, I move on!"
Ryan's Answer #2
"Setbacks are tough, but I truly believe that everything happens for a reason. I am a creative person and will always find a way to recover from a setback."
4.
Can you think of a situation where raising debt over equity would be beneficial?
Debt and equity have a very closely bonded relationship with each other in relation to a company's finances. In most situations, raising debt can create too high of an amount of pressure to meet payments versus raising equity. But, there are a few key situations where there is a distinct advantage in raising debt over equity and your interviewer will be looking to hear that you understand at least one of those advantages to be tax shielding, reducing cost of capital and not diluting the stake for investors.

Ryan's Answer #1
"In the situations where I've advised an organization to increase debt, they've received a distinct advantage in a lower cost form of financing versus equity financing. In the end, this reduced the organization's WACC and came out to be a win for them."
Ryan's Answer #2
"Last year, I advised a manufacturer to take the debt over equity route when adding a new line of products that was guaranteed to be very profitable. This fact allowed the company to simply and quickly repay the loan plus interest while being able to reap the rewards of the extra profits. In that same case using equity, final profit would've been less."
5.
If you noticed that a company's balance sheet was showing increased amounts of accounts receivables, what future impacts to that company would you consider to be feasible?
At the root of this question, your interview will be looking to hear that you understand how the different lines on a company's balance sheet are related to each other. In your answer, be sure to point out your understanding of this as your job as an analyst with Jump Trading will rely on your ability to do so.

Ryan's Answer #1
"An organization's lines on a balance sheet all have impact on other lines. In the case that I was made aware of an increase in accounts receivable for an organization, I would note that cash flow could be directly impacted and give a higher chance that the organization didn't have enough money to operate. As well, the reduced value of assets is a real possibility for that organization."
Ryan's Answer #2
"In reality, an increase in amounts receivable can have both a positive and negative impact. In the short term, accounts receivable show up as current-period revenue and have a positive effect on income statements. But over the long-term, a large increase in amounts receivable has a negative impact on cash-flow for the company."
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