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Emerald Group Publishing Limited Interview
Questions

30 Questions and Answers by Rachelle Enns

Updated April 20th, 2019 | Rachelle is a job search expert, career coach, and headhunter
who helps everyone from students to fortune executives find success in their career.
Question 1 of 30
How would you increase Emerald Group's magazine subscriptions in an online-centric world?
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How to Answer
In a world immersed in online content, the hiring authority at Emerald Publishing would like to know how you would capture the interest of new readers to their thousands of published journals. Discuss one idea you have that would help print media to stand out in an online world.
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Top 30 Emerald Group Publishing Limited Interview Questions with Full Content
1.
How would you increase Emerald Group's magazine subscriptions in an online-centric world?
In a world immersed in online content, the hiring authority at Emerald Publishing would like to know how you would capture the interest of new readers to their thousands of published journals. Discuss one idea you have that would help print media to stand out in an online world.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Print media is still very relevant, especially when a publication attracts a particular niche. In an online-centric world, I would place focus on the nostalgia that comes from reading your favorite magazine, along with the fact that Emerald has been a trusted source for journals and educational media since 1967."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Many people still love the offering of traditional magazines and journals. To increase subscriptions or readership, I would remain hyper-focused on best serving the niche you do best at Emerald."
2.
What are your salary expectations?
In many states, it is now illegal for hiring authorities to ask about your current earnings. A question like this will give the interviewer a solid idea of what you are hoping to earn.

When you change positions, you want to see an increase in wage. Most interviewees will typically aim for a 7-15% increase for each time they change jobs. This range offers room for negotiations with the new company. This percentage increase reflects economic inflation, the unique skills you bring to the table from the last time you joined an organization, and growth in responsibilities.

The best way to discuss your salary expectations is to use your current earnings as an example if you are comfortable doing so. If this makes you uncomfortable, do give as many indicators as you can. Be open, and honest. Transparency is the best choice when salary based questions arise.

If you are newer to your career, or the area, and are unsure of what a fair ask may be, there are many reliable salary calculators available online.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Currently, I earn a base salary of $65,000 per year, and I would like to earn slightly higher in my next position, as I have additional certifications since my last salary negotiation took place."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I would like to earn slightly above where I am now. Currently, I earn $15/hour plus benefits and a 10% commission on all sales. My target income for the coming year is $45,000."
3.
How do you handle stress on the job?
The interviewer would like to know if you can appropriately handle the stress related to this job. Discuss how you can thrive, even during the most stressful times. You can keep your answer brief. If you can, provide an example of a time when you implemented a stress-management technique in your current role.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I handle stress very well, and when you call my references, they will attest to this fact. When I am under pressure on the job, I focus on the task at hand and make sure not to get distracted. Staying on a deadline is very helpful, and I will delegate when necessary to alleviate some stress."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Stress is part of any demanding job, and I embrace it to the fullest. I take good care of myself and prioritize my workload to maintain a healthy balance in my stress levels."
4.
How was your performance measured, in your most recent role?
The interviewer would like to understand better the key performance indicators you needed to meet in a more recent role, and how precisely those KPI's were measured. A good interviewer will recognize that the top candidates ALWAYS understand how they were measured, and where they landed in regards to their performance against others in a similar role.

It is a red flag to an interviewer if the interviewee responds with 'I don't know,' or worse yet - 'My company didn't measure my performance in any way.' Every company pays attention to employee performance metrics; it's just that some ways are more evident than others.

Some ways that your employer might measure your performance:

- The rate of absence, late days, and sick days
- Setting specific objectives for you, related to a task
- Amount of work returned or error counting
- Timed tasks
- Feedback provided by coworkers and management
- Number of sales

Rachelle's Answer #1
"In my previous role as a content marketer for a digital publisher, my employer measured me by a range of social media analytics, client feedback, and overall satisfaction, as well as project churn rate. My KPI's were always sitting about 20% above expectations."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"We had online customer surveys in my most recent role. Another KPI was the number of items sold per transaction. I was consistently in the top 10 out of 100 for our region."
5.
What have you done to improve your knowledge in the last year?
The interviewer wants to know that you are interested in your industry, and career growth, enough to take your professional development into your own hands. Even if your current employer does not offer perks like industry conferences or tuition reimbursement, there is no reason why you cannot take the initiative.

You could:

- Read industry or career-related books
- Subscribe to relevant podcasts
- Enhance your education with an additional certificate
- Attend a conference related to your career or personal growth
- Teach yourself a new software program
- Read established journals and websites regularly
- Find a mentor who is senior to you, in your particular industry or career path

Rachelle's Answer #1
"This year, I committed to improving my knowledge by reading one book per month. I mapped out my twelve books ahead of time, including topics on my career, the industry, personal development, politics, history, and leadership. I would be happy to share the list with you if you'd like!"
Rachelle's Answer #2
"My current agency does not have a budget for a lot of additional training, coursework, or professional development. For that reason, much of my added learning opportunities are self-led. This year I decided to teach myself more about PhotoShop, to become so good that I could upload my own YouTube videos one day. I would say that I am 3/4 of the way there. It's taken great dedication and patience; however, this is a skill that I am very excited to add to my professional repertoire."
6.
How do you motivate yourself to keep going, even when you do not feel like remaining on task?
It is essential that, as a professional, you can remain on task and focused even when your motivation levels may not be high. The interviewer would like to know that you are highly diligent and disciplined. Nobody is wholly motivated 100% of the time but do assure the interviewer that you can quickly get yourself back on track.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I like to give myself a few rewards throughout the day for completing tasks that are not the most fun. For example, if I have to call some advertising clients that are not the kindest to me, I will tell myself that once I complete them, I can do some design work, which I enjoy."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"If I do not feel motivated it is because I am not busy enough. I do not enjoy a lot of downtime on the job. I will create tasks for myself or take on extra tasks to keep my motivation levels up."
7.
Tell me how you brought value to your most recent position.
This question offers another way for the interviewer to ask about your recent successes and bragging points. The interviewer wants to know which top skills you will highlight if you had to narrow down where you brought the most value.

Perhaps you influenced changes that saved the company money. Maybe you were the top-grossing subscription salesperson. Think of your strengths in action! If you are reliable, talk about how consistent your work has been and how you are in constant support of your coworkers. If you have a strong work ethic, share how you accomplished a project amid harsh obstacles.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"Most recently, I developed a marketing campaign across digital platforms to launch our newest magazine collaboration. I have helped increase exposure by over 124%, and engagement in our Instagram challenges has skyrocketed. To sum it up, I bring both financial value as well as vision and experience in long-term planning of strategies and promotions that will increase engagement and ultimately revenue."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I cared deeply about delivering value to the businesses I supported in my last position. I worked hard to understand the publishing industry so I could position my talents to serve the group best. By learning more, I was able to be a better partner to deliver successful practices across the group."
8.
Looking at your resume, it seems there are certain skills necessary for this position that do not stand out. How do you think you will be able to compensate for these missing skills?
Most job descriptions will have a long list of requirements. Hiring managers are aware that, to find a candidate that checks ALL of the boxes, can sometimes be impossible. If you are missing some of the 'nice to have' or even the 'must have' skills listed in the job description, do not fret! Be open about your shortcomings and discuss with the interviewer how you plan to compensate for those.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I understand there are skills on my resume of strong interest to you and I am prepared to work double time to correct any shortcomings you may see on my resume. If you could point to me which areas you feel I lack experience, I would be happy to elaborate on those today."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"Could you share with me which skills you are seeking? I have a diverse range of internship experiences that I can certainly elaborate on."
9.
Would you say you are a better verbal or written communicator?
In publishing, it's vital that you are talented both as a written, and a verbal communicator. Your talents may lean one way or another, and that is okay. Discuss with the interviewer in which manner you prefer to communicate and then be sure to discuss how you are improving in the other.

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I like to leverage both methods of communication when dealing with business. Sometimes, situations call for verbal communications and other times, written. As a rule of thumb, I tend to practice verbal communications, with written follow up or vice versa. Utilizing multiple methods creates repetition and therefore, change."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I am comfortable with both so it would depend on the message, I suppose. Big news needs to be communicated verbally and followed up in written form, but quick messages or simple changes can be communicated effectively through email without the hassle of breaking away from work for a call or meeting."
10.
With which other publishing companies are you interviewing?
The interviewer is curious and would like to know if you are visiting any of their close competitors to discuss similar roles. You are never under obligation to disclose who you are interviewing with, and you are usually best not to name any names. Be direct without giving away too much. Let the interviewer know that you are active in your search but are being very discerning regarding your applications, and final decision. You also do not want it to appear that you are putting all of your eggs into this one basket. Think of this as a first date question - you want to show your interest, but also keep some mystery!

Rachelle's Answer #1
"I have been interviewing for a couple of similar positions; however, I am furthest in the interview process with Emerald Publishing. I am very pleased with the impressions your management and HR team members have left on me so far."
Rachelle's Answer #2
"I have been approached by Publisher ABC, and one other, to discuss similar editor assistant roles. I am most familiar with Emerald Publishing, and this is my preferred role. Do you have a timeline in mind for this decision?"
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