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Teacher Interview

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60 Teacher
Interview Questions

    Teacher

  1. What is the most challenging experience you've faced as a teacher?

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      We all have challenges in our professions, and it is okay to talk about them! The key is that we do not allow these situations to get the best of us. Begin by sharing your most challenging experience as a teacher. Express that you did not let the case to get the best of you. Instead, you turned it into something positive. Mention what you learned from that situation, and explain what you would do in the future if you found yourself in a similar position again.

  2. Why did you decide to become a teacher?

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      The interviewer wants to know more about the passion that drives you to be an educator. If there was a person or an experience that inspired you to choose the path of teaching as a career, share your story. Discuss your passion for what you do by pinpointing the best parts of your day-to-day, as a teacher. Genuine enthusiasm is the key to a successful reply!

  3. How will you instruct students with varying abilities?

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      The interviewer wants to see how you can adapt to helping students who are at different learning levels and abilities. With this question, you'll want to demonstrate your ability to modify the same material to the learning styles and competencies of each student. Use a specific example, if you can.

  4. How can you encourage a student who lacks confidence and inspire him or her to learn?

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      The interviewer wants to know about your interaction with students, mainly how you work with students who find the traditional educational setting to be a challenge. Demonstrate to the interviewer that you're able to be patient and encouraging to students no matter their confidence level.

  5. What is your classroom management plan and what do you hope to accomplish with it?

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      Think about your teaching style and personality surrounding management. Are you more hands-on or hands-off as a teacher? How passionate and active are you? Talk to the interviewer about your classroom management abilities and what has worked best for you in the past. This question is a great time to ask the interviewer if this school has preferences on classroom management techniques used in the classroom: Some good ideas for the classroom management: 1) Set management goals - rate students' performances as a class each day. 2) Never punish an entire class. 3) Show students it pays to behave - incentives usually work! 4) Establish routines. 5) Give students options.

  6. What interests you about our school?

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      The interviewer would like to know the depth of your knowledge regarding their school and the demographic. The way you answer this question will help them to determine if you will be a good fit when it comes to their workplace culture. Do some research beforehand about the learning environment. For what is the school known? Is it rigorous and academically-oriented, or perhaps its known for its sports teams? Know what strengths the school offers in the district. Then, let the interviewer know precisely how well you believe you will fit in.

  7. A good teacher is always learning. What is something you are learning about recently?

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      Show the interviewer that you continue to advance your learning and that you have a genuine interest in your working environment. What is something new that currently has your attention? Here is a list of things you can talk about: 1) a new hobby or sport you're passionate about 2) a new country or place traveled 3) a new dish you cooked or tried 4) an insightful book or TV show Show the interviewer that you're interesting, and always interested. Make some connections to your teaching and tell them how you've applied or plan to use what you've learned to reach your students, academically or otherwise.

  8. What changes do you make to your lesson plans each year?

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      The interviewer wants to know whether you adapt your lesson plans annually or if you keep them the same. This question is one you'll want to prepare for thoroughly beforehand, as it'll be difficult to answer on the spot. Think about what hasn't worked for your classes and what you did to change that. Areas of change could be: - Testing methods - Percentages required for tests - The scope of projects - Levels of group participation - Assessments - Changing the seating plan to fit learning styles

  9. What are some techniques you use to teach besides direct instruction?

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      Although direct instruction works well for specific topics and types of students, teachers are alternating and expanding their teaching methods to combine both direct teaching and the alternative constructivist approach, which promotes social interaction through discussion and stimulates critical thinking. Think about your teaching style - are you more hands-on or hands-off? Do you allow students to figure out answers on their own? Do you like to be highly involved in their solution process? Here are some strategies that you can discuss: 1) Peer editing, teaching, and assessment 2) Self and teacher assessment 3) Discussion-based lessons 4) Research 5) Learning through visual arts

  10. If you were asked to create a behavior modification plan for ongoing misbehavior, what would it be?

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      Discipline varies widely across the board. For this question, it's important to consider the disciplinary culture of the school in which you are interviewing. While a strict approach may have worked for you in the past, the same method may not work for students of this school. Think about what has worked and failed in your disciplinary approach in the past. Do you lean more toward punishment, reward, or intrinsic motivation strategies? If you don't have much teaching experience, do some research on effective behavior modification methods as this is a question that's likely to come up in any teaching interview.

  11. Discuss one memorable parent meeting you have had in the past.

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      The interviewer wants to know about your ability to work well with the parents of your students. As you know, some parents can pose a challenge if they have unrealistic expectations of their child, or are not involved as much as they should be in their child's educational success. As a part of your teaching job, you may be required to meet and talk to parents regularly, How do you interact with them? Is it a pleasant experience or do you dread meeting parents? The answer to this question will draw some light on how collaborative you are. Keep this answer positive, but don't exaggerate or be over-enthusiastic. A big part of communicating with parents is to be as open and constructive about their child's progress, and sometimes, these meetings can be uncomfortable. Be honest about difficult parents if you've had such an experience, and discuss how you overcame it.

  12. What experience have you had with students from culturally diverse backgrounds?

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      The interviewer wants to learn more about your level of experience with diversity in the classroom. Be open and honest with the interviewer sharing your experiences with students from culturally diverse backgrounds. The interviewer will use your response to understand better the training that should receive for their particular environment. Share your experiences working with students or children of different ethnic, religious, or socioeconomic backgrounds.

  13. What techniques do you use to accommodate different learning styles?

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      The interviewer would like to know if you have a valid method for teaching students with varying learning styles. Not all students are suited to take a two-hour long exam. Visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners have different strengths and weaknesses. Think about your testing methods. Are your tests multiple choice, essay, or both? Do you have pop quizzes? Are there plenty of projects and research papers for students to have an opportunity to do well?

  14. How do you accommodate for non-English speakers or low-level English speakers?

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      The interviewer would like to know how you adapt to students who are unfamiliar with the English language or come to your class as an ESL (English as a Second Language) student. This question addresses the level of extra care and supports you would be expected to provide students with this type of situation. Often, ESL students need much more after-class counseling or follow-up with their schoolwork. What other options can you think of to help the student integrate with the class and keep up with the homework? Prepare several strategies that accommodate non-native or non-English speaking learners in reading, discussion, exams, evaluations, and more. Here are some examples: 1) Pair a foreign learner with a friendly classmate who can help them with their work and adjustment outside of class. 2) Provide written and translated handouts for presentations. 3) Provide study questions, transcribed vocabulary lists or keywords lists. 4) Put students in groups or pairs and avoid having the foreign speaker working alone. 5) Provide one-on-one meeting opportunities and give the student constructive feedback.

  15. Describe your typical lesson.

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      The interviewer would like to know how you organize your lessons. Think back to your student teaching lesson plans or what has worked in your past experiences. Typically, a good class starts with a game, warm-up activity, or discussion about the topic of the lesson you will be teaching. Then, you might do homework check or get started on the day's lesson. For example, include a reading passage, discussion questions, and a short quiz at the end of the assessment. Make sure to include some way to access whether students have understood the material.

  16. High School Teacher

  17. What interests you most when it comes to teaching at the High School level?

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      The interviewer would like to better understand what is motivating you to teach at the High School level. Give one strong example of why being a High School Teacher is an exciting career path for you. Discuss how this role will help you to feel fulfilled in your teaching career.

  18. Have you ever taught a class with special needs students, or students with a disability? If so, how did you adjust your teaching style or curriculum?

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      The interviewer would like to know if you have experience teaching students who have special learning needs. Show that you are willing and able to accommodate the needs of your students. Give a specific example, if you can.

  19. How would you handle a student being disruptive in the classroom?

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      The interviewer would like to know more about your style when it comes to corrective discipline in the classroom. As a High School teacher you will come across students who are challenging, or push your limits. That's a given! Show that you can handle the situation professionally and in a way that demands the respect of your students.

  20. How do you earn the respect of your students?

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      The interviewer would like to know how you go about earning the respect of your students. As a High School teacher you must be able to command presence in the classroom while also being a mentor-type that your students feel they can easily approach with questions and other education related needs. Discuss a bit about your work personality, teaching style, and how your students respond to you.

  21. What qualities do you believe make an excellent teacher?

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      List for the interviewer some of the qualities that you feel are most important for a High School teacher to possess. Be sure to tie in the fact that you personally possess these qualities! Some great qualities could be: - Passion - Concern for kids - Determined and persistent - Confident - A confidante - Flexible - Organized - Committed to professional development - Diligent - Collaborative

  22. What area of professional development are you currently focused on?

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      The interviewer would like to know that you take professional development very seriously. As a teacher you should be looking for opportunities to improve, on a regular basis. Talk briefly about the areas that you are dedicated to improving at the moment.

  23. What is the most challenging part of your job, as a teacher?

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      The interviewer would like to know the areas of your job as a High School teacher, that you find to be the most challenging. Everyone has challenges in the workplace, and that is okay! Avoid talking about difficulty surrounding core requirements. Your example could be related to some technology, or perhaps a specific part of curriculum development.

  24. Tell me about a time that another teacher has influenced you.

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      The interviewer wants to see that you are able to be positively influenced by fellow co-workers and professionals. Show that you are open to assistance, and feedback, when needed. Your real life example can be kept simple! Perhaps a coworker helped you to multitask better during finals, when you were feeling overwhelmed. Maybe their teaching style inspired you. Or, perhaps they gave you great advice on how to handle a student with behavioural concerns.

  25. Have you ever received an award or special workplace accolade?

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      Be sure to add any special awards and accolades on your resume! If you do have these listed on your resume, the interviewer is asking for you to elaborate on the information you have provided. Briefly review any award, what the circumstances were surrounding your nomination, and end with discussing what it meant to you.

  26. What type of student were you in high school?

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      This question is designed to break the ice a bit and allow the interviewer to see your personality a little bit better. Briefly discuss they type of student you were in High School. Be sure to keep it light and tie in how your own High School experience has helped you be a better educator.

  27. How do you handle stress on the job?

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      Are you someone who is able to handle stress on the job? How do you manage the stressful times? Talk to the interviewer about your ability to manage pressure in the workplace.

  28. What types of activities keep you busy, outside of work?

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      The interviewer would like to know what keeps you busy outside of the workplace. Having hobbies and interests outside of work is a very important part of maintaining a healthy work/life balance. Talk to the interviewer about the activities that interest you outside of the workplace.

  29. What are your salary expectations?

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      The best way to discuss your salary expectations are to use your current earnings as an example. Be open, and honest. Transparency is the best choice when salary based questions arise.

  30. When have you had to lead by example?

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      The interviewer wants to know that you are aware of the need to always lead by example. "All the time!" As a leader, your actions, decisions, and demeanour are always under some form of scrutiny. The most stressful workplace situations often surround change so it's a great idea to talk about a time when your organization went through a major change. Change can be very challenging for some people. Discuss how you accept change with a positive attitude. Perhaps a new software system was being implemented. Maybe your company was being acquired. Perhaps a change occurred in your senior leadership. Talk about how easily your team could have leaned towards negativity by becoming unmotivated, or acting fearful of the change. Highlight that you have genuine excitement surrounding the possibilities that come with change and that this excitement rubs off on your team.

  31. We were initially looking for someone with 5 years' experience in a similar role. Considering you have just 2 years' experience, would you be willing to accept this position at a lower salary?

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      Are you willing to earn your way up if the interviewer does not want to offer you top compensation? Discuss with the interviewer what you would expect for compensation if you were offered this position.

  32. How do want your students to remember you?

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      At the end of the school year, or when your students graduate - how do you want them to remember you? As a High School teacher you have an excellent opportunity to be a positive influence on a younger generation. Keep your answer brief, and positive.

  33. You have been hired as the newest member of our teaching team. How would you first introduce yourself to a group of parents, students, and teachers from our school?

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      When an interviewer asks an open ended question like this, it can be difficult to know where to begin...and end! This question haunts many individuals who may accidentally go a little too in depth into their personal lives. It happens. Keep your reply light, and work relevant. Share how you became interested in this career path and what you enjoy about it. This is a great opportunity to describe yourself by discussing the strengths and qualities that you bring.

    READ: View All High School Teacher Interview Questions

  34. Math Teacher

  35. What makes you unique as a math teacher?

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      This is the place to demonstrate several aspects of your personality that are different from traditional math teachers. It's also a good idea to incorporate some of your teaching philosophy into this response.

  36. Why did you decide to become a math teacher?

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      Think about a math teacher who impacted you or a time when you felt accomplished learning math and wanted others to have same experience. If becoming a math intention wasn't your intent, say so honestly as well.

  37. Give an example of a situation in which you made math exciting for your students.

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      Math can be tough and boring at times. Think of a situation in which you exercised your creativity through a game, simulation, a time when you brought your students outdoors, or drew a picture, or played a video - anything to demonstrate that you can think outside the box.

    READ: View All Math Teacher Interview Questions

  38. Middle School Teacher

  39. Why are you a good fit for this job and our school district?

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      This is a great opportunity to demonstrate how much you've done your research on the school and the district and for you to directly correlate your skills and experience. To prepare for this question, check out the school's website, the district's website, and other publicly available resources. Review several years of data for information such as: how do stats on the school compare with the district? how do stats on the district compare with the state/nation? are there elements within the data that pertain to your passions or experience, such as social-emotional learning or a specific subject area? When answering, try to hit these key points: - A quick run-down of your resume, including relevant experience and education. - School/district facts to demonstrate how well you understand the educational environment. - Your motivation and passion to contribute to the school community.

  40. Why did you choose to become a middle school teacher?

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      The interviewers have likely heard a lot of the common reasons people become teachers, like 'loving to work with kids' or 'wanting to give back.' When answering this question, don't shy away from a common response if it is true for you! Make it memorable by elaborating on your answer by sharing an anecdote, a goal you have, or some personal connection you might have.

  41. How do you make learning fun?

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      Every teacher has a different way of engaging students and making content more enjoyable to digest. The interviewers want to know that you balance content with creativity when it comes to delivering a concept to your students. Consider how you make learning fun and engaging in structured - and unstructured - ways.

  42. Have you ever been a substitute teacher? Describe that experience.

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      Substitute teachers don't always know what to expect when they walk into a classroom, so they have to balance confidence, flexibility, and boundaries on the fly. It can be known to be a difficult position, and the interviewer is interested in your ability to navigate complicated classroom circumstances. Pro tip: you might go a step further and add that you are very intentional about setting substitute teachers up for success with a well-outlined lesson plan. This will show that you are aware of how difficult subbing can be, and you plan ahead to ensure that every day in your classroom is valuable - even when you aren't there.

  43. What is the difference between a good teacher and an outstanding teacher?

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      When preparing for this question, consider teachers you've had throughout your life. Which teachers stand out as having been amazing? Which ones do you sometimes forget about, because they were good but not 'outstanding?' Outline a few of the qualities and practices of those teachers and identify commonalities.

    READ: View All Middle School Teacher Interview Questions

  44. Reading Teacher

  45. What specific reading programs would you like to see implemented for struggling readers?

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      This is a great opportunity to draw on the research you have done on their organization. Your answer should include ways that your teaching methods and reading programs align nicely with theirs.

  46. How do you see yourself partnering with teachers?

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      The best way to answer this question is to talk about where you see your strengths, and what can you offer your fellow teachers. What can they offer you?

  47. Why do you want a career as a reading teacher?

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      When answering this question you can absolutely incorporate a personal story. You could also talk about what inspired you to become a teacher in the first place.

    READ: View All Reading Teacher Interview Questions

  48. Elementary Teacher

  49. How would you rank these in importance and why? Planning, discipline, methods, evaluation.

    • ANSWER ADVICE

      Note that 'discipline' is the only character trait that is based on you. Planning, methods, and evaluation are all skills that can be taught. If you choose another aspect from the list, make sure you justify your statements with a clear explanation. It may help to think in terms of how one aspect supports or is a prerequisite for another aspect to function.

  50. Are you constantly searching for things you can show, tell, or demonstrate to students? Tell us about some recent discovery, something that you have found.

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      Demonstrate that you're fully committed and engaged with your profession by giving an answer that shows an moment that you were inspired while going about your daily life.

  51. What would you tell a parent who complained about his/her child not having enough homework?

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      Demonstrate your ability to listen and identify the root cause of a problem by laying out a step by step description of the kinds of questions you would ask. Bolster your professionalism by positioning yourself as a problem solver or by showing that you're experienced.

    READ: View All Elementary Teacher Interview Questions

  52. English Teacher

  53. What is the right way to teach English?

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      The interviewer wants to identify your style of teaching English. There is no 'right way' because people learn English differently. One student may get a lot out of one approach, while another student may struggle. So, do not talk about one teaching method of English. Instead, talk about various learning styles that you will incorporate to help students' learn and enjoy English.

  54. Why do students need English in their lives?

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      This question allows the interviewer to see what your expectations are for your English students. Give an answer that relates English to the world around your students. By showing English is empowering to any student, you can speak to the value of this subject.

  55. How can you tell if a student understands the material or not?

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      Individual interaction with each student in the classroom is imperative. The interviewer wants to see how you spend time with every student in the class period. With strategies and methodology, share with the interviewer things you use.

  56. What importance do you place on collaborating with other teachers? Tell me about a time when you worked with another teacher to integrate elements of your lessons.

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      Interviewers want to see how well you collaborate with others. The best way to be a unified school is by working together with your counterparts. Share past examples of how you have maximized your time in this area before.

  57. How can you tell if a student is on-task or not?

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      This question goes a little deeper than just being observant of students being disruptive or not. The interviewer wants to know how you get students individually to speak their knowledge of the subject. Speak to strategies or implementations you have used over the years.

    READ: View All English Teacher Interview Questions

  58. ESL Teacher

  59. What makes an ESL classroom different from a traditional classroom?

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      The learning environment in a classroom with non-English speakers does look different from a regular classroom. With a variety of resources and teaching tools, new language learning needs support. This question's answer needs to give clarity to the interviewer if you can support ESL students or not. Giving examples of how you have done this before will help.

  60. Give an example of progress monitoring in your ESL class.

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      Finding ways for your students to succeed is what the interviewer wants to see. Express the kind of software, methods, tools, and other resources you use to track any progress.

  61. What do you do to communicate with ESL students' families?

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      Planning out how to get family members and parents involved with what their student is doing in school is essential. Interviewers want to see how you showcase communication skills, even if they do not speak English.

  62. What is the best teaching achievement you have experienced?

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      Give a personal example of teaching accolades, but you can also focus on a teacher/student success story. Being more specific is the best answer here. The interviewer wants to get to know you and see what matters to you in the profession.

    READ: View All ESL Teacher Interview Questions

  63. Student Teacher

  64. How has college prepped you for teaching?

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      When involved in an interview, the interviewer wants to get to know your past. By talking about your college experience, you can give detailed information on your life that has prepared you for a moment such as this. The more examples, the better her that connect with teaching.

  65. What do you look forward to when it pertains to teaching?

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      The interviewer wants to see your vision and dreams for the future. Think about experiences you are hoping for in the classroom to give clarity to the situation. This way, you will give purpose to what you are looking to accomplish as a teacher at this specific school.

  66. What makes you the best option for the student teaching vacancy?

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      With this question, the interviewer is trying to separate the student teaching pool. To do this, they will try to see what best qualities each candidate has. Then, they can fill the vacancy much easier.

  67. Share a time you were a risk-taker.

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      There are times in any profession where people have to go outside their comfort zone. Proving that you have been a risk-taker in your life will show your humanity and flexibility. Give an example that expands on your value.

  68. What challenges do you expect as a student-teacher?

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      The interviewer wants to make sure you have an idea of what to expect in the job you want. To do this appropriately, speak to challenges for the specific school. Then, the interviewer will see that you have done your due diligence beforehand.

    READ: View All Student Teacher Interview Questions

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